ABCD Study publications are authored by ABCD investigators, collaborators, and non-ABCD researchers. The analysis methodologies, findings, and interpretations expressed in these publications are those of the authors and do not constitute an endorsement by the ABCD Study®.

Please note that the publications listed here include empirical as well as non-empirical papers (e.g., focused review articles, editorials).

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Title Journal Authors Year Details
Toggle Corticolimbic connectivity mediates the relationship between pubertal timing and mental health problems. Psychological medicine Vijayakumar N, Whittle S, Silk TJ 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Undergoing puberty ahead of peers (‘earlier pubertal timing’) is an important risk factor for mental health problems during early adolescence. The current study examined pathways between pubertal timing and mental health via connectivity of neural systems implicated in emotional reactivity and regulation (specifically corticolimbic connections) in 9- to 14-year-olds.

Journal

Psychological medicine

Published

2023/06/02

Authors

Vijayakumar N, Whittle S, Silk TJ

Keywords

brain connectivity, family environment, mental health, pubertal timing, resting-state

DOI

10.1017/S0033291723001472
Toggle Associations Between Socioeconomic Status, Obesity, Cognition, and White Matter Microstructure in Children. JAMA network open Li ZA, Cai Y, Taylor RL, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Lower neighborhood and household socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with negative health outcomes and altered brain structure in children. It is unclear whether such findings extend to white matter and via what mechanisms.

Journal

JAMA network open

Published

2023/06/01

Authors

Li ZA, Cai Y, Taylor RL, Eisenstein SA, Barch DM, Marek S, Hershey T

Keywords

DOI

10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2023.20276
Toggle Effects of ambient fine particulates, nitrogen dioxide, and ozone on maturation of functional brain networks across early adolescence. Environment international Cotter DL, Campbell CE, Sukumaran K, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Air pollution is linked to neurodevelopmental delays, but its association with longitudinal changes in brain network development has yet to be investigated. We aimed to characterize the effect of PM, O, and NO exposure at ages 9-10 years on changes in functional connectivity (FC) over a 2-year follow-up period, with a focus on the salience (SN), frontoparietal (FPN), and default-mode (DMN) brain networks as well as the amygdala and hippocampus given their importance in emotional and cognitive functioning.

Journal

Environment international

Published

2023/06/01

Authors

Cotter DL, Campbell CE, Sukumaran K, McConnell R, Berhane K, Schwartz J, Hackman DA, Ahmadi H, Chen JC, Herting MM

Keywords

Adolescence, Air pollution, Brain development, Functional connectivity, Functional magnetic resonance imaging, Longitudinal, Resting-state

DOI

10.1016/j.envint.2023.108001
Toggle Associations of Changes in Sleep and Emotional and Behavioral Problems From Late Childhood to Early Adolescence. JAMA psychiatry Cooper R, Di Biase MA, Bei B, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Sleep problems and psychopathology symptoms are highly comorbid and bidirectionally correlated across childhood and adolescence. Whether these associations are specific to discrete profiles of sleep problems and specific internalizing and externalizing phenomena is currently unclear.

Journal

JAMA psychiatry

Published

2023/06/01

Authors

Cooper R, Di Biase MA, Bei B, Quach J, Cropley V

Keywords

DOI

10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2023.0379
Toggle Cognitive Function in People With Familial Risk of Depression. JAMA psychiatry Cullen B, Gameroff MJ, Ward J, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Cognitive impairment in depression is poorly understood. Family history of depression is a potentially useful risk marker for cognitive impairment, facilitating early identification and targeted intervention in those at highest risk, even if they do not themselves have depression. Several research cohorts have emerged recently that enable findings to be compared according to varying depths of family history phenotyping, in some cases also with genetic data, across the life span.

Journal

JAMA psychiatry

Published

2023/06/01

Authors

Cullen B, Gameroff MJ, Ward J, Bailey MES, Lyall DM, Lyall LM, MacSweeney N, Murphy E, Sangha N, Shen X, Strawbridge RJ, van Dijk MT, Zhu X, Smith DJ, Talati A, Whalley HC, Cavanagh J, Weissman MM

Keywords

DOI

10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2023.0716
Toggle Mental Health Comorbidities, Household Firearm Ownership, and Firearm Access Among Children. Pediatrics Hullenaar KL, Rowhani-Rahbar A, Morgan ER, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

To examine how youth and their caregivers’ mental health risk factors for suicide are associated with youth firearm access inside and outside the home.

Journal

Pediatrics

Published

2023/06/01

Authors

Hullenaar KL, Rowhani-Rahbar A, Morgan ER, Hicks CD, Rivara FP

Keywords

DOI

10.1542/peds.2022-060610
Toggle Sleep mediates the effect of stressful environments on youth development of impulsivity: The moderating role of within default mode network resting-state functional connectivity. Sleep health Zhang L, Cui Z, Huffman LG, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Youth raised in stressful environments are at increased risk for developing impulsive traits, which are a robust precursor of problem behaviors. Sleep may mediate the link between stress and problem behaviors as it is both sensitive to stress and essential for neurocognitive development underlying behavioral control during adolescence. The default mode network (DMN) is a brain network implicated in stress regulation and sleep. Yet, it is poorly understood how individual differences in resting-state DMN moderate the effect of stressful environments on impulsivity via sleep problems.

Journal

Sleep health

Published

2023/06/01

Authors

Zhang L, Cui Z, Huffman LG, Oshri A

Keywords

Default mode network, Resting-state functional connectivity, Sleep duration, Sleep latency, Stressful environments, fMRI

DOI

10.1016/j.sleh.2023.03.005
Toggle Corticostriatal connectivity mediates the reciprocal relationship between parent-reported sleep duration and impulsivity in early adolescents. Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines Yang FN, Liu TT, Wang Z 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Adolescence, a developmental period characterized by significant changes in sleep, is associated with normative increases in impulsivity. While short sleep duration has been linked to elevated impulsivity, the neural mechanism underlying the relationship between short sleep duration and elevated impulsivity remains poorly understood.

Journal

Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines

Published

2023/05/29

Authors

Yang FN, Liu TT, Wang Z

Keywords

Sleep, adolescents, brain imaging, development, impulsivity

DOI

10.1111/jcpp.13843
Toggle Untangling the links between economics and youth mental health. Nature medicine Muliyil S 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Journal

Nature medicine

Published

2023/05/26

Authors

Muliyil S

Keywords

Economics, Paediatrics, Psychiatric disorders, Public health

DOI

10.1038/d41591-023-00048-0
Toggle The genetic architecture of fornix white matter microstructure and their involvement in neuropsychiatric disorders. Translational psychiatry Ou YN, Ge YJ, Wu BS, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

The fornix is a white matter bundle located in the center of the hippocampaldiencephalic limbic circuit that controls memory and executive functions, yet its genetic architectures and involvement in brain disorders remain largely unknown. We carried out a genome-wide association analysis of 30,832 UK Biobank individuals of the six fornix diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) traits. The post-GWAS analysis allowed us to identify causal genetic variants in phenotypes at the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), locus, and gene levels, as well as genetic overlap with brain health-related traits. We further generalized our GWAS in adolescent brain cognitive development (ABCD) cohort. The GWAS identified 63 independent significant variants within 20 genomic loci associated (P < 8.33 × 10) with the six fornix dMRI traits. Geminin coiled-coil domain containing (GMNC) and NUAK family SNF1-like kinase 1 (NUAK1) gene were highlighted, which were found in UKB and replicated in ABCD. The heritability of the six traits ranged from 10% to 27%. Gene mapping strategies identified 213 genes, where 11 were supported by all of four methods. Gene-based analyses revealed pathways relating to cell development and differentiation, with astrocytes found to be significantly enriched. Pleiotropy analyses with eight neurological and psychiatric disorders revealed shared variants, especially with schizophrenia under the conjFDR threshold of 0.05. These findings advance our understanding of the complex genetic architectures of fornix and their relevance in neurological and psychiatric disorders.

Journal

Translational psychiatry

Published

2023/05/26

Authors

Ou YN, Ge YJ, Wu BS, Zhang Y, Jiang YC, Kuo K, Yang L, Tan L, Feng JF, Cheng W, Yu JT

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41398-023-02475-6
Toggle Sociocultural influences on alcohol expectancies in early adolescence: Findings from the ABCD study. Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association Sanchez M, Gonzalez MR, Fernandez A, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Alcohol expectancies (AE) during early adolescence predict early alcohol use initiation and problem drinking both cross-sectionally and prospectively well into adulthood. Yet, our understanding of the sociocultural factors associated with AE during this development period remains limited. This study examines associations between AE and sociocultural factors across various domains (i.e., individual, family, peer, school, community, and culture) in a demographically diverse sample of 10- to 14-year-old youth in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study (ABCD Study).

Journal

Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association

Published

2023/05/25

Authors

Sanchez M, Gonzalez MR, Fernandez A, Barton A, Diaz V, Wang W

Keywords

DOI

10.1037/hea0001290
Toggle Higher blood pressure and weight observed among early adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic. American journal of preventive cardiology Nagata JM, Yang J, Alsamman S, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic led to significant disruptions in the lifestyle behaviors of adolescents; however, there is a paucity of data on objective changes in health indicators of adolescents such as blood pressure, hypertension, and weight. The aim of this study is to quantify differences in blood pressure and weight before and during the COVID-19 pandemic among a demographically diverse national sample of early adolescents. We analyzed cross-sectional data from 2018 to 2020, corresponding to the second follow-up year (Year 2) of the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study. Among 4,065 early adolescents (mean age 12.00, 49.4% female, 55.5% white), 3.4% vs 6.4% of adolescents had hypertension pre-pandemic vs during the pandemic ( < 0.001). The pandemic was associated with a 4.65 percentile (95% CI 2.65, 6.66) higher diastolic blood pressure, and a 1.68 kg (95% CI 0.51, 2.85) higher weight when adjusting for covariates. The pandemic was associated with a 1.97 higher odds of hypertension (95% CI 1.33, 2.92) compared to pre-pandemic when adjusting for covariates. Future studies should explore mechanisms and longitudinal trends in blood pressure among adolescents as they return to pre-pandemic lifestyle behaviors.

Journal

American journal of preventive cardiology

Published

2023/05/20

Authors

Nagata JM, Yang J, Alsamman S, Al-Shoaibi AAA, Ganson KT, Pettee Gabriel K, Baker FC

Keywords

Adolescent, Blood pressure, COVID-19, Hypertension, Obesity, Pandemic, Pediatrics, Weight

DOI

10.1016/j.ajpc.2023.100508
Toggle Genetic patterning for child psychopathology is distinct from that for adults and implicates fetal cerebellar development. Nature neuroscience Hughes DE, Kunitoki K, Elyounssi S, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Childhood psychiatric symptoms are often diffuse but can coalesce into discrete mental illnesses during late adolescence. We leveraged polygenic scores (PGSs) to parse genomic risk for childhood symptoms and to uncover related neurodevelopmental mechanisms with transcriptomic and neuroimaging data. In independent samples (Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development, Generation R) a narrow cross-disorder neurodevelopmental PGS, reflecting risk for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism, depression and Tourette syndrome, predicted psychiatric symptoms through early adolescence with greater sensitivity than broad cross-disorder PGSs reflecting shared risk across eight psychiatric disorders, the disorder-specific PGS individually or two other narrow cross-disorder (Compulsive, Mood-Psychotic) scores. Neurodevelopmental PGS-associated genes were preferentially expressed in the cerebellum, where their expression peaked prenatally. Further, lower gray matter volumes in cerebellum and functionally coupled cortical regions associated with psychiatric symptoms in mid-childhood. These findings demonstrate that the genetic underpinnings of pediatric psychiatric symptoms differ from those of adult illness, and implicate fetal cerebellar developmental processes that endure through childhood.

Journal

Nature neuroscience

Published

2023/05/18

Authors

Hughes DE, Kunitoki K, Elyounssi S, Luo M, Bazer OM, Hopkinson CE, Dowling KF, Doyle AE, Dunn EC, Eryilmaz H, Gilman JM, Holt DJ, Valera EM, Smoller JW, Cecil CAM, Tiemeier H, Lee PH, Roffman JL

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41593-023-01321-8
Toggle Characterizing the dimensional structure of early-life adversity in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study. Developmental cognitive neuroscience Brieant A, Vannucci A, Nakua H, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Early-life adversity has profound consequences for youth neurodevelopment and adjustment; however, experiences of adversity are heterogeneous and interrelated in complex ways that can be difficult to operationalize and organize in developmental research. We sought to characterize the underlying dimensional structure of co-occurring adverse experiences among a subset of youth (ages 9-10) from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study (N = 7115), a community sample of youth in the United States. We identified 60 environmental and experiential variables that reflect adverse experiences. Exploratory factor analysis identified 10 robust dimensions of early-life adversity co-occurrence, corresponding to conceptual domains such as caregiver substance use and biological caregiver separation, caregiver psychopathology, caregiver lack of support, and socioeconomic disadvantage / neighborhood lack of safety. These dimensions demonstrated distinct associations with internalizing problems, externalizing problems, cognitive flexibility, and inhibitory control. Non-metric multidimensional scaling characterized qualitative similarity among the 10 identified dimensions. Results supported a nonlinear three-dimensional structure representing early-life adversity, including continuous gradients of “perspective”, “environmental uncertainty”, and “acts of omission/commission”. Our findings suggest that there are distinct dimensions of early-life adversity co-occurrence in the ABCD sample at baseline, and the resulting dimensions may have unique implications for neurodevelopment and youth behavior.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2023/05/18

Authors

Brieant A, Vannucci A, Nakua H, Harris J, Lovell J, Brundavanam D, Tottenham N, Gee DG

Keywords

ABCD Study, Cognitive control, Dimensions, Early-life adversity, Psychopathology

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2023.101256
Toggle Pandemic-Related Changes in the Prevalence of Early Adolescent Alcohol and Drug Use, 2020-2021: Data From a Multisite Cohort Study. The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine Pelham WE, Tapert SF, Zúñiga ML, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Evaluate changes in early adolescent substance use from May 2020 to May 2021 during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic using data from a prospective nationwide cohort: the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study.

Journal

The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine

Published

2023/05/16

Authors

Pelham WE, Tapert SF, Zúñiga ML, Thompson WK, Wade NE, Gonzalez MR, Patel H, Baker FC, Dowling GJ, Van Rinsveld AM, Baskin-Sommers A, Kiss O, Brown SA

Keywords

Adolescence, Alcohol, COVID-19, Cannabis, Drugs, Nicotine

DOI

10.1016/j.jadohealth.2023.02.040
Toggle Editorial: Shifting the Landscape of Child Psychiatric Epidemiology. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Merikangas KR, Salum GA 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

The results of recent surveys that show high levels of symptoms of anxiety and depression have generated widespread concern about the mental health of US youth. Although such increases and their causes require immediate action, these symptoms alone do not indicate an epidemic of mental disorders in the US because they do not reflect mental disorders that are characterized by protracted duration and educational or social impairment. Unfortunately, there are no recent comparable data on the full range of common mental disorders. (e.g., Anxiety, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Major Depression, etc.) in nationally representative samples of US youth to provide a baseline for the reported increased distress in recent surveys. Therefore, we must rely on indirect information derived from surveys of subsets of symptoms and behaviors or of restricted age groups, and web-based samples with unknown biases and limited generalizability. This editorial describes how the findings from a recent report of prevalence of mental disorders in 9-10-year-old youths from the ABCD study can contribute to the national profile of mental disorders in youth. We highlight the need to address the lack of systematic data on youth emotional and behavioral disorders in the US through concerted efforts to coordinate the multi-agency sources of data on youth mental health. This will require harmonization of sampling and methods, informed application of internet-based tools based on systematic sampling and non-probability sampling methods and promotion of efforts to bridge the gap between population-based research and interventions at both the societal and individual levels.

Journal

Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

Published

2023/05/16

Authors

Merikangas KR, Salum GA

Keywords

DOI

10.1016/j.jaac.2023.05.006
Toggle The Relationship Between Cortical Thickness and Executive Function Measures in Children With and Without ADHD. Journal of attention disorders Sarabin E, Harkness K, Murias K 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is characterized by inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity; however, other executive function dysregulation is common, including inhibition and working memory. This study aims to identify CT differences based on executive function performance in individuals with and without ADHD.

Journal

Journal of attention disorders

Published

2023/05/15

Authors

Sarabin E, Harkness K, Murias K

Keywords

attention, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), cortical thickness (CT), executive function, neuroimaging

DOI

10.1177/10870547231174036
Toggle Neural Circuit Markers of Familial Risk for Depression Among Healthy Youths in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study. Biological psychiatry. Cognitive neuroscience and neuroimaging Holt-Gosselin B, Keding TJ, Poulin R, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Family history of depression is a robust predictor of early-onset depression, which may confer risk through alterations in neural circuits that have been implicated in reward and emotional processing. These alterations may be evident in youths who are at familial risk for depression but who do not currently have depression. However, the identification of robust and replicable findings has been hindered by few studies and small sample sizes. In the current study, we sought to identify functional connectivity (FC) patterns associated with familial risk for depression.

Journal

Biological psychiatry. Cognitive neuroscience and neuroimaging

Published

2023/05/12

Authors

Holt-Gosselin B, Keding TJ, Poulin R, Brieant A, Rueter A, Hendrickson TJ, Perrone A, Byington N, Houghton A, Miranda-Dominguez O, Feczko E, Fair DA, Joormann J, Gee DG

Keywords

ABCD Study, Depression, Familial risk for depression, Functional connectivity, Resting-state fMRI, Youth

DOI

10.1016/j.bpsc.2023.05.001
Toggle Neural responses to reward valence and magnitude from pre- to early adolescence. NeuroImage Gadassi Polack R, Mollick JA, Keren H, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Neural activation during reward processing is thought to underlie critical behavioral changes that take place during the transition to adolescence (e.g., learning, risk-taking). Though literature on the neural basis of reward processing in adolescence is booming, important gaps remain. First, more information is needed regarding changes in functional neuroanatomy in early adolescence. Another gap is understanding whether sensitivity to different aspects of the incentive (e.g., magnitude and valence) changes during the transition into adolescence. We used fMRI from a large sample of preadolescent children to characterize neural responses to incentive valence vs. magnitude during anticipation and feedback, and their change over a period of two years.

Journal

NeuroImage

Published

2023/05/12

Authors

Gadassi Polack R, Mollick JA, Keren H, Joormann J, Watts R

Keywords

ABCD study, Adolescence, Functional magnetic resonance imaging, Monetary incentive delay task, Reward processing

DOI

10.1016/j.neuroimage.2023.120166
Toggle Shared molecular genetic factors influence subcortical brain morphometry and Parkinson's disease risk. NPJ Parkinson's disease García-Marín LM, Reyes-Pérez P, Diaz-Torres S, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a late-onset and genetically complex neurodegenerative disorder. Here we sought to identify genes and molecular pathways underlying the associations between PD and the volume of ten brain structures measured through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. We leveraged genome-wide genetic data from several cohorts, including the International Parkinson’s Disease Genomics Consortium (IPDG), the UK Biobank, the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study, the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE), the Enhancing Neuroimaging Genetics through Meta-Analyses (ENIGMA), and 23andMe. We observed significant positive genetic correlations between PD and intracranial and subcortical brain volumes. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) – pairwise analyses identified 210 genomic segments with shared aetiology between PD and at least one of these brain structures. Pathway enrichment results highlight potential links with chronic inflammation, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal pathway, mitophagy, disrupted vesicle-trafficking, calcium-dependent, and autophagic pathways. Investigations for putative causal genetic effects suggest that a larger putamen volume could influence PD risk, independently of the potential causal genetic effects of intracranial volume (ICV) on PD. Our findings suggest that genetic variants influencing larger intracranial and subcortical brain volumes, possibly during earlier stages of life, influence the risk of developing PD later in life.

Journal

NPJ Parkinson's disease

Published

2023/05/10

Authors

García-Marín LM, Reyes-Pérez P, Diaz-Torres S, Medina-Rivera A, Martin NG, Mitchell BL, Rentería ME

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41531-023-00515-y
Toggle Companion animals and profiles of peer social behavior in adolescence. Journal of adolescence Halbreich ED, Callina K, King EK, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Relationships with companion animals have been associated with higher levels of prosocial behavior and lower levels of socioemotional difficulties for children and adolescents. Companion animals may be supportive of developing prosocial behavior in youth through practice with positive social interactions and the development of empathy and reciprocity skills. The goal of this study was to use a person-centered approach to investigate if living with a pet (including pet species) is associated with profiles of adolescent peer social behaviors (i.e., prosocial, aggressive), and size of their peer network.

Journal

Journal of adolescence

Published

2023/05/10

Authors

Halbreich ED, Callina K, King EK, Mueller MK

Keywords

adolescence, companion animals, human-animal interaction, peer interactions, prosocial behavior

DOI

10.1002/jad.12183
Toggle The prospective relationship between weight-based discrimination and eating pathology among youth. Eating behaviors Pearlman AT, Murphy MA, Raiciulescu S, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Among adults and adolescents, weight-based discrimination is associated with disordered eating. However, these relationships remain understudied in children. Given that weight-based discrimination is commonly reported among youth, and that childhood is a crucial developmental period for the onset of disordered eating, the current study assessed prospective associations between weight-based discrimination and eating pathology among participants in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study. At the one-year visit, children indicated whether they had experienced discrimination due to their weight within the past year. Parents completed a computerized clinical interview to determine the presence of sub-or-full threshold eating disorders (AN, BN, and BED) among their children. At the two-year visit, children completed the same assessment. Height and fasting weight were obtained. Logistic regressions, adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, family income, BMI%ile, and parent-reported presence of the respective eating disorder at one-year, were conducted to assess the associations between weight-based discrimination and eating pathology. Participants were 10,299 children who completed measures at both the one- and two-year visits (M at one-year: 10.92 ± 0.64, 47.6 % female, 45.9 % racial/ethnic minority). The presence of weight-based discrimination, reported by 5.6 % (n = 574) of children, was significantly associated with a greater likelihood of reporting AN, BN, and BED one-year later (ORs: 1.94-4.91). Findings suggest that weight-based discrimination may confer additional risk for the onset of disordered eating, above and beyond the contribution of body weight. Intersectional research is needed to examine the role of multiple forms of discrimination in relation to the development of eating pathology.

Journal

Eating behaviors

Published

2023/05/10

Authors

Pearlman AT, Murphy MA, Raiciulescu S, Gray JC, Klein DA, Schvey NA

Keywords

Eating pathology, Longitudinal, Pediatric mental health, Weight-based discrimination

DOI

10.1016/j.eatbeh.2023.101746
Toggle The Structure of Cognitive Abilities and Associations with Problem Behaviors in Early Adolescence: An Analysis of Baseline Data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study. Journal of Intelligence Moore DM, Conway ARA 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Using baseline data ( = 9875) from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study examining children aged 9 to 10 years, the current analyses included: (1) exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of neurocognitive measures administered during baseline collection, and (2) linear regression analyses on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), controlling for demographic and socioeconomic factors. The neurocognitive tasks measured episodic memory, executive function (EF; attention), language skills, processing speed, working memory, visuospatial ability, and reasoning. The CBCL included composite scores of parent-reported internalizing, externalizing, and stress-related behavior problems. The study reported here serves as an extension of prior research using a principal components analysis (PCA) of the ABCD baseline data. We propose an alternative solution using factor analysis. Analyses revealed a three-factor structure: verbal ability (VA), executive function/processing speed (EF/PS), and working memory/episodic memory (WM/EM). These factors were significantly correlated with the CBCL scores, albeit with small effect sizes. These findings provide a novel three-factor solution to the structure of cognitive abilities measured in the ABCD Study, offering new insights into the association between cognitive function and problem behaviors in early adolescence.

Journal

Journal of Intelligence

Published

2023/05/10

Authors

Moore DM, Conway ARA

Keywords

cognitive function, externalizing, factor analysis, internalizing

DOI

10.3390/jintelligence11050090
Toggle Precision behavioral phenotyping as a strategy for uncovering the biological correlates of psychopathology. Nature mental health Tiego J, Martin EA, DeYoung CG, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Our capacity to measure diverse aspects of human biology has developed rapidly in the past decades, but the rate at which these techniques have generated insights into the biological correlates of psychopathology has lagged far behind. The slow progress is partly due to the poor sensitivity, specificity and replicability of many findings in the literature, which have in turn been attributed to small effect sizes, small sample sizes and inadequate statistical power. A commonly proposed solution is to focus on large, consortia-sized samples. Yet it is abundantly clear that increasing sample sizes will have a limited impact unless a more fundamental issue is addressed: the precision with which target behavioral phenotypes are measured. Here, we discuss challenges, outline several ways forward and provide worked examples to demonstrate key problems and potential solutions. A precision phenotyping approach can enhance the discovery and replicability of associations between biology and psychopathology.

Journal

Nature mental health

Published

2023/05/10

Authors

Tiego J, Martin EA, DeYoung CG, Hagan K, Cooper SE, Pasion R, Satchell L, Shackman AJ, Bellgrove MA, Fornito A

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s44220-023-00057-5
Toggle Associations among body mass index, working memory performance, gray matter volume, and brain activation in healthy children. Cerebral cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991) Zhang Y, Ji W, Jiang F, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

To investigate the neural mechanisms underlying the association between poorer working memory performance and higher body mass index (BMI) in children. We employed structural-(sMRI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with a 2-back working memory task to examine brain abnormalities and their associations with BMI and working memory performance in 232 children with overweight/obesity (OW/OB) and 244 normal weight children (NW) from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development dataset. OW/OB had lower working memory accuracy, which was associated with higher BMI. They showed smaller gray matter (GM) volumes in the left superior frontal gyrus (SFG_L), dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, medial orbital frontal cortex, and medial superior frontal gyrus, which were associated with lower working memory accuracy. During the working memory task, OW/OB relative to NW showed weaker activation in the left superior temporal pole, amygdala, insula, and bilateral caudate. In addition, caudate activation mediated the relationship between higher BMI and lower working memory accuracy. Higher BMI is associated with smaller GM volumes and weaker brain activation in regions involved with working memory. Task-related caudate dysfunction may account for lower working memory accuracy in children with higher BMI.

Journal

Cerebral cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991)

Published

2023/05/09

Authors

Zhang Y, Ji W, Jiang F, Wu F, Li G, Hu Y, Zhang W, Wang J, Fan X, Wei X, Manza P, Tomasi D, Volkow ND, Gao X, Wang GJ, Zhang Y

Keywords

ABCD, GM volume, childhood obesity, task-fMRI, working memory

DOI

10.1093/cercor/bhac507
Toggle Mapping human brain charts cross-sectionally and longitudinally. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Di Biase MA, Tian YE, Bethlehem RAI, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Brain scans acquired across large, age-diverse cohorts have facilitated recent progress in establishing normative brain aging charts. Here, we ask the critical question of whether cross-sectional estimates of age-related brain trajectories resemble those directly measured from longitudinal data. We show that age-related brain changes inferred from cross-sectionally mapped brain charts can substantially underestimate actual changes measured longitudinally. We further find that brain aging trajectories vary markedly between individuals and are difficult to predict with population-level age trends estimated cross-sectionally. Prediction errors relate modestly to neuroimaging confounds and lifestyle factors. Our findings provide explicit evidence for the importance of longitudinal measurements in ascertaining brain development and aging trajectories.

Journal

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Published

2023/05/08

Authors

Di Biase MA, Tian YE, Bethlehem RAI, Seidlitz J, Alexander-Bloch AF, Yeo BTT, Zalesky A

Keywords

brain trajectory, cross-sectional, individual prediction, longitudinal, normative models

DOI

10.1073/pnas.2216798120
Toggle Intelligence Polygenic Score Is More Predictive of Crystallized Measures: Evidence From the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study. Psychological science Loughnan RJ, Palmer CE, Thompson WK, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Findings in adults have shown that crystallized measures of intelligence, which are more culturally sensitive than fluid intelligence measures, have greater heritability; however, these results have not been found in children. The present study used data from 8,518 participants between 9 and 11 years old from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study. We found that polygenic predictors of intelligence test performance (based on genome-wide association meta-analyses of data from 269,867 individuals) and of educational attainment (based on data from 1.1 million individuals) predicted neurocognitive performance. We found that crystallized measures were more strongly associated with both polygenic predictors than were fluid measures. This mirrored heritability differences reported previously in adults and suggests similar associations in children. This may be consistent with a prominent role of gene-environment correlation in cognitive development measured by crystallized intelligence tests. Environmental and experiential mediators may represent malleable targets for improving cognitive outcomes.

Journal

Psychological science

Published

2023/05/05

Authors

Loughnan RJ, Palmer CE, Thompson WK, Dale AM, Jernigan TL, Chieh Fan C

Keywords

behavior genetics, childhood development, cognitive ability, open materials

DOI

10.1177/09567976231160702
Toggle Associations between resting state functional brain connectivity and childhood anhedonia: A reproduction and replication study. PloS one Zhou Y, Pat N, Neale MC 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Previously, a study using a sample of the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD)® study from the earlier 1.0 release found differences in several resting state functional MRI (rsfMRI) brain connectivity measures associated with children reporting anhedonia. Here, we aim to reproduce, replicate, and extend the previous findings using data from the later ABCD study 4.0 release, which includes a significantly larger sample.

Journal

PloS one

Published

2023/05/04

Authors

Zhou Y, Pat N, Neale MC

Keywords

DOI

10.1371/journal.pone.0277158
Toggle State-level macro-economic factors moderate the association of low income with brain structure and mental health in U.S. children. Nature communications Weissman DG, Hatzenbuehler ML, Cikara M, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Macrostructural characteristics, such as cost of living and state-level anti-poverty programs relate to the magnitude of socioeconomic disparities in brain development and mental health. In this study we leveraged data from the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development (ABCD) study from 10,633 9-11 year old youth (5115 female) across 17 states. Lower income was associated with smaller hippocampal volume and higher internalizing psychopathology. These associations were stronger in states with higher cost of living. However, in high cost of living states that provide more generous cash benefits for low-income families, socioeconomic disparities in hippocampal volume were reduced by 34%, such that the association of family income with hippocampal volume resembled that in the lowest cost of living states. We observed similar patterns for internalizing psychopathology. State-level anti-poverty programs and cost of living may be confounded with other factors related to neurodevelopment and mental health. However, the patterns were robust to controls for numerous state-level social, economic, and political characteristics. These findings suggest that state-level macrostructural characteristics, including the generosity of anti-poverty policies, are potentially relevant for addressing the relationship of low income with brain development and mental health.

Journal

Nature communications

Published

2023/05/02

Authors

Weissman DG, Hatzenbuehler ML, Cikara M, Barch DM, McLaughlin KA

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41467-023-37778-1
Toggle Childhood obesity is linked to putative neuroinflammation in brain white matter, hypothalamus, and striatum. Cerebral cortex communications Li ZA, Samara A, Ray MK, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Neuroinflammation is both a consequence and driver of overfeeding and weight gain in rodent obesity models. Advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enable investigations of brain microstructure that suggests neuroinflammation in human obesity. To assess the convergent validity across MRI techniques and extend previous findings, we used diffusion basis spectrum imaging (DBSI) to characterize obesity-associated alterations in brain microstructure in 601 children (age 9-11 years) from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study. Compared with children with normal-weight, greater DBSI restricted fraction (RF), reflecting neuroinflammation-related cellularity, was seen in widespread white matter in children with overweight and obesity. Greater DBSI-RF in hypothalamus, caudate nucleus, putamen, and, in particular, nucleus accumbens, correlated with higher baseline body mass index and related anthropometrics. Comparable findings were seen in the striatum with a previously reported restriction spectrum imaging (RSI) model. Gain in waist circumference over 1 and 2 years related, at nominal significance, to greater baseline RSI-assessed restricted diffusion in nucleus accumbens and caudate nucleus, and DBSI-RF in hypothalamus, respectively. Here we demonstrate that childhood obesity is associated with microstructural alterations in white matter, hypothalamus, and striatum. Our results also support the reproducibility, across MRI methods, of findings of obesity-related putative neuroinflammation in children.

Journal

Cerebral cortex communications

Published

2023/05/02

Authors

Li ZA, Samara A, Ray MK, Rutlin J, Raji CA, Shimony JS, Sun P, Song SK, Hershey T, Eisenstein SA

Keywords

diffusion MRI, hypothalamus, neuroinflammation, obesity, white matter

DOI

10.1093/texcom/tgad007
Toggle Association of Body Mass Index and Waist Circumference With Imaging Metrics of Brain Integrity and Functional Connectivity in Children Aged 9 to 10 Years in the US, 2016-2018. JAMA network open Kaltenhauser S, Weber CF, Lin H, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Aside from widely known cardiovascular implications, higher weight in children may have negative associations with brain microstructure and neurodevelopment.

Journal

JAMA network open

Published

2023/05/01

Authors

Kaltenhauser S, Weber CF, Lin H, Mozayan A, Malhotra A, Constable RT, Acosta JN, Falcone GJ, Taylor SN, Ment LR, Sheth KN, Payabvash S

Keywords

DOI

10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2023.14193
Toggle Associations of Co-occurring Symptom Trajectories With Sex, Race, Ethnicity, and Health Care Utilization in Children. JAMA network open Voepel-Lewis T, Senger-Carpenter T, Chen B, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Co-occurring physical and psychological symptoms during childhood and early adolescence may increase risk of symptom persistence into adulthood.

Journal

JAMA network open

Published

2023/05/01

Authors

Voepel-Lewis T, Senger-Carpenter T, Chen B, Seng J, Cofield C, Ploutz-Snyder R, Scott EL

Keywords

DOI

10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2023.14135
Toggle A general neuropsychopathological factor underlying many mental illnesses. Nature medicine 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Journal

Nature medicine

Published

2023/05/01

Authors

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41591-023-02319-2
Toggle Neurobiological Clusters Are Associated With Trajectories of Overall Psychopathology in Youth. Biological psychiatry. Cognitive neuroscience and neuroimaging Wang C, Hayes R, Roeder K, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Integrating multiple neuroimaging modalities to identify clusters of individuals and then associating these clusters with psychopathology is a promising approach for understanding neurobiological mechanisms that underlie psychopathology and the extent to which these features are associated with clinical symptoms.

Journal

Biological psychiatry. Cognitive neuroscience and neuroimaging

Published

2023/04/29

Authors

Wang C, Hayes R, Roeder K, Jalbrzikowski M

Keywords

CBCL score, Data fusion, Diffusion-weighted imaging, Neurodevelopment, Resting-state functional MRI, Structural MRI

DOI

10.1016/j.bpsc.2023.04.007
Toggle Person-centred Approaches to Psychopathology in the ABCD Study: Phenotypes and Neurocognitive Correlates. Research on child and adolescent psychopathology Retzler C, Hallam G, Johnson S, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Issues with classifying psychopathology using narrow diagnostic categories have prompted calls for the use of dimensional approaches. Yet questions remain about how closely dimensional approaches reflect the way symptoms cluster in individuals, whether known risk factors (e.g. preterm birth) produce distinct symptom phenotypes, and whether profiles reflecting symptom clusters are associated with neurocognitive factors. To identify distinct profiles of psychopathology, latent class analysis was applied to the syndrome scales of the parent-reported Child Behaviour Checklist for 11,381 9- and 10- year-olds from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study. Four classes were identified, reflecting different profiles, to which children were assigned probabilistically; Class 1 (88.6%) reflected optimal functioning; Class 2 (7.1%), predominantly internalising; Class 3 (2.4%), predominantly externalising; and Class 4 (1.9%), universal difficulties. To investigate the presence of a possible preterm behavioural phenotype, the proportion of participants allocated to each class was cross-tabulated with gestational age category. No profile was specific to preterm birth. Finally, to assess the neurocognitive factors associated with class membership, elastic net regressions were conducted revealing a relatively distinct set of neurocognitive factors associated with each class. Findings support the use of large datasets to identify psychopathological profiles, explore phenotypes, and identify associated neurocognitive factors.

Journal

Research on child and adolescent psychopathology

Published

2023/04/29

Authors

Retzler C, Hallam G, Johnson S, Retzler J

Keywords

Latent class, Neurocognitive predictors, Preterm behavioural phenotype, Psychopathology

DOI

10.1007/s10802-023-01065-w
Toggle Associations Between Preterm Birth, Inhibitory Control-Implicated Brain Regions and Tracts, and Inhibitory Control Task Performance in Children: Consideration of Socioeconomic Context. Child psychiatry and human development Taylor RL, Rogers CE, Smyser CD, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Preterm birth (PTB) is associated with increased risk for unfavorable outcomes such as deficits in attentional control and related brain structure alterations. Crucially, PTB is more likely to occur within the context of poverty. The current study examined associations between PTB and inhibitory control (IC) implicated brain regions/tracts and task performance, as well as the moderating role of early life poverty on the relation between PTB and IC-implicated regions/tracts/task performance. 2,899 children from the ABCD study were sampled for this study. Mixed effects models examined the relation between PTB and subsequent IC performance as well as prefrontal gray matter volume, white matter fractional anisotropy (FA), and mean diffusivity (MD). Household income was examined as a moderator. PTB was significantly associated with less improvement in IC task performance over time and decreased FA in left uncinate fasciculus (UF) and cingulum bundle (CB). Early life poverty moderated the relation between PTB and both CB FA and UF MD.

Journal

Child psychiatry and human development

Published

2023/04/29

Authors

Taylor RL, Rogers CE, Smyser CD, Barch DM

Keywords

Early life poverty, Inhibitory control, Neuroimaging, Preterm birth

DOI

10.1007/s10578-023-01531-y
Toggle Generalizability of 3D CNN models for age estimation in diverse youth populations using structural MRI. Scientific reports Mendes SL, Pinaya WHL, Pan PM, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Recently, several studies have investigated the neurodevelopment of psychiatric disorders using brain data acquired via structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI). These analyses have shown the potential of sMRI data to provide a relatively precise characterization of brain structural biomarkers. Despite these advances, a relatively unexplored question is how reliable and consistent a model is when assessing subjects from other independent datasets. In this study, we investigate the performance and generalizability of the same model architecture trained from distinct datasets comprising youths in diverse stages of neurodevelopment and with different mental health conditions. We employed models with the same 3D convolutional neural network (CNN) architecture to assess autism spectrum disorder (ASD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), brain age, and a measure of dimensional psychopathology, the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) total score. The investigated datasets include the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange II (ABIDE-II, N = 580), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD-200, N = 922), Brazilian High-Risk Cohort Study (BHRCS, N = 737), and Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD, N = 11,031). Models’ performance and interpretability were assessed within each dataset (for diagnosis tasks) and inter-datasets (for age estimation). Despite the demographic and phenotypic differences of the subjects, all models presented significant estimations for age (p value < 0.001) within and between datasets. In addition, most models showed a moderate to high correlation in age estimation. The results, including the models’ brain regions of interest (ROI), were analyzed and discussed in light of the youth neurodevelopmental structural changes. Among other interesting discoveries, we found that less confounded training datasets produce models with higher generalization capacity.

Journal

Scientific reports

Published

2023/04/27

Authors

Mendes SL, Pinaya WHL, Pan PM, Jackowski AP, Bressan RA, Sato JR

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41598-023-33920-7
Toggle Effect of maternal hypertensive disorder on their children's neurocognitive functioning in mediated via low birthweight and BMI not by brain cortical thickness. Applied neuropsychology. Child Ahmed S, Cano MÁ, Sánchez M, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

The aim of the study was to examine the association between prenatal exposure to maternal Hypertensive disorder during pregnancy (HDP) on brain structure and neurocognitive functioning (NCF) in singleton children aged between 9 and 10 years using the baseline wave of the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study. The ABCD Study interviewed each child (and their parents), measured NCF, and performed neuroimaging. Exposure to maternal high blood pressure (HBP) and preeclampsia or eclampsia (PE/EL) were extracted from the developmental history questionnaire. Differences in cortical thickness (CTh) and five cognitive abilities (two executive functions, working and episodic memory, processing speed, and two language abilities) between exposed and unexposed children were examined using generalized linear models. The mediating effects of CTh, birthweight, and BMI on the relationship between maternal HDP on NCF were also examined. A total of 584-children exposed to HBP, 387-children exposed to PE/EL, and 5,877 unexposed children were included in the analysis. Neither CTh nor NCF differed between the exposed and unexposed children with or without adjusting for the confounders including the child’s age, sex, race, education, and birth histories. The whole-brain CTh did not mediate the relationships between HDP and NCF. However, the relationship between HDP and most of the NCF was mediated by the child’s birthweight and BMI. Exposure to maternal HDP can affect their offspring’s later-life cognitive abilities via low birthweight and BMI during childhood. Prospective longitudinal studies, following up from infancy, are needed to further delineate the association of HDP on children’s cognitive abilities.

Journal

Applied neuropsychology. Child

Published

2023/04/26

Authors

Ahmed S, Cano MÁ, Sánchez M, Hu N, Gonzalez R, Ibañez G

Keywords

Birthweight, body mass index, cognition, cortical thickness, pregnancy hypertension

DOI

10.1080/21622965.2023.2206029
Toggle Genetic and Environmental Contributions to Subcortical Gray Matter Microstructure and Volume in the Developing Brain. Behavior genetics Watts R, Rader L, Grant J, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Using baseline (ages 9-10) and two-year follow-up (ages 11-12) data from monozygotic and dizygotic twins enrolled in the longitudinal Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study, we investigated the genetic and environmental contributions to microstructure and volume of nine subcortical gray matter regions. Microstructure was assessed using diffusion MRI data analyzed using restriction spectrum imaging (RSI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) models. The highest heritability estimates (estimate [95% confidence interval]) for microstructure were found using the RSI model in the pallidum (baseline: 0.859 [0.818, 0.889], follow-up: 0.835 [0.787, 0.871]), putamen (baseline: 0.859 [0.819, 0.889], follow-up: 0.874 [0.838, 0.902]), and thalamus (baseline: 0.855 [0.814, 0.887], follow-up: 0.819 [0.769, 0.857]). For volumes the corresponding regions were the caudate (baseline: 0.831 [0.688, 0.992], follow-up: 0.848 [0.701, 1.011]) and putamen (baseline: 0.906 [0.875, 0.914], follow-up: 0.906 [0.885, 0.923]). The subcortical regions displayed high genetic stability (rA = 0.743-1.000) across time and exhibited unique environmental correlations (rE = 0.194-0.610). Individual differences in both gray matter microstructure and volumes can be largely explained by additive genetic effects in this sample.

Journal

Behavior genetics

Published

2023/04/26

Authors

Watts R, Rader L, Grant J, Filippi CG

Keywords

Deep gray matter, Development, Diffusion MRI, Genetics

DOI

10.1007/s10519-023-10142-1
Toggle ABCD Behavior Genetics: Twin, Family, and Genomic Studies Using the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study Dataset. Behavior genetics Wilson S, Fan CC, Hewitt J 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Journal

Behavior genetics

Published

2023/04/25

Authors

Wilson S, Fan CC, Hewitt J

Keywords

DOI

10.1007/s10519-023-10144-z
Toggle Longitudinal alterations in brain morphometry mediated the effects of bullying victimization on cognitive development in preadolescents. Developmental cognitive neuroscience Menken MS, Rodriguez Rivera PJ, Isaiah A, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Bullying victimization is associated with a doubled risk of attempting suicide in adulthood. Two longitudinal brain morphometry studies identified the fusiform gyrus and putamen as vulnerable to bullying. No study identified how neural alterations may mediate the effect of bullying on cognition. We assessed participants with caregiver-reported bullying (N = 323) and matched non-bullied controls (N = 322) from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study dataset to identify changes in brain morphometry associated with ongoing bullying victimization over two years and determine whether such alterations mediated the effect of bullying on cognition. Bullied children (38.7% girls, 47.7% racial minorities, 9.88 ± 0.62 years at baseline) had poorer cognitive performance (P < 0.05), larger right hippocampus (P = 0.036), left entorhinal cortex, left superior parietal cortex, and right fusiform gyrus volumes (all P < 0.05), as well as larger surface areas in multiple other frontal, parietal, and occipital cortices. Thinner cortices were also found in the left hemisphere, particularly in the left temporal lobe, and right frontal region (all P < 0.05). Importantly, larger surface area in the fusiform cortices partially suppressed (12-16%), and thinner precentral cortices partially mitigated, (7%) the effect of bullying on cognition (P < 0.05). These findings highlight the negative impact of prolonged bullying victimization on brain morphometry and cognition.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2023/04/25

Authors

Menken MS, Rodriguez Rivera PJ, Isaiah A, Ernst T, Cloak CC, Chang L

Keywords

Brain morphometry, Bullying, Cognition, Mediation, Peer victimization

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2023.101247
Toggle Brainnetome atlas of preadolescent children based on anatomical connectivity profiles. Cerebral cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991) Li W, Fan L, Shi W, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

During the preadolescent period, when the cerebral thickness, curvature, and myelin are constantly changing, the brain’s regionalization patterns underwent persistent development, contributing to the continuous improvements of various higher cognitive functions. Using a brain atlas to study the development of these functions has attracted much attention. However, the brains of children do not always have the same topological patterns as those of adults. Therefore, age-specific brain mapping is particularly important, serving as a basic and indispensable tool to study the normal development of children. In this study, we took advantage of longitudinal data to create the brain atlas specifically for preadolescent children. The resulting human Child Brainnetome Atlas, with 188 cortical and 36 subcortical subregions, provides a precise period-specific and cross-validated version of the brain atlas that is more appropriate for adoption in the preadolescent period. In addition, we compared and illustrated for regions with different topological patterns in the child and adult atlases, providing a topologically consistent reference for subsequent research studying child and adolescent development.

Journal

Cerebral cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991)

Published

2023/04/25

Authors

Li W, Fan L, Shi W, Lu Y, Li J, Luo N, Wang H, Chu C, Ma L, Song M, Li K, Cheng L, Cao L, Jiang T

Keywords

Brainnetome atlas, anatomical connectivity, development, diffusion magnetic resonance imaging, preadolescent child

DOI

10.1093/cercor/bhac415
Toggle Genotype Data and Derived Genetic Instruments of Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study for Better Understanding of Human Brain Development. Behavior genetics Fan CC, Loughnan R, Wilson S, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

The data release of Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study represents an extensive resource for investigating factors relating to child development and mental wellbeing. The genotype data of ABCD has been used extensively in the context of genetic analysis, including genome-wide association studies and polygenic score predictions. However, there are unique opportunities provided by ABCD genetic data that have not yet been fully tapped. The diverse genomic variability, the enriched relatedness among ABCD subsets, and the longitudinal design of the ABCD challenge researchers to perform novel analyses to gain deeper insight into human brain development. Genetic instruments derived from the ABCD genetic data, such as genetic principal components, can help to better control confounds beyond the context of genetic analyses. To facilitate the use genomic information in the ABCD for inference, we here detail the processing procedures, quality controls, general characteristics, and the corresponding resources in the ABCD genotype data of release 4.0.

Journal

Behavior genetics

Published

2023/04/24

Authors

Fan CC, Loughnan R, Wilson S, Hewitt JK

Keywords

ABCD, Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study, Data release, Genetic, Genomic, Genotyping

DOI

10.1007/s10519-023-10143-0
Toggle A shared neural basis underlying psychiatric comorbidity. Nature medicine Xie C, Xiang S, Shen C, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Recent studies proposed a general psychopathology factor underlying common comorbidities among psychiatric disorders. However, its neurobiological mechanisms and generalizability remain elusive. In this study, we used a large longitudinal neuroimaging cohort from adolescence to young adulthood (IMAGEN) to define a neuropsychopathological (NP) factor across externalizing and internalizing symptoms using multitask connectomes. We demonstrate that this NP factor might represent a unified, genetically determined, delayed development of the prefrontal cortex that further leads to poor executive function. We also show this NP factor to be reproducible in multiple developmental periods, from preadolescence to early adulthood, and generalizable to the resting-state connectome and clinical samples (the ADHD-200 Sample and the Stratify Project). In conclusion, we identify a reproducible and general neural basis underlying symptoms of multiple mental health disorders, bridging multidimensional evidence from behavioral, neuroimaging and genetic substrates. These findings may help to develop new therapeutic interventions for psychiatric comorbidities.

Journal

Nature medicine

Published

2023/04/24

Authors

Xie C, Xiang S, Shen C, Peng X, Kang J, Li Y, Cheng W, He S, Bobou M, Broulidakis MJ, van Noort BM, Zhang Z, Robinson L, Vaidya N, Winterer J, Zhang Y, King S, Banaschewski T, Barker GJ, Bokde ALW, Bromberg U, Büchel C, Flor H, Grigis A, Garavan H, Gowland P, Heinz A, Ittermann B, Lemaître H, Martinot JL, Martinot MP, Nees F, Orfanos DP, Paus T, Poustka L, Fröhner JH, Schmidt U, Sinclair J, Smolka MN, Stringaris A, Walter H, Whelan R, Desrivières S, Sahakian BJ, Robbins TW, Schumann G, Jia T, Feng J

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41591-023-02317-4
Toggle Bedtime screen use behaviors and sleep outcomes: Findings from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study. Sleep health Nagata JM, Singh G, Yang JH, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

To determine associations between bedtime screen time behaviors and sleep outcomes in a national study of early adolescents.

Journal

Sleep health

Published

2023/04/23

Authors

Nagata JM, Singh G, Yang JH, Smith N, Kiss O, Ganson KT, Testa A, Jackson DB, Baker FC

Keywords

Adolescent, Digital technology, Mobile phone, Screen time, Sleep

DOI

10.1016/j.sleh.2023.02.005
Toggle A somato-cognitive action network alternates with effector regions in motor cortex. Nature Gordon EM, Chauvin RJ, Van AN, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Motor cortex (M1) has been thought to form a continuous somatotopic homunculus extending down the precentral gyrus from foot to face representations, despite evidence for concentric functional zones and maps of complex actions. Here, using precision functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) methods, we find that the classic homunculus is interrupted by regions with distinct connectivity, structure and function, alternating with effector-specific (foot, hand and mouth) areas. These inter-effector regions exhibit decreased cortical thickness and strong functional connectivity to each other, as well as to the cingulo-opercular network (CON), critical for action and physiological control, arousal, errors and pain. This interdigitation of action control-linked and motor effector regions was verified in the three largest fMRI datasets. Macaque and pediatric (newborn, infant and child) precision fMRI suggested cross-species homologues and developmental precursors of the inter-effector system. A battery of motor and action fMRI tasks documented concentric effector somatotopies, separated by the CON-linked inter-effector regions. The inter-effectors lacked movement specificity and co-activated during action planning (coordination of hands and feet) and axial body movement (such as of the abdomen or eyebrows). These results, together with previous studies demonstrating stimulation-evoked complex actions and connectivity to internal organs such as the adrenal medulla, suggest that M1 is punctuated by a system for whole-body action planning, the somato-cognitive action network (SCAN). In M1, two parallel systems intertwine, forming an integrate-isolate pattern: effector-specific regions (foot, hand and mouth) for isolating fine motor control and the SCAN for integrating goals, physiology and body movement.

Journal

Nature

Published

2023/04/19

Authors

Gordon EM, Chauvin RJ, Van AN, Rajesh A, Nielsen A, Newbold DJ, Lynch CJ, Seider NA, Krimmel SR, Scheidter KM, Monk J, Miller RL, Metoki A, Montez DF, Zheng A, Elbau I, Madison T, Nishino T, Myers MJ, Kaplan S, Badke D'Andrea C, Demeter DV, Feigelis M, Ramirez JSB, Xu T, Barch DM, Smyser CD, Rogers CE, Zimmermann J, Botteron KN, Pruett JR, Willie JT, Brunner P, Shimony JS, Kay BP, Marek S, Norris SA, Gratton C, Sylvester CM, Power JD, Liston C, Greene DJ, Roland JL, Petersen SE, Raichle ME, Laumann TO, Fair DA, Dosenbach NUF

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41586-023-05964-2
Toggle Superficial white matter across development, young adulthood, and aging: volume, thickness, and relationship with cortical features. Brain structure & function Schilling KG, Archer D, Rheault F, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Superficial white matter (SWM) represents a significantly understudied part of the human brain, despite comprising a large portion of brain volume and making up a majority of cortico-cortical white matter connections. Using multiple, high-quality datasets with large sample sizes (N = 2421, age range 5-100) in combination with methodological advances in tractography, we quantified features of SWM volume and thickness across the brain and across development, young adulthood, and aging. We had four primary aims: (1) characterize SWM thickness across brain regions (2) describe associations between SWM volume and age (3) describe associations between SWM thickness and age, and (4) quantify relationships between SWM thickness and cortical features. Our main findings are that (1) SWM thickness varies across the brain, with patterns robust across individuals and across the population at the region-level and vertex-level; (2) SWM volume shows unique volumetric trajectories with age that are distinct from gray matter and other white matter trajectories; (3) SWM thickness shows nonlinear cross-sectional changes across the lifespan that vary across regions; and (4) SWM thickness is associated with features of cortical thickness and curvature. For the first time, we show that SWM volume follows a similar trend as overall white matter volume, peaking at a similar time in adolescence, leveling off throughout adulthood, and decreasing with age thereafter. Notably, the relative fraction of total brain volume of SWM continuously increases with age, and consequently takes up a larger proportion of total white matter volume, unlike the other tissue types that decrease with respect to total brain volume. This study represents the first characterization of SWM features across the large portion of the lifespan and provides the background for characterizing normal aging and insight into the mechanisms associated with SWM development and decline.

Journal

Brain structure & function

Published

2023/04/19

Authors

Schilling KG, Archer D, Rheault F, Lyu I, Huo Y, Cai LY, Bunge SA, Weiner KS, Gore JC, Anderson AW, Landman BA

Keywords

Aging, Development, Lifespan, Superficial white matter, Tractography, U-fibers

DOI

10.1007/s00429-023-02642-x
Toggle A Phenome-Wide Association Study (PheWAS) of Late Onset Alzheimer Disease Genetic Risk in Children of European Ancestry at Middle Childhood: Results from the ABCD Study. Behavior genetics Gorelik AJ, Paul SE, Karcher NR, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Genetic risk for Late Onset Alzheimer Disease (AD) has been associated with lower cognition and smaller hippocampal volume in healthy young adults. However, whether these and other associations are present during childhood remains unclear. Using data from 5556 genomically-confirmed European ancestry youth who completed the baseline session of the ongoing the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study (ABCD Study®), our phenome-wide association study estimating associations between four indices of genetic risk for late-onset AD (i.e., AD polygenic risk scores (PRS), APOE rs429358 genotype, AD PRS with the APOE region removed (AD), and an interaction between AD and APOE genotype) and 1687 psychosocial, behavioral, and neural phenotypes revealed no significant associations after correction for multiple testing (all ps > 0.0002; all p > 0.07). These data suggest that AD genetic risk may not phenotypically manifest during middle-childhood or that effects are smaller than this sample is powered to detect.

Journal

Behavior genetics

Published

2023/04/18

Authors

Gorelik AJ, Paul SE, Karcher NR, Johnson EC, Nagella I, Blaydon L, Modi H, Hansen IS, Colbert SMC, Baranger DAA, Norton SA, Spears I, Gordon B, Zhang W, Hill PL, Oltmanns TF, Bijsterbosch JD, Agrawal A, Hatoum AS, Bogdan R

Keywords

APOE, Alzheimer disease, Imaging, Middle childhood, Phenome-wide association study, Polygenic risk scores

DOI

10.1007/s10519-023-10140-3
Toggle Prevalence and Correlates of Mental Disorders in Children Aged 9 and 10 Years: Results From the ABCD Study. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Olfson M, Wall MM, Wang S, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

To estimate the prevalence of current DSM-5 disorders in children 9 to 10 years of age and their associations with sociodemographic and physical characteristics.

Journal

Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

Published

2023/04/14

Authors

Olfson M, Wall MM, Wang S, Blanco C

Keywords

mental health disorders, psychiatric epidemiology, risk factors

DOI

10.1016/j.jaac.2023.04.005
Toggle Early path dominance as a principle for neurodevelopment. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Razban RM, Pachter JA, Dill KA, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

We perform targeted attack, a systematic computational unlinking of the network, to analyze its effects on global communication across the brain network through its giant cluster. Across diffusion magnetic resonance images from individuals in the UK Biobank, Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study and Developing Human Connectome Project, we find that targeted attack procedures on increasing white matter tract lengths and densities are remarkably invariant to aging and disease. Time-reversing the attack computation suggests a mechanism for how brains develop, for which we derive an analytical equation using percolation theory. Based on a close match between theory and experiment, our results demonstrate that tracts are limited to emanate from regions already in the giant cluster and tracts that appear earliest in neurodevelopment are those that become the longest and densest.

Journal

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Published

2023/04/13

Authors

Razban RM, Pachter JA, Dill KA, Mujica-Parodi LR

Keywords

connectomics, dMRI, network neuroscience, percolation theory, statistical mechanics

DOI

10.1073/pnas.2218007120
Toggle Associations of bullying perpetration and peer victimization subtypes with preadolescent's suicidality, non-suicidal self-injury, neurocognition, and brain development. BMC medicine Wen X, Shu Y, Qu D, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Although both peer victimization and bullying perpetration negatively impact preadolescents’ development, the underlying neurobiological mechanism of this adverse relationship remains unclear. Besides, the specific psycho-cognitive patterns of different bullying subtypes also need further exploration, warranting large-scale studies on both general bullying and specific bullying subtypes.

Journal

BMC medicine

Published

2023/04/12

Authors

Wen X, Shu Y, Qu D, Wang Y, Cui Z, Zhang X, Chen R

Keywords

Brain network, Bullying, NSSI, Subtype, Suicide

DOI

10.1186/s12916-023-02808-8
Toggle Differential Item Functioning in Reports of Delinquent Behavior Between Black and White Youth: Evidence of Measurement Bias in Self-Reports of Arrest in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study. Assessment Brislin SJ, Clark DA, Clark DB, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Youth self-reports are a mainstay of delinquency assessment; however, making valid inferences about delinquency using these assessments requires equivalent measurement across groups of theoretical interest. We examined whether a brief 10-item delinquency measure exhibited measurement invariance across non-Hispanic White ( = 6,064) and Black ( = 1,666) youth (ages 10-11 years old) in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study (ABCD Study®). We detected differential item functioning (DIF) in two items. Black youth were more likely to report being arrested or picked up by police than White youth with the same score on the latent delinquency trait. Although multiple covariates (income, urgency, and callous-unemotional traits) reduced mean-level difference in overall delinquency, they were generally unrelated to the DIF in the Arrest item. However, the DIF in the Arrest item was reduced in size and no longer significant after adjusting for neighborhood safety. Results illustrate the importance of considering measurement invariance when using self-reported delinquency scores to draw inferences about group differences, and the utility of measurement invariance analyses for helping to identify mechanisms that contribute to group differences generally.

Journal

Assessment

Published

2023/04/11

Authors

Brislin SJ, Clark DA, Clark DB, Durbin CE, Parr AC, Ahonen L, Anderson-Carpenter KD, Heitzeg MM, Luna B, Sripada C, Zucker RA, Hicks BM

Keywords

adolescent brain cognitive development study, delinquency, differential item functioning, measurement bias, racial group differences

DOI

10.1177/10731911231164627
Toggle Associations Between Adolescent Pain and Psychopathology in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study. Behavior genetics Rader L, Freis SM, Friedman NP 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Pain and psychopathology co-occur in adolescence, but the directionality and etiology of these associations are unclear. Using the pain questionnaire and the Child Behavior Checklist from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study (n = 10,414 children [770 twin pairs] aged 12-13), we estimated longitudinal, co-twin control, and twin models to evaluate the nature of these associations. In two-wave cross-lag panel models, there were small cross-lag effects that suggested bidirectional associations. However, the co-twin control models suggested that most associations were familial. Pain at age 12 and 13 was mostly environmental (A = 0-12%, C = 15-30%, E = 70-73%) and the twin models suggested that associations with psychopathology were primarily due to shared environmental correlations. The exception was externalizing, which had a phenotypic prospective effect on pain, a significant within-family component, and a non-shared environmental correlation at age 12. Environmental risk factors may play a role in pain-psychopathology co-occurrence. Future studies can examine risk factors such as stressful life events.

Journal

Behavior genetics

Published

2023/04/10

Authors

Rader L, Freis SM, Friedman NP

Keywords

Adolescent, Co-twin control, Environmental correlation, Pain, Psychopathology

DOI

10.1007/s10519-023-10138-x
Toggle Brain structure, phenotypic and genetic correlates of reading performance. Nature human behaviour Carrión-Castillo A, Paz-Alonso PM, Carreiras M 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Reading is an evolutionarily recent development that recruits and tunes brain circuitry connecting primary- and language-processing regions. We investigated whether metrics of the brain’s physical structure correlate with reading performance and whether genetic variants affect this relationship. To this aim, we used the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development dataset (n = 9,013) of 9-10-year-olds and focused on 150 measures of cortical surface area (CSA) and thickness. Our results reveal that reading performance is associated with nine measures of brain structure including relevant regions of the reading network. Furthermore, we show that this relationship is partially mediated by genetic factors for two of these measures: the CSA of the entire left hemisphere and, specifically, of the left superior temporal gyrus CSA. These effects emphasize the complex and subtle interplay between genes, brain and reading, which is a partly heritable polygenic skill that relies on a distributed network.

Journal

Nature human behaviour

Published

2023/04/10

Authors

Carrión-Castillo A, Paz-Alonso PM, Carreiras M

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41562-023-01583-z
Toggle Heritability Estimation of Cognitive Phenotypes in the ABCD Study Using Mixed Models. Behavior genetics Smith DM, Loughnan R, Friedman NP, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Twin and family studies have historically aimed to partition phenotypic variance into components corresponding to additive genetic effects (A), common environment (C), and unique environment (E). Here we present the ACE Model and several extensions in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development℠ Study (ABCD Study), employed using the new Fast Efficient Mixed Effects Analysis (FEMA) package. In the twin sub-sample (n = 924; 462 twin pairs), heritability estimates were similar to those reported by prior studies for height (twin heritability = 0.86) and cognition (twin heritability between 0.00 and 0.61), respectively. Incorporating SNP-derived genetic relatedness and using the full ABCD Study sample (n = 9,742) led to narrower confidence intervals for all parameter estimates. By leveraging the sparse clustering method used by FEMA to handle genetic relatedness only for participants within families, we were able to take advantage of the diverse distribution of genetic relatedness within the ABCD Study sample.

Journal

Behavior genetics

Published

2023/04/07

Authors

Smith DM, Loughnan R, Friedman NP, Parekh P, Frei O, Thompson WK, Andreassen OA, Neale M, Jernigan TL, Dale AM

Keywords

Cognition, Height, Heritability, Mixed models, Random effects, Twin studies

DOI

10.1007/s10519-023-10141-2
Toggle Associations Between Gender Nonconformity, School Environments, Family Conflict, and Emotional and Behavioral Health Among Children Ages 10-11. The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine Loso HM, Locke Dube S, Chaarani B, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

In youth, gender nonconformity (GNC; gender expression that differs from stereotypes based on assigned sex at birth) is associated with a higher likelihood of peer and caregiver victimization and rejection. However, few studies have examined the relationship between GNC, overall family conflict, perceptions of school environment, and emotional and behavioral health problems among children ages 10-11.

Journal

The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine

Published

2023/04/07

Authors

Loso HM, Locke Dube S, Chaarani B, Ivanova M, Garavan H, Johns MM, Potter AS

Keywords

ABCD, Gender nonconformity, Preadolescents

DOI

10.1016/j.jadohealth.2023.02.008
Toggle Brain-Based Predictions of Psychiatric Illness-Linked Behaviors Across the Sexes. Biological psychiatry Dhamala E, Rong Ooi LQ, Chen J, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Individual differences in functional brain connectivity can be used to predict both the presence of psychiatric illness and variability in associated behaviors. However, despite evidence for sex differences in functional network connectivity and in the prevalence, presentation, and trajectory of psychiatric illnesses, the extent to which disorder-relevant aspects of network connectivity are shared or unique across the sexes remains to be determined.

Journal

Biological psychiatry

Published

2023/04/07

Authors

Dhamala E, Rong Ooi LQ, Chen J, Ricard JA, Berkeley E, Chopra S, Qu Y, Zhang XH, Lawhead C, Yeo BTT, Holmes AJ

Keywords

Brain-based predictions, Functional connectivity, Neuroimaging, Prediction psychiatry, Sex differences, Transdiagnostic

DOI

10.1016/j.biopsych.2023.03.025
Toggle Associations with youth psychotic-like experiences over time: Evidence for trans-symptom and specific cognitive and neural risk factors. Journal of psychopathology and clinical science Karcher NR, Merchant J, Rappaport BI, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

The current study examined whether impairments in cognitive and neural factors at baseline (ages 9-10) predict initial levels or changes in psychotic-like experiences (PLEs) and whether such impairments generalize to other psychopathology symptoms (i.e., internalizing and externalizing symptoms). Using unique longitudinal Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study data, the study examined three time points from ages 9 to 13. Univariate latent growth models examined associations between baseline cognitive and neural metrics with symptom measures using discovery ( = 5,926) and replication ( = 5,952) data sets. For symptom measures (i.e., PLEs, internalizing, externalizing), we examined mean initial levels (i.e., intercepts) and changes over time (i.e., slopes). Predictors included neuropsychological test performance, global structural MRI, and several a priori within-network resting-state functional connectivity metrics. Results showed a pattern whereby baseline cognitive and brain metric impairments showed the strongest associations with PLEs over time. Lower cognitive, volume, surface area, and cingulo-opercular within-network connectivity metrics showed associations with increased PLEs and higher initial levels of externalizing and internalizing symptoms. Several metrics were uniquely associated with PLEs, including lower cortical thickness with higher initial PLEs and lower default mode network connectivity with increased PLEs slopes. Neural and cognitive impairments in middle childhood were broadly associated with increased PLEs over time, and showed stronger associations with PLEs compared with other psychopathology symptoms. The current study also identified markers potentially uniquely associated with PLEs (e.g., cortical thickness). Impairments in broad cognitive metrics, brain volume and surface area, and a network associated with information integration may represent risk factors for general psychopathology. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved).

Journal

Journal of psychopathology and clinical science

Published

2023/04/06

Authors

Karcher NR, Merchant J, Rappaport BI, Barch DM

Keywords

DOI

10.1037/abn0000820
Toggle Comparing Pruning and Thresholding with Continuous Shrinkage Polygenic Score Methods in a Large Sample of Ancestrally Diverse Adolescents from the ABCD Study. Behavior genetics Ahern J, Thompson W, Fan CC, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Using individuals’ genetic data researchers can generate Polygenic Scores (PS) that are able to predict risk for diseases, variability in different behaviors as well as anthropomorphic measures. This is achieved by leveraging models learned from previously published large Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWASs) associating locations in the genome with a phenotype of interest. Previous GWASs have predominantly been performed in European ancestry individuals. This is of concern as PS generated in samples with a different ancestry to the original training GWAS have been shown to have lower performance and limited portability, and many efforts are now underway to collect genetic databases on individuals of diverse ancestries. In this study, we compare multiple methods of generating PS, including pruning and thresholding and Bayesian continuous shrinkage models, to determine which of them is best able to overcome these limitations. To do this we use the ABCD Study, a longitudinal cohort with deep phenotyping on individuals of diverse ancestry. We generate PS for anthropometric and psychiatric phenotypes using previously published GWAS summary statistics and examine their performance in three subsamples of ABCD: African ancestry individuals (n = 811), European ancestry Individuals (n = 6703), and admixed ancestry individuals (n = 3664). We find that the single ancestry continuous shrinkage method, PRScs (CS), and the multi ancestry meta method, PRScsx Meta (CSx Meta), show the best performance across ancestries and phenotypes.

Journal

Behavior genetics

Published

2023/04/05

Authors

Ahern J, Thompson W, Fan CC, Loughnan R

Keywords

ABCD, Admixed, Adolescent, Continuous shrinkage, Diverse, Polygenic score

DOI

10.1007/s10519-023-10139-w
Toggle Food insecurity and binge-eating disorder in early adolescence. The International journal of eating disorders Nagata JM, Chu J, Cervantez L, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Food insecurity is defined as lack of consistent access to adequate food for healthy living. The objective of this study was to determine the associations between food insecurity and binge-eating disorder in a national cohort of 9- to 14-year-old children.

Journal

The International journal of eating disorders

Published

2023/04/04

Authors

Nagata JM, Chu J, Cervantez L, Ganson KT, Testa A, Jackson DB, Murray SB, Weiser SD

Keywords

adolescent health, binge eating, binge-eating disorder, food insecurity

DOI

10.1002/eat.23944
Toggle Excess BMI in early adolescence adversely impacts maturating functional circuits supporting high-level cognition and their structural correlates. International journal of obesity (2005) Brooks SJ, Smith C, Stamoulis C 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Adverse effects of excess BMI (affecting 1 in 5 children in the US) on brain circuits during neurodevelopmentally vulnerable periods are incompletely understood. This study investigated BMI-related alterations in maturating functional networks and their underlying brain structures, and high-level cognition in early adolescence.

Journal

International journal of obesity (2005)

Published

2023/04/03

Authors

Brooks SJ, Smith C, Stamoulis C

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41366-023-01303-7
Toggle Treatment of US Children With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study. JAMA network open Olfson M, Wall MM, Wang S, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Characterizing the extent and pattern of unmet needs for treatment of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) could help target efforts to improve access to ADHD medications and outpatient mental health care.

Journal

JAMA network open

Published

2023/04/03

Authors

Olfson M, Wall MM, Wang S, Laje G, Blanco C

Keywords

DOI

10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2023.10999
Toggle A systems science approach to identifying data gaps in national data sources on adolescent suicidal ideation and suicide attempt in the United States. BMC public health Giabbanelli PJ, Rice KL, Nataraj N, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Suicide is currently the second leading cause of death among adolescents ages 10-14, and third leading cause of death among adolescents ages 15-19 in the United States (U.S). Although we have numerous U.S. based surveillance systems and survey data sources, the coverage offered by these data with regard to the complexity of youth suicide had yet to be examined. The recent release of a comprehensive systems map for adolescent suicide provides an opportunity to contrast the content of surveillance systems and surveys with the mechanisms listed in the map.

Journal

BMC public health

Published

2023/04/01

Authors

Giabbanelli PJ, Rice KL, Nataraj N, Brown MM, Harper CR

Keywords

Causal map, Data collection, Surveillance system, Youth suicide

DOI

10.1186/s12889-023-15320-8
Toggle Reaction Time Variability in Children Is Specifically Associated With Attention Problems and Regional White Matter Microstructure. Biological psychiatry. Cognitive neuroscience and neuroimaging Wiker T, Norbom LB, Beck D, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Increased intraindividual variability (IIV) in reaction times (RTs) has been suggested as a key cognitive and behavioral marker of attention problems, but findings for other dimensions of psychopathology are less consistent. Moreover, while studies have linked IIV to brain white matter microstructure, large studies testing the robustness of these associations are needed.

Journal

Biological psychiatry. Cognitive neuroscience and neuroimaging

Published

2023/03/30

Authors

Wiker T, Norbom LB, Beck D, Agartz I, Andreassen OA, Alnæs D, Dahl A, Eilertsen EM, Moberget T, Ystrøm E, Westlye LT, Lebel C, Huster RJ, Tamnes CK

Keywords

Attention problems, Diffusion MRI, Psychopathology, Reaction time, Variability, White matter

DOI

10.1016/j.bpsc.2023.03.010
Toggle Effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on screen time and sleep in early adolescents. Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association Kiss O, Nagata JM, de Zambotti M, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

During the COVID-19 pandemic, adolescents and families have turned to online activities and social platforms more than ever to maintain well-being, connect remotely with friends and family, and online schooling. However, excessive screen use can have negative effects on health (e.g., sleep). This study examined changes in sleep habits and recreational screen time (social media, video gaming), and their relationship, before and across the first year of the pandemic in adolescents in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study.

Journal

Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association

Published

2023/03/27

Authors

Kiss O, Nagata JM, de Zambotti M, Dick AS, Marshall AT, Sowell ER, Van Rinsveld A, Guillaume M, Pelham WE, Gonzalez MR, Brown SA, Dowling GJ, Lisdahl KM, Tapert SF, Baker FC

Keywords

DOI

10.1037/hea0001251
Toggle Using synthetic MR images for distortion correction. Developmental cognitive neuroscience Montez DF, Van AN, Miller RL, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Functional MRI (fMRI) data acquired using echo-planar imaging (EPI) are highly distorted by magnetic field inhomogeneities. Distortion and differences in image contrast between EPI and T1-weighted and T2-weighted (T1w/T2w) images makes their alignment a challenge. Typically, field map data are used to correct EPI distortions. Alignments achieved with field maps can vary greatly and depends on the quality of field map data. However, many public datasets lack field map data entirely. Additionally, reliable field map data is often difficult to acquire in high-motion pediatric or developmental cohorts. To address this, we developed Synth, a software package for distortion correction and cross-modal image registration that does not require field map data. Synth combines information from T1w and T2w anatomical images to construct an idealized undistorted synthetic image with similar contrast properties to EPI data. This synthetic image acts as an effective reference for individual-specific distortion correction. Using pediatric (ABCD: Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development) and adult (MSC: Midnight Scan Club; HCP: Human Connectome Project) data, we demonstrate that Synth performs comparably to field map distortion correction approaches, and often outperforms them. Field map-less distortion correction with Synth allows accurate and precise registration of fMRI data with missing or corrupted field map information.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2023/03/24

Authors

Montez DF, Van AN, Miller RL, Seider NA, Marek S, Zheng A, Newbold DJ, Scheidter K, Feczko E, Perrone AJ, Miranda-Dominguez O, Earl EA, Kay BP, Jha AK, Sotiras A, Laumann TO, Greene DJ, Gordon EM, Tisdall MD, van der Kouwe A, Fair DA, Dosenbach NUF

Keywords

Distortion correction, EPI, Field map, Registration, fMRI

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2023.101234
Toggle Facets of impulsivity and reward in relation to binge-eating disorder course of illness among children: findings from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study. Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines Smith KE, Wang WL, Mason TB 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

The present study examined facets of impulsivity and reward sensitivity [as measured by the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale and Behavioral Activation and Behavioral Inhibition Scales (BIS/BAS)] as multivariable predictors of subsequent binge-eating disorder (BED) course of illness in middle childhood.

Journal

Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines

Published

2023/03/23

Authors

Smith KE, Wang WL, Mason TB

Keywords

Binge eating, eating disorder, impulsivity, personality, reward sensitivity, risk factors

DOI

10.1111/jcpp.13789
Toggle Associations between sexual orientation and early adolescent screen use: findings from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study. Annals of epidemiology Nagata JM, Lee CM, Yang J, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

To assess the association between sexual orientation and screen use (screen time and problematic screen use) in a demographically diverse national sample of early adolescents in the United States.

Journal

Annals of epidemiology

Published

2023/03/23

Authors

Nagata JM, Lee CM, Yang J, Al-Shoaibi AAA, Ganson KT, Testa A, Jackson DB

Keywords

Adolescent, Bisexual, Gay, LGBTQ+, Lesbian, Screen time, Social media, Video games

DOI

10.1016/j.annepidem.2023.03.004
Toggle Triangulating causality between childhood obesity and neurobehavior: Behavioral genetic and longitudinal evidence. Developmental science Kulisch LK, Arumäe K, Briley DA, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Childhood obesity is a serious health concern that is not yet fully understood. Previous research has linked obesity with neurobehavioral factors such as behavior, cognition, and brain morphology. The causal directions of these relationships remain mostly untested. We filled this gap by using the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study cohort comprising 11,875 children aged 9-10. First, correlations between the age- and sex-specific 95th BMI percentile (%BMIp95) and neurobehavioral measures were cross-sectionally analyzed. Effects were then aggregated by neurobehavioral domain for causal analyses. Behavioral genetic Direction of Causation modeling was used to test the direction of each relationship. Findings were validated by longitudinal cross-lagged panel modeling. %BMIp95 correlated with impulsivity, motivation, psychopathology, eating behavior, and cognitive tests (executive functioning, language, memory, perception, working memory). Greater %BMIp95 was also associated with reduced cortical thickness in frontal and temporal brain areas but with increased thickness in parietal and occipital areas. Similar although weaker patterns emerged for cortical surface area and volume. Behavioral genetic modeling suggested causal effects of %BMIp95 on eating behavior (β = 0.26), cognition (β = 0.05), cortical thickness (β = 0.15), and cortical surface area (β = 0.07). Personality/psychopathology (β = 0.09) and eating behavior (β = 0.16) appeared to influence %BMIp95. Longitudinal evidence broadly supported these findings. Results regarding cortical volume were inconsistent. Results supported causal effects of obesity on brain functioning and morphology. The present study highlights the importance of physical health for brain development and may inform interventions aimed at preventing or reducing pediatric obesity. RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS: A continuous measure related to obesity, %BMIp95, has correlations with various measures of brain functioning and structure Behavioral genetic and longitudinal modeling suggest causal links from personality, psychopathology, and eating behavior to %BMIp95 Results also indicate directional links from %BMIp95 to eating behavior, cognition, cortical thickness, and cortical surface area Obesity may play a role for healthy brain development during childhood.

Journal

Developmental science

Published

2023/03/23

Authors

Kulisch LK, Arumäe K, Briley DA, Vainik U

Keywords

behavioral genetics, body mass index, causality, childhood obesity, longitudinal analysis, neurobehavior

DOI

10.1111/desc.13392
Toggle Breastfeeding duration is associated with larger cortical gray matter volumes in children from the ABCD study. Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines Núñez C, García-Alix A, Arca G, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Despite the numerous studies in favor of breastfeeding for its benefits in cognition and mental health, the long-term effects of breastfeeding on brain structure are still largely unknown. Our main objective was to study the relationship between breastfeeding duration and cerebral gray matter volumes. We also explored the potential mediatory role of brain volumes on behavior.

Journal

Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines

Published

2023/03/22

Authors

Núñez C, García-Alix A, Arca G, Agut T, Carreras N, Portella MJ, Stephan-Otto C

Keywords

Breastfeeding, behavior, brain structure, magnetic resonance imaging

DOI

10.1111/jcpp.13790
Toggle Predicting childhood ADHD-linked symptoms from prenatal and perinatal data in the ABCD cohort. Development and psychopathology Dooley N, Healy C, Cotter D, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

This study investigates the capacity of pre/perinatal factors to predict attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms in childhood. It also explores whether predictive accuracy of a pre/perinatal model varies for different groups in the population. We used the ABCD (Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development) cohort from the United States ( = 9975). Pre/perinatal information and the Child Behavior Checklist were reported by the parent when the child was aged 9-10. Forty variables which are generally known by birth were input as potential predictors including maternal substance-use, obstetric complications and child demographics. Elastic net regression with 5-fold validation was performed, and subsequently stratified by sex, race/ethnicity, household income and parental psychopathology. Seventeen pre/perinatal variables were identified as robust predictors of ADHD symptoms in this cohort. The model explained just 8.13% of the variance in ADHD symptoms on average (95% CI = 5.6%-11.5%). Predictive accuracy of the model varied significantly by subgroup, particularly across income groups, and several pre/perinatal factors appeared to be sex-specific. Results suggest we may be able to predict childhood ADHD symptoms with modest accuracy from birth. This study needs to be replicated using prospectively measured pre/perinatal data.

Journal

Development and psychopathology

Published

2023/03/22

Authors

Dooley N, Healy C, Cotter D, Clarke M, Cannon M

Keywords

attention-deficit disorder with hyperactivity, fetal development, maternal behavior, pregnancy complications, sex differences, social determinants of health

DOI

10.1017/S0954579423000238
Toggle Youth Screen Media Activity Patterns and Associations With Behavioral Developmental Measures and Resting-state Brain Functional Connectivity. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Song K, Zhang JL, Zhou N, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Screen media activity (SMA) consumes considerable time in youth’s lives, raising concerns about the effects it may have on youth development. Disentangling mixed associations between SMA of youth and developmental measures should move beyond overall screen time and consider types and patterns of SMA. This study aimed to identify reliable and generalizable SMA patterns among youth and examine their associations with behavioral developmental measures and developing brain functional connectivity.

Journal

Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

Published

2023/03/22

Authors

Song K, Zhang JL, Zhou N, Fu Y, Zou B, Xu LX, Wang Z, Li X, Zhao Y, Potenza M, Fang X, Zhang JT

Keywords

addictive behaviors, cognition, resting-state functional connectivity, screen media activity, youth

DOI

10.1016/j.jaac.2023.02.014
Toggle Sexual Orientation Disparities in Early Adolescent Sleep: Findings from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study. LGBT health Nagata JM, Lee CM, Yang JH, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine associations between sexual minority status (e.g., gay or bisexual) and sleep problems in a demographically diverse, national sample of U.S. early adolescents. We analyzed cross-sectional data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study (Year 2, 2018-2020) to estimate associations between sexual orientation and sleep problems or disturbance, adjusting for confounders and testing potential mediators (depressive problems, stress problems, family conflict, and parental monitoring). In a sample of 8563 adolescents 10- to 14-years-old, 4.4% identified as sexual minority individuals. Sexual minority status was associated with self-reported trouble falling or staying asleep (risk ratio [RR] = 2.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.88-2.68) and caregiver-reported sleep disturbance (RR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.29-1.75). The association between sexual minority status and trouble falling or staying asleep was partially mediated by greater depressive problems, more family conflict, and less parental monitoring, whereas the association between sexual minority status and caregiver-reported sleep disturbance was partially mediated by greater depressive problems, higher stress, and greater family conflict. Our results indicate that sexual minority status may be linked to sleep disturbance in early adolescence. Depressive problems, stress, family conflict, and less parental monitoring partially mediate disparities in sleep health for sexual minority youth. Future research could test interventions to promote family and caregiver acceptance and mental health support for sexual minority youth to improve their sleep and other health outcomes.

Journal

LGBT health

Published

2023/03/21

Authors

Nagata JM, Lee CM, Yang JH, Kiss O, Ganson KT, Testa A, Jackson DB, Al-Shoaibi AAA, Baker FC

Keywords

LGBT, sexual and gender minority, sexual orientation, sleep problems, sleep quality

DOI

10.1089/lgbt.2022.0268
Toggle Obesity is associated with decreased gray matter volume in children: a longitudinal study. Cerebral cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991) Jiang F, Li G, Ji W, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Childhood obesity has become a global health problem. Previous studies showed that childhood obesity is associated with brain structural differences relative to controls. However, few studies have been performed with longitudinal evaluations of brain structural developmental trajectories in childhood obesity. We employed voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis to assess gray matter (GM) volume at baseline and 2-year follow-up in 258 obese children (OB) and 265 normal weight children (NW), recruited as part of the National Institutes of Health Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development study. Significant group × time effects on GM volume were observed in the prefrontal lobe, thalamus, right precentral gyrus, caudate, and parahippocampal gyrus/amygdala. OB compared with NW had greater reductions in GM volume in these regions over the 2-year period. Body mass index (BMI) was negatively correlated with GM volume in prefrontal lobe and with matrix reasoning ability at baseline and 2-year follow-up. In OB, Picture Test was positively correlated with GM volume in the left orbital region of the inferior frontal gyrus (OFCinf_L) at baseline and was negatively correlated with reductions in OFCinf_L volume (2-year follow-up vs. baseline). These findings indicate that childhood obesity is associated with GM volume reduction in regions involved with reward evaluation, executive function, and cognitive performance.

Journal

Cerebral cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991)

Published

2023/03/21

Authors

Jiang F, Li G, Ji W, Zhang Y, Wu F, Hu Y, Zhang W, Manza P, Tomasi D, Volkow ND, Gao X, Wang GJ, Zhang Y

Keywords

ABCD, childhood obesity, executive function, gray matter volume, prefrontal lobe

DOI

10.1093/cercor/bhac300
Toggle Ancestral, Pregnancy, and Negative Early-Life Risks Shape Children's Brain (Dis)similarity to Schizophrenia. Biological psychiatry Kochunov P, Ma Y, Hatch KS, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Familial, obstetric, and early-life environmental risks for schizophrenia spectrum disorder (SSD) alter normal cerebral development, leading to the formation of characteristic brain deficit patterns prior to onset of symptoms. We hypothesized that the insidious effects of these risks may increase brain similarity to adult SSD deficit patterns in prepubescent children.

Journal

Biological psychiatry

Published

2023/03/21

Authors

Kochunov P, Ma Y, Hatch KS, Gao S, Acheson A, Jahanshad N, Thompson PM, Adhikari BM, Bruce H, Van der Vaart A, Chiappelli J, Du X, Sotiras A, Kvarta MD, Ma T, Chen S, Hong LE

Keywords

Adolescence, Big data, Brain development, Imaging, Individual prediction, Schizophrenia

DOI

10.1016/j.biopsych.2023.03.009
Toggle Psychopathology as dynamic markers of alcohol initiation across development: A three-year longitudinal examination. Development and psychopathology Watts AL, Doss MI, Bernard DL, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Sipping, an early form of alcohol initiation, is associated with aspects of psychopathology and personality that reflect long-term risk for harmful alcohol use. In the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development cohort ( = 11,872), sipping by age 9-10 was concurrently associated with impulsivity, other aspects of externalizing, and prodromal schizophrenia symptoms. Still, these associations were cross-sectional in nature, leaving open the possibility that these features of psychopathology and personality might not reflect long-term risk for alcohol consumption and related harm across development. Here, we attempted to replicate baseline concurrent associations across three waves of data to extend concurrent associations to prospective ones. Most cross-sectional associations replicated across waves, such that impulsivity, other aspects of externalizing, reward sensitivity (e.g., surgency, sensation seeking), and prodromal schizophrenia symptoms were associated with increased odds of having sipped alcohol by the age of 12. Nevertheless, not all concurrent associations replicated prospectively; impulsigenic features did not reflect long-term risk for sipping. Thus, some psychopathology features appeared to reflect stable risk factors, whereas others appeared to reflect state-dependent risk factors. All told, sipping might not reflect long-term risk for harmful alcohol use, and the nature of sipping may change across development.

Journal

Development and psychopathology

Published

2023/03/20

Authors

Watts AL, Doss MI, Bernard DL, Sher KJ

Keywords

alcohol initiation, alcohol involvement, alcohol sipping, personality, psychopathology

DOI

10.1017/S0954579423000184
Toggle ABCD_Harmonizer: An Open-source Tool for Mapping and Controlling for Scanner Induced Variance in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study. Neuroinformatics Dudley JA, Maloney TC, Simon JO, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Data from multisite magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies contain variance attributable to the scanner that can reduce statistical power and potentially bias results if not appropriately managed. The Adolescent Cognitive Brain Development (ABCD) study is an ongoing, longitudinal neuroimaging study acquiring data from over 11,000 children starting at 9-10 years of age. These scans are acquired on 29 different scanners of 5 different model types manufactured by 3 different vendors. Publicly available data from the ABCD study include structural MRI (sMRI) measures such as cortical thickness and diffusion MRI (dMRI) measures such as fractional anisotropy. In this work, we 1) quantify the variance attributable to scanner effects in the sMRI and dMRI datasets, 2) demonstrate the effectiveness of the data harmonization approach called ComBat to address scanner effects, and 3) present a simple, open-source tool for investigators to harmonize image features from the ABCD study. Scanner-induced variance was present in every image feature and varied in magnitude by feature type and brain location. For almost all features, scanner variance exceeded variability attributable to age and sex. ComBat harmonization was shown to effectively remove scanner induced variance from all image features while preserving the biological variability in the data. Moreover, we show that for studies examining relatively small subsamples of the ABCD dataset, the use of ComBat harmonized data provides more accurate estimates of effect sizes compared to controlling for scanner effects using ordinary least squares regression.

Journal

Neuroinformatics

Published

2023/03/20

Authors

Dudley JA, Maloney TC, Simon JO, Atluri G, Karalunas SL, Altaye M, Epstein JN, Tamm L

Keywords

ABCD study, Harmonization, Image features66666, Multisite

DOI

10.1007/s12021-023-09624-8
Toggle Comparison between gradients and parcellations for functional connectivity prediction of behavior. NeuroImage Kong R, Tan YR, Wulan N, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) is widely used to predict behavioral measures. To predict behavioral measures, representing RSFC with parcellations and gradients are the two most popular approaches. Here, we compare parcellation and gradient approaches for RSFC-based prediction of a broad range of behavioral measures in the Human Connectome Project (HCP) and Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) datasets. Among the parcellation approaches, we consider group-average “hard” parcellations (Schaefer et al., 2018), individual-specific “hard” parcellations (Kong et al., 2021a), and an individual-specific “soft” parcellation (spatial independent component analysis with dual regression; Beckmann et al., 2009). For gradient approaches, we consider the well-known principal gradients (Margulies et al., 2016) and the local gradient approach that detects local RSFC changes (Laumann et al., 2015). Across two regression algorithms, individual-specific hard-parcellation performs the best in the HCP dataset, while the principal gradients, spatial independent component analysis and group-average “hard” parcellations exhibit similar performance. On the other hand, principal gradients and all parcellation approaches perform similarly in the ABCD dataset. Across both datasets, local gradients perform the worst. Finally, we find that the principal gradient approach requires at least 40 to 60 gradients to perform as well as parcellation approaches. While most principal gradient studies utilize a single gradient, our results suggest that incorporating higher order gradients can provide significant behaviorally relevant information. Future work will consider the inclusion of additional parcellation and gradient approaches for comparison.

Journal

NeuroImage

Published

2023/03/20

Authors

Kong R, Tan YR, Wulan N, Ooi LQR, Farahibozorg SR, Harrison S, Bijsterbosch JD, Bernhardt BC, Eickhoff S, Thomas Yeo BT

Keywords

DOI

10.1016/j.neuroimage.2023.120044
Toggle Brain structural co-development is associated with internalizing symptoms two years later in the ABCD cohort. Journal of behavioral addictions Zhao Y, Paulus MP, Potenza MN 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

About 1/3 of youth spend more than four hours/day engaged in screen media activity (SMA). This investigation utilized longitudinal brain imaging and mediation analyses to examine relationships among SMA, brain patterns, and internalizing problems.

Journal

Journal of behavioral addictions

Published

2023/03/20

Authors

Zhao Y, Paulus MP, Potenza MN

Keywords

addiction circuit, addictive behaviors, brain co-development pattern, internalizing behavior, screen media activity, substance use problems

DOI

10.1556/2006.2023.00006
Toggle Pathways link environmental and genetic factors with structural brain networks and psychopathology in youth. Neuropsychopharmacology : official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology Qiu A, Liu C 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Adolescence is a period of significant brain development and maturation, and it is a time when many mental health problems first emerge. This study aimed to explore a comprehensive map that describes possible pathways from genetic and environmental risks to structural brain organization and psychopathology in adolescents. We included 32 environmental items on developmental adversity, maternal substance use, parental psychopathology, socioeconomic status (SES), school and family environment; 10 child psychopathological scales; polygenic risk scores (PRS) for 10 psychiatric disorders, total problems, and cognitive ability; and structural brain networks in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study (ABCD, n = 9168). Structural equation modeling found two pathways linking SES, brain, and psychopathology. Lower SES was found to be associated with lower structural connectivity in the posterior default mode network and greater salience structural connectivity, and with more severe psychosis and internalizing in youth (p < 0.001). Prematurity and birth weight were associated with early-developed sensorimotor and subcortical networks (p < 0.001). Increased parental psychopathology, decreased SES and school engagement was related to elevated family conflict, psychosis, and externalizing behaviors in youth (p < 0.001). Increased maternal substance use predicted increased developmental adversity, internalizing, and psychosis (p < 0.001). But, polygenic risks for psychiatric disorders had moderate effects on brain structural connectivity and psychopathology in youth. These findings suggest that a range of genetic and environmental factors can influence brain structural organization and psychopathology during adolescence, and that addressing these risk factors may be important for promoting positive mental health outcomes in young people.

Journal

Neuropsychopharmacology : official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology

Published

2023/03/17

Authors

Qiu A, Liu C

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41386-023-01559-7
Toggle Joint polygenic and environmental risks for childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and ADHD symptom dimensions. JCPP advances Mooney MA, Ryabinin P, Morton H, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with both polygenic liability and environmental exposures, both intrinsic to the family, such as family conflict, and extrinsic, such as air pollution. However, much less is known about the interplay between environmental and genetic risks relevant to ADHD-a better understanding of which could inform both mechanistic models and clinical prediction algorithms.

Journal

JCPP advances

Published

2023/03/16

Authors

Mooney MA, Ryabinin P, Morton H, Selah K, Gonoud R, Kozlowski M, Nousen E, Tipsord J, Antovich D, Schwartz J, Herting MM, Faraone SV, Nigg JT

Keywords

ADHD, environment, gene‐environment interplay, geocoding, polygenic scores

DOI

10.1002/jcv2.12152
Toggle Adolescent neurodevelopment and psychopathology: The interplay between adversity exposure and genetic risk for accelerated brain ageing. Developmental cognitive neuroscience Petrican R, Fornito A 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

In adulthood, stress exposure and genetic risk heighten psychological vulnerability by accelerating neurobiological senescence. To investigate whether molecular and brain network maturation processes play a similar role in adolescence, we analysed genetic, as well as longitudinal task neuroimaging (inhibitory control, incentive processing) and early life adversity (i.e., material deprivation, violence) data from the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development study (N = 980, age range: 9-13 years). Genetic risk was estimated separately for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), two pathologies linked to stress exposure and allegedly sharing a causal connection (MDD-to-AD). Adversity and genetic risk for MDD/AD jointly predicted functional network segregation patterns suggestive of accelerated (GABA-linked) visual/attentional, but delayed (dopamine [D2]/glutamate [GLU5R]-linked) somatomotor/association system development. A positive relationship between brain maturation and psychopathology emerged only among the less vulnerable adolescents, thereby implying that normatively maladaptive neurodevelopmental alterations could foster adjustment among the more exposed and genetically more stress susceptible youths. Transcriptomic analyses suggested that sensitivity to stress may underpin the joint neurodevelopmental effect of adversity and genetic risk for MDD/AD, in line with the proposed role of negative emotionality as a precursor to AD, likely to account for the alleged causal impact of MDD on dementia onset.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2023/03/15

Authors

Petrican R, Fornito A

Keywords

Adolescent Development, Alzheimer’s Disease, Major Depressive Disorder, Psychopathology, Stress Susceptibility, Transcriptomics

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2023.101229
Toggle Polyneuro risk scores capture widely distributed connectivity patterns of cognition. Developmental cognitive neuroscience Byington N, Grimsrud G, Mooney MA, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) is a powerful tool for characterizing brain changes, but it has yet to reliably predict higher-order cognition. This may be attributed to small effect sizes of such brain-behavior relationships, which can lead to underpowered, variable results when utilizing typical sample sizes (N∼25). Inspired by techniques in genomics, we implement the polyneuro risk score (PNRS) framework – the application of multivariate techniques to RSFC data and validation in an independent sample. Utilizing the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development® cohort split into two datasets, we explore the framework’s ability to reliably capture brain-behavior relationships across 3 cognitive scores – general ability, executive function, learning & memory. The weight and significance of each connection is assessed in the first dataset, and a PNRS is calculated for each participant in the second. Results support the PNRS framework as a suitable methodology to inspect the distribution of connections contributing towards behavior, with explained variance ranging from 1.0 % to 21.4 %. For the outcomes assessed, the framework reveals globally distributed, rather than localized, patterns of predictive connections. Larger samples are likely necessary to systematically identify the specific connections contributing towards complex outcomes. The PNRS framework could be applied translationally to identify neurologically distinct subtypes of neurodevelopmental disorders.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2023/03/15

Authors

Byington N, Grimsrud G, Mooney MA, Cordova M, Doyle O, Hermosillo RJM, Earl E, Houghton A, Conan G, Hendrickson TJ, Ragothaman A, Carrasco CM, Rueter A, Perrone A, Moore LA, Graham A, Nigg JT, Thompson WK, Nelson SM, Feczko E, Fair DA, Miranda-Dominguez O

Keywords

BWAS, Big data, MRI, Neuroimaging, PNRS, Reproducibility

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2023.101231
Toggle Evidence for embracing normative modeling. eLife Rutherford S, Barkema P, Tso IF, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

In this work, we expand the normative model repository introduced in Rutherford et al., 2022a to include normative models charting lifespan trajectories of structural surface area and brain functional connectivity, measured using two unique resting-state network atlases (Yeo-17 and Smith-10), and an updated online platform for transferring these models to new data sources. We showcase the value of these models with a head-to-head comparison between the features output by normative modeling and raw data features in several benchmarking tasks: mass univariate group difference testing (schizophrenia versus control), classification (schizophrenia versus control), and regression (predicting general cognitive ability). Across all benchmarks, we show the advantage of using normative modeling features, with the strongest statistically significant results demonstrated in the group difference testing and classification tasks. We intend for these accessible resources to facilitate the wider adoption of normative modeling across the neuroimaging community.

Journal

eLife

Published

2023/03/13

Authors

Rutherford S, Barkema P, Tso IF, Sripada C, Beckmann CF, Ruhe HG, Marquand AF

Keywords

brain charts, computational psychiatry, functional neuroimaging, heterogeneity, human, individual prediction, machine learning, neuroscience

DOI

10.7554/eLife.85082
Toggle Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Mental Healthcare in Youth With Incarcerated Parents. American journal of preventive medicine Ryan JE, McCabe SE, DiDonato S, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Youth with incarcerated parents experience more adverse childhood experiences than other youth, placing them at higher risk for mental health and substance use disorders. Despite their increased risk, these youth may be less likely to access mental health services, particularly given their racial and ethnic makeup. Therefore, this study aimed to assess racial and ethnic disparities in access to mental health services for youth with incarcerated parents.

Journal

American journal of preventive medicine

Published

2023/03/12

Authors

Ryan JE, McCabe SE, DiDonato S, Boyd CJ, Voepel-Lewis T, Ploutz-Snyder RJ, Veliz PT

Keywords

DOI

10.1016/j.amepre.2023.03.008
Toggle The genetic architecture of human amygdala volumes and their overlap with common brain disorders. Translational psychiatry Ou YN, Wu BS, Ge YJ, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

The amygdala is a crucial interconnecting structure in the brain that performs several regulatory functions, yet its genetic architectures and involvement in brain disorders remain largely unknown. We carried out the first multivariate genome-wide association study (GWAS) of amygdala subfield volumes in 27,866 UK Biobank individuals. The whole amygdala was segmented into nine nuclei groups using Bayesian amygdala segmentation. The post-GWAS analysis allowed us to identify causal genetic variants in phenotypes at the SNP, locus, and gene levels, as well as genetic overlap with brain health-related traits. We further generalized our GWAS in Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) cohort. The multivariate GWAS identified 98 independent significant variants within 32 genomic loci associated (P < 5 × 10) with amygdala volume and its nine nuclei. The univariate GWAS identified significant hits for eight of the ten volumes, tagging 14 independent genomic loci. Overall, 13 of the 14 loci identified in the univariate GWAS were replicated in the multivariate GWAS. The generalization in ABCD cohort supported the GWAS results with the 12q23.2 (RNA gene RP11-210L7.1) being discovered. All of these imaging phenotypes are heritable, with heritability ranging from 15% to 27%. Gene-based analyses revealed pathways relating to cell differentiation/development and ion transporter/homeostasis, with the astrocytes found to be significantly enriched. Pleiotropy analyses revealed shared variants with neurological and psychiatric disorders under the conjFDR threshold of 0.05. These findings advance our understanding of the complex genetic architectures of amygdala and their relevance in neurological and psychiatric disorders.

Journal

Translational psychiatry

Published

2023/03/11

Authors

Ou YN, Wu BS, Ge YJ, Zhang Y, Jiang YC, Kuo K, Yang L, Tan L, Feng JF, Cheng W, Yu JT

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41398-023-02387-5
Toggle Explainable machine learning approach to predict and explain the relationship between task-based fMRI and individual differences in cognition. Cerebral cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991) Pat N, Wang Y, Bartonicek A, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Despite decades of costly research, we still cannot accurately predict individual differences in cognition from task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Moreover, aiming for methods with higher prediction is not sufficient. To understand brain-cognition relationships, we need to explain how these methods draw brain information to make the prediction. Here we applied an explainable machine-learning (ML) framework to predict cognition from task-based fMRI during the n-back working-memory task, using data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (n = 3,989). We compared 9 predictive algorithms in their ability to predict 12 cognitive abilities. We found better out-of-sample prediction from ML algorithms over the mass-univariate and ordinary least squares (OLS) multiple regression. Among ML algorithms, Elastic Net, a linear and additive algorithm, performed either similar to or better than nonlinear and interactive algorithms. We explained how these algorithms drew information, using SHapley Additive explanation, eNetXplorer, Accumulated Local Effects, and Friedman’s H-statistic. These explainers demonstrated benefits of ML over the OLS multiple regression. For example, ML provided some consistency in variable importance with a previous study and consistency with the mass-univariate approach in the directionality of brain-cognition relationships at different regions. Accordingly, our explainable-ML framework predicted cognition from task-based fMRI with boosted prediction and explainability over standard methodologies.

Journal

Cerebral cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991)

Published

2023/03/10

Authors

Pat N, Wang Y, Bartonicek A, Candia J, Stringaris A

Keywords

Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development, explainers, predictive modeling, task-based fMRI, working memory

DOI

10.1093/cercor/bhac235
Toggle Psychiatric Diagnoses and Treatment in Nine- to Ten-Year-Old Participants in the ABCD Study. JAACAP open Duffy KA, Gandhi R, Falke C, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Psychiatric disorders commonly emerge prior to adulthood. Identification and intervention may vary significantly across populations. We leveraged a large population-based study to estimate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and treatments, and evaluate predictors of treatment, in children ages 9-10 in the United States.

Journal

JAACAP open

Published

2023/03/09

Authors

Duffy KA, Gandhi R, Falke C, Wiglesworth A, Mueller BA, Fiecas MB, Klimes-Dougan B, Luciana M, Cullen KR

Keywords

ABCD study, Mental health, medication, psychiatric disorders, treatment

DOI

10.1016/j.jaacop.2023.03.001
Toggle Developmental brain changes during puberty and associations with mental health problems. Developmental cognitive neuroscience Dehestani N, Whittle S, Vijayakumar N, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Our understanding of the mechanisms relating pubertal timing to mental health problems via brain development remains rudimentary.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2023/03/09

Authors

Dehestani N, Whittle S, Vijayakumar N, Silk TJ

Keywords

Brain age, Brain development, Mental health problems, Pubertal timing, Puberty

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2023.101227
Toggle Gender diversity associated with patterns of brain activation seen in populations that experience childhood stress. Frontiers in integrative neuroscience Loso H, Chaarani B, Dube SL, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Stressful childhood experiences are associated with unique brain activity patterns during emotional processing. Specifically, pediatric stress is linked to activation in the insulae, superior temporal and parahippocampal gyri, and the amygdalae, as well as differential activation in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex when viewing emotional faces. Gender diversity is broadly associated with higher victimization and mental health disparities in children aged 9/10, but whether it is associated with stress-like alterations in brain function (BOLD signal during task-based fMRI) remains unknown. We investigate the functional brain correlates of this relationship to determine if gender-diverse youth show patterns of functional activity during an emotional task consistent with those of other populations that experience heightened stress.

Journal

Frontiers in integrative neuroscience

Published

2023/03/09

Authors

Loso H, Chaarani B, Dube SL, Albaugh MD, Cheaito A, Garavan H, Potter A

Keywords

ABCD, BOLD (blood oxygenation level dependent) signal, fMRI, gender diversity, stress

DOI

10.3389/fnint.2023.1084748
Toggle Multivariate BWAS can be replicable with moderate sample sizes. Nature Spisak T, Bingel U, Wager TD 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Journal

Nature

Published

2023/03/08

Authors

Spisak T, Bingel U, Wager TD

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41586-023-05745-x
Toggle Multi-ancestry phenome-wide association of complement component 4 variation with psychiatric and brain phenotypes in youth. Genome biology Hernandez LM, Kim M, Zhang P, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Increased expression of the complement component 4A (C4A) gene is associated with a greater lifetime risk of schizophrenia. In the brain, C4A is involved in synaptic pruning; yet, it remains unclear the extent to which upregulation of C4A alters brain development or is associated with the risk for psychotic symptoms in childhood. Here, we perform a multi-ancestry phenome-wide association study in 7789 children aged 9-12 years to examine the relationship between genetically regulated expression (GREx) of C4A, childhood brain structure, cognition, and psychiatric symptoms.

Journal

Genome biology

Published

2023/03/07

Authors

Hernandez LM, Kim M, Zhang P, Bethlehem RAI, Hoftman G, Loughnan R, Smith D, Bookheimer SY, Fan CC, Bearden CE, Thompson WK, Gandal MJ

Keywords

Brain, Complement, Gene expression, Genetics, Neuroimaging, Psychosis, Schizophrenia

DOI

10.1186/s13059-023-02878-0
Toggle Problematic social media use and alcohol expectancies in early adolescents. BMC public health Nagata JM, Smith N, Zamora G, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Alcohol expectancies are beliefs regarding positive (e.g., tension reduction) or negative (e.g., loss of motor coordination) effects of alcohol. Based on Social Learning Theory, social media can influence alcohol expectancies in adolescents. In particular, problematic social media use – which can reflect elements of addiction, including mood modification, tolerance, withdrawal, conflict, and relapse – could be linked to alcohol expectancies. We aimed to determine the associations between problematic social media use and alcohol expectancies in a national (U.S.) cohort of 10-14-year-old early adolescents.

Journal

BMC public health

Published

2023/03/06

Authors

Nagata JM, Smith N, Zamora G, Sajjad OM, Ganson KT, Testa A, Jackson DB

Keywords

Adolescents, Alcohol expectancies, Problematic media use, Social media

DOI

10.1186/s12889-023-15298-3
Toggle Gut-Brain Axis Perspective on Negative Symptoms and Their Neighbors in Early Adolescence: Can We Move Care Upstream? Journal of psychosocial nursing and mental health services Ford SH, Bruckner L, Thoyre S, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

The current study investigated symptom network patterns in adolescents from a gut-brain-axis (GBA) biopsychosocial perspective. Our secondary analysis of data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study assessed symptom relationships using network analysis to provide information about multivariate structural dependencies among 41 signs and symptoms. Cross-sectional EBICglasso symptom networks were evaluated to assess patterns associated with anhedonia and depressed mood. Significant differences were identified between symptom neighbors of anhedonia compared with depressed mood based on stratification by age. The GBA perspective revealed several symptom neighbors that could expand clinical assessment, diagnosing criteria, education, and interventions for adolescents at risk for, or with, anhedonia or depressed mood. Results speak to the unique impact of symptoms on health that are not interchangeable with other symptoms and do not have equal effects. Mental health nurses should consider a holistic and proactive precision health approach to improving health and well-being through evidence-based assessment of symptom associations. [(7), 29-38.].

Journal

Journal of psychosocial nursing and mental health services

Published

2023/03/05

Authors

Ford SH, Bruckner L, Thoyre S, Baker MJ, Bartlett TR, Hodges EA

Keywords

DOI

10.3928/02793695-20230221-03
Toggle Getting a Good Night's Sleep: Associations Between Sleep Duration and Parent-Reported Sleep Quality on Default Mode Network Connectivity in Youth. The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine Hehr A, Huntley ED, Marusak HA 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Sleep plays an important role in healthy neurocognitive development, and poor sleep is linked to cognitive and emotional dysfunction. Studies in adults suggest that shorter sleep duration and poor sleep quality may disrupt core neurocognitive networks, particularly the default mode network (DMN)-a network implicated in internal cognitive processing and rumination. Here, we examine the relationships between sleep and within- and between-network resting-state functional connectivity (rs-FC) of the DMN in youth.

Journal

The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine

Published

2023/03/03

Authors

Hehr A, Huntley ED, Marusak HA

Keywords

Default mode network, Dorsal attention network, Frontoparietal network, Resting-state functional connectivity, Salience network, Sleep disturbances

DOI

10.1016/j.jadohealth.2023.01.010
Toggle Reply to: Multivariate BWAS can be replicable with moderate sample sizes. Nature Tervo-Clemmens B, Marek S, Chauvin RJ, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Journal

Nature

Published

2023/03/01

Authors

Tervo-Clemmens B, Marek S, Chauvin RJ, Van AN, Kay BP, Laumann TO, Thompson WK, Nichols TE, Yeo BTT, Barch DM, Luna B, Fair DA, Dosenbach NUF

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41586-023-05746-w
Toggle COVID-19 Policies, Pandemic Disruptions, and Changes in Child Mental Health and Sleep in the United States. JAMA network open Xiao Y, Brown TT, Snowden LR, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

The adverse effects of COVID-19 containment policies disrupting child mental health and sleep have been debated. However, few current estimates correct biases of these potential effects.

Journal

JAMA network open

Published

2023/03/01

Authors

Xiao Y, Brown TT, Snowden LR, Chow JC, Mann JJ

Keywords

DOI

10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2023.2716
Toggle Machine Learning-Based Prediction of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Sleep Problems With Wearable Data in Children. JAMA network open Kim WP, Kim HJ, Pack SP, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Early detection of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and sleep problems is paramount for children’s mental health. Interview-based diagnostic approaches have drawbacks, necessitating the development of an evaluation method that uses digital phenotypes in daily life.

Journal

JAMA network open

Published

2023/03/01

Authors

Kim WP, Kim HJ, Pack SP, Lim JH, Cho CH, Lee HJ

Keywords

DOI

10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2023.3502
Toggle Association of Demographic and Socioeconomic Indicators With the Use of Wearable Devices Among Children. JAMA network open Kim EH, Jenness JL, Miller AB, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

The use of consumer-grade wearable devices for collecting data for biomedical research may be associated with social determinants of health (SDoHs) linked to people’s understanding of and willingness to join and remain engaged in remote health studies.

Journal

JAMA network open

Published

2023/03/01

Authors

Kim EH, Jenness JL, Miller AB, Halabi R, de Zambotti M, Bagot KS, Baker FC, Pratap A

Keywords

DOI

10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2023.5681
Toggle Social problems and brain structure development following childhood mild traumatic brain injury. Cortex; a journal devoted to the study of the nervous system and behavior Dégeilh F, von Soest T, Ferschmann L, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Childhood mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is associated with elevated risk of developing social problems, which may be underpinned by changes in the structural developmental trajectory of the social brain, a network of cortical regions supporting social cognition and behavior. However, limited sample sizes and cross-sectional designs generally used in neuroimaging studies of pediatric TBI have prevented explorations of this hypothesis. This longitudinal retrospective study examined the development of parent-reported social problems and cortical thickness in social brain regions following childhood mTBI using data from the large population-based Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study. Two-group latent change score models revealed different developmental trajectories from ages 10-12 years in the level of social problems between children with (n = 345) and without (n = 7,089) mTBI. Children with mTBI showed higher, but non-clinical, levels of social problems than controls at age 10. Then, social problems decreased over 2 years, but still remained higher, but non-clinical, than in controls in which they stayed stable. Both groups showed similar decreases in social brain cortical thickness between ages 10 and 12 years. Further studies providing detailed information on the injury mechanism and acute symptoms are needed to better understand individual differences in social functioning and brain development in pediatric TBI.

Journal

Cortex; a journal devoted to the study of the nervous system and behavior

Published

2023/02/27

Authors

Dégeilh F, von Soest T, Ferschmann L, Beer JC, Gaubert M, Koerte IK, Tamnes CK

Keywords

Brain development, Concussion, Cortical thickness, Social problems, Traumatic brain injury

DOI

10.1016/j.cortex.2023.02.003