ABCD Study publications are authored by ABCD investigators, collaborators, and non-ABCD researchers. The analysis methodologies, findings, and interpretations expressed in these publications are those of the authors and do not constitute an endorsement by the ABCD Study®.

Please note that the publications listed here include empirical as well as non-empirical papers (e.g., focused review articles, editorials).

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Toggle The beneficial effect of sleep on behavioral health problems in youth is disrupted by prenatal cannabis exposure: A causal random forest analysis of Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development data. Child development Spechler PA, Gutierrez RM, Tapert SF, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Studies suggest prenatal cannabis exposure is associated with mood/behavioral problems in children. However, it is unclear if targeting modifiable domains like sleep behaviors would improve outcomes in exposed youth. Using a causal inference framework, the effect of changing sleep-hours on changing internalizing/externalizing problems in children was examined using the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development™ study baseline (ages 9-10; collected during 2016-2018) and year-1 follow-up data (N = 9825; 4663 female; 5196 white). Average treatment effects (ATE) indicated that more sleep predicted less internalizing (ATE = -.34, SE = .08, p < .001) and externalizing (ATE = -.29, SE = .07, p < .001) problems over time. However, prenatal cannabis exposure moderated the ATE on internalizing (conditional-ATE = .91, SE = .39, p = .019), whereby participants with exposure (n = 605) did not show any effect of changing sleep-hours on mood (B = .09, SE = .24).

Journal

Child development

Published

2023/02/24

Authors

Spechler PA, Gutierrez RM, Tapert SF, Thompson WK, Paulus MP

Keywords

DOI

10.1111/cdev.13899
Toggle The role of brain structure in the association between pubertal timing and depression risk in an early adolescent sample (the ABCD Study®): A registered report. Developmental cognitive neuroscience MacSweeney N, Allardyce J, Edmondson-Stait A, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Earlier pubertal timing is associated with higher rates of depressive disorders in adolescence. Neuroimaging studies report brain structural associations with both pubertal timing and depression. However, whether brain structure mediates the relationship between pubertal timing and depression remains unclear.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2023/02/24

Authors

MacSweeney N, Allardyce J, Edmondson-Stait A, Shen X, Casey H, Chan SWY, Cullen B, Reynolds RM, Frangou S, Kwong ASF, Lawrie SM, Romaniuk L, Whalley HC

Keywords

ABCD Study, Adolescent depression, Brain structure, Pubertal timing

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2023.101223
Toggle Erratum to: Morphology of the prefrontal cortex predicts body composition in early adolescence: cognitive mediators and environmental moderators in the ABCD Study. Social cognitive and affective neuroscience Hall PA, Best JR, Beaton EA, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Journal

Social cognitive and affective neuroscience

Published

2023/02/23

Authors

Hall PA, Best JR, Beaton EA, Sakib MN, Danckert J

Keywords

DOI

10.1093/scan/nsac002
Toggle Linking brain maturation and puberty during early adolescence using longitudinal brain age prediction in the ABCD cohort. Developmental cognitive neuroscience Holm MC, Leonardsen EH, Beck D, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

The temporal characteristics of adolescent neurodevelopment are shaped by a complex interplay of genetic, biological, and environmental factors. Using a large longitudinal dataset of children aged 9-13 from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study we tested the associations between pubertal status and brain maturation. Brain maturation was assessed using brain age prediction based on convolutional neural networks and minimally processed T1-weighted structural MRI data. Brain age prediction provided highly accurate and reliable estimates of individual age, with an overall mean absolute error of 0.7 and 1.4 years at the two timepoints respectively, and an intraclass correlation of 0.65. Linear mixed effects (LME) models accounting for age and sex showed that on average, a one unit increase in pubertal maturational level was associated with a 2.22 months higher brain age across time points (β = 0.10, p < .001). Moreover, annualized change in pubertal development was weakly related to the rate of change in brain age (β = .047, p = 0.04). These results demonstrate a link between sexual development and brain maturation in early adolescence, and provides a basis for further investigations of the complex sociobiological impacts of puberty on life outcomes.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2023/02/22

Authors

Holm MC, Leonardsen EH, Beck D, Dahl A, Kjelkenes R, de Lange AG, Westlye LT

Keywords

Adolescence, Brain age, Puberty, Sex-difference

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2023.101220
Toggle Genetic risk for obesity impacts the brain and behavior in youth Nature Mental Health Bakoyiannis J 2023
Link to Publication

Abstract

Obesity pandemic is reaching an alarming level globally, including in childhood, with a strong tendency to carry it over in adulthood. Obesity induces deleterious neurobiological outcomes; however, Morys et al. investigated how genetic predisposition to obesity — not obesity itself — impacts the brain and behavior. “We focused on children, as the effects of chronic obesity on the brain are possibly low, so any brain changes associated with genetic risk for obesity would likely constitute vulnerability factors rather than secondary effects of obesity,” explains Filip Morys, the first author of the study.

Journal

Nature Mental Health

Published

2023/02/17

Authors

Bakoyiannis J

Keywords

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/s44220-023-00020-4
Toggle Acculturative Orientations Among Hispanic/Latinx Caregivers in the ABCD Study: Associations With Caregiver and Youth Mental Health and Youth Brain Function. Biological psychiatry global open science Meca A, Peraza JA, Riedel MC, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Population-based neuroscience offers opportunities to examine important but understudied sociocultural factors such as acculturation. Acculturation refers to the extent to which an individual retains their cultural heritage and/or adopts the receiving society’s culture and is particularly salient among Hispanic/Latinx immigrants. Specific acculturative orientations have been linked to vulnerability to substance use, depression, and suicide and are known to influence family dynamics between caregivers and their children.

Journal

Biological psychiatry global open science

Published

2023/02/17

Authors

Meca A, Peraza JA, Riedel MC, Hale W, Pettit JW, Musser ED, Salo T, Flannery JS, Bottenhorn KL, Dick AS, Pintos Lobo R, Ucros LM, Greaves CA, Hawes SW, Sanchez M, Gonzalez MR, Sutherland MT, Gonzalez R, Laird AR

Keywords

ABCD study, Acculturation, Bicultural, Family systems, Hispanic/Latinx, Resting-state fMRI

DOI

10.1016/j.bpsgos.2023.02.005
Toggle Screen time and suicidal behaviors among U.S. children 9-11 years old: A prospective cohort study. Preventive medicine Chu J, Ganson KT, Baker FC, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Suicide is a leading cause of death among adolescents. Emerging literature has described relationships between excessive screen time and suicidal behaviors, though findings have been mixed. The objective of this study is to determine the prospective associations between screen time and suicidal behaviors two-years later in a national (U.S.) cohort of 9-11-year-old-children. We analyzed prospective cohort data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study (N = 11,633). Logistic regression analyses were estimated to determine the associations between baseline self-reported screen time (exposure) and suicidal behaviors (outcome) based on the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (KSADS-5) at two-year-follow-up. Participants reported an average of 4.0 h of total screen time per day at baseline. At two-year-follow-up, 1.38% of the sample reported at least one suicidal behavior. Each additional hour of total screen time was prospectively associated with 1.09 higher odds of suicidal behaviors at 2-year-follow-up (95% CI 1.03-1.14), after adjusting for covariates. For specific screen time modalities, each additional hour of texting (aOR 1.36, 95% CI 1.06-1.74), video chatting (aOR 1.30, 95% CI 1.03-1.65), watching videos (aOR 1.21, 95% CI 1.04-1.39), and playing video games (aOR 1.18, 95% CI 1.01-1.38) was associated with higher odds of subsequent suicidal behaviors. Higher screen time is associated with higher odds of reporting suicidal behaviors at two-year-follow-up. Future research should seek to identify how specific screen time experiences may influence suicidal behaviors.

Journal

Preventive medicine

Published

2023/02/17

Authors

Chu J, Ganson KT, Baker FC, Testa A, Jackson DB, Murray SB, Nagata JM

Keywords

Adolescent health, Mental health, Screen time, Suicidal behaviors, Suicide, Texting, Video games

DOI

10.1016/j.ypmed.2023.107452
Toggle Adverse childhood experiences and sipping alcohol in U.S. Children: Findings from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study. Preventive medicine reports Nagata JM, Smith N, Sajjad OM, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between accumulating adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and sipping alcohol in a large, nationwide sample of 9-to-10-year-old U.S. children. We analyzed data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study (2016-2018). Of 10,853 children (49.1 % female), 23.4 % reported ever sipping alcohol. A greater ACE score was associated with a higher risk of sipping alcohol. Having 4 or more ACEs placed children at 1.27 times the risk (95 % CI 1.11-1.45) of sipping alcohol compared to children with no ACEs. Among the nine distinct ACEs examined, household violence (Risk Ratio [RR] = 1.13, 95 % CI 1.04-1.22) and household alcohol abuse (RR = 1.14, 95 % CI 1.05-1.22) were associated with sipping alcohol during childhood. Our findings indicate a need for increased clinical attention to alcohol sipping among ACE-exposed children.

Journal

Preventive medicine reports

Published

2023/02/17

Authors

Nagata JM, Smith N, Sajjad OM, Zamora G, Raney JH, Ganson KT, Testa A, Vittinghoff E, Jackson DB

Keywords

ABCD, Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development study, ACEs, Adverse childhood experiences, Adverse childhood experiences, Alcohol, Childhood, Pediatrics, Sipping, Substance use

DOI

10.1016/j.pmedr.2023.102153
Toggle Task fMRI paradigms may capture more behaviorally relevant information than resting-state functional connectivity. NeuroImage Zhao W, Makowski C, Hagler DJ, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Characterizing the optimal fMRI paradigms for detecting behaviorally relevant functional connectivity (FC) patterns is a critical step to furthering our knowledge of the neural basis of behavior. Previous studies suggested that FC patterns derived from task fMRI paradigms, which we refer to as task-based FC, are better correlated with individual differences in behavior than resting-state FC, but the consistency and generalizability of this advantage across task conditions was not fully explored. Using data from resting-state fMRI and three fMRI tasks from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study ® (ABCD), we tested whether the observed improvement in behavioral prediction power of task-based FC can be attributed to changes in brain activity induced by the task design. We decomposed the task fMRI time course of each task into the task model fit (the fitted time course of the task condition regressors from the single-subject general linear model) and the task model residuals, calculated their respective FC, and compared the behavioral prediction performance of these FC estimates to resting-state FC and the original task-based FC. The FC of the task model fit was better than the FC of the task model residual and resting-state FC at predicting a measure of general cognitive ability or two measures of performance on the fMRI tasks. The superior behavioral prediction performance of the FC of the task model fit was content-specific insofar as it was only observed for fMRI tasks that probed similar cognitive constructs to the predicted behavior of interest. To our surprise, the task model parameters, the beta estimates of the task condition regressors, were equally if not more predictive of behavioral differences than all FC measures. These results showed that the observed improvement of behavioral prediction afforded by task-based FC was largely driven by the FC patterns associated with the task design. Together with previous studies, our findings highlighted the importance of task design in eliciting behaviorally meaningful brain activation and FC patterns.

Journal

NeuroImage

Published

2023/02/17

Authors

Zhao W, Makowski C, Hagler DJ, Garavan HP, Thompson WK, Greene DJ, Jernigan TL, Dale AM

Keywords

Behavioral differences, Behavioral inhibition, Cognitive development, Functional connectivity, Predictive modeling

DOI

10.1016/j.neuroimage.2023.119946
Toggle Gene-by-Environment Interaction Effects of Social Adversity on Externalizing Behavior in ABCD Youth. Behavior genetics Dash GF, Karalunas SL, Kenyon EA, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

This study tested whether multiple domains of social adversity, including neighborhood opportunity/deprivation and life stress, moderate genetic (A), common environmental (C), and unique environmental (E) influences on externalizing behaviors in 760 same-sex twin pairs (332 monozygotic; 428 dizygotic) ages 10-11 from the ABCD Study. Proportion of C influences on externalizing behavior increased at higher neighborhood adversity (lower overall opportunity). A decreased and C and E increased at lower levels of educational opportunity. A increased at lower health-environment and social-economic opportunity levels. For life stress, A decreased and E increased with number of experienced events. Results for educational opportunity and stressful life experiences suggest a bioecological gene-environment interaction pattern such that environmental influences predominate at higher levels of adversity, whereas limited access to healthcare, housing, and employment stability may potentiate genetic liability for externalizing behavior via a diathesis-stress mechanism. More detailed operationalization of social adversity in gene-environment interaction studies is needed.

Journal

Behavior genetics

Published

2023/02/16

Authors

Dash GF, Karalunas SL, Kenyon EA, Carter EK, Mooney MA, Nigg JT, Feldstein Ewing SW

Keywords

ABCD, Externalizing, Gene-environment interaction, Life stress, Social adversity, Twin study

DOI

10.1007/s10519-023-10136-z
Toggle Negative impact of daily screen use on inhibitory control network in preadolescence: A two-year follow-up study. Developmental cognitive neuroscience Chen YY, Yim H, Lee TH 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic has made an unprecedented shift in children’s daily lives. Children are increasingly spending time with screens to learn and connect with others. As the online environment rapidly substitutes in-person experience, understanding children’s neuropsychological trajectories associated with screen experiences is important. Previous findings suggest that excessive screen use can lead children to prefer more immediate rewards over delayed outcomes. We hypothesized that increased screen time delays a child’s development of inhibitory control system in the brain (i.e., fronto-striatal circuitry). By analyzing neuropsychological data from 8324 children (9-11ys) from the ABCD Study, we found that children who had more screen time showed a higher reward orientation and weaker fronto-striatal connectivity. Importantly, we found that the daily screen exposure mediated the effect of reward sensitivity on the development of the inhibitory control system in the brain over a two year period. These findings suggest possible negative long-term impacts of increased daily screen time on children’s neuropsychological development. The results further demonstrated that screen time influences dorsal striatum connectivity, which suggests that the effect of daily screen use is a habitual seeking behavior. The study provides neural and behavioral evidence for the negative impact of daily screen use on developing children.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2023/02/16

Authors

Chen YY, Yim H, Lee TH

Keywords

Child development, Fronto-parietal network, Fronto-striatal circuits, Inhibitory control, Screen time, Striatum

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2023.101218
Toggle The subcortical correlates of autistic traits in school-age children: a population-based neuroimaging study. Molecular autism Sharp TH, Elsabbagh M, Pickles A, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

There is emerging evidence that the neuroanatomy of autism forms a spectrum which extends into the general population. However, whilst several studies have identified cortical morphology correlates of autistic traits, it is not established whether morphological differences are present in the subcortical structures of the brain. Additionally, it is not clear to what extent previously reported structural associations may be confounded by co-occurring psychopathology. To address these questions, we utilised neuroimaging data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study to assess whether a measure of autistic traits was associated with differences in child subcortical morphology, and if any observed differences persisted after adjustment for child internalising and externalising symptoms.

Journal

Molecular autism

Published

2023/02/11

Authors

Sharp TH, Elsabbagh M, Pickles A, Bedford R

Keywords

ABCD, Autism, Autistic traits, Brain morphology, MRI, Neuroimaging, Subcortex

DOI

10.1186/s13229-023-00538-5
Toggle Youth Team Sports Participation Associates With Reduced Dimensional Psychopathology Through Interaction With Biological Risk Factors. Biological psychiatry global open science Kunitoki K, Hughes D, Elyounssi S, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Physical activity is associated with mental health benefits in youth. Here, we used causal inference and triangulation with 2 levels of biology to substantiate relationships between sports participation and dimensional psychopathology in youths.

Journal

Biological psychiatry global open science

Published

2023/02/10

Authors

Kunitoki K, Hughes D, Elyounssi S, Hopkinson CE, Bazer OM, Eryilmaz H, Dunn EC, Lee PH, Doyle AE, Roffman JL

Keywords

Dimensional psychopathology, Gene-environment interaction, Physical activity, Polygenic risk scores, Subcortical volume

DOI

10.1016/j.bpsgos.2023.02.001
Toggle Heritability of Childhood Music Engagement and Associations with Language and Executive Function: Insights from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study. Behavior genetics Gustavson DE, Nayak S, Coleman PL, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Music engagement is a powerful, influential experience that often begins early in life. Music engagement is moderately heritable in adults (~ 41-69%), but fewer studies have examined genetic influences on childhood music engagement, including their association with language and executive functions. Here we explored genetic and environmental influences on music listening and instrument playing (including singing) in the baseline assessment of the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study. Parents reported on their 9-10-year-old children’s music experiences (N = 11,876 children; N = 1543 from twin pairs). Both music measures were explained primarily by shared environmental influences. Instrument exposure (but not frequency of instrument engagement) was associated with language skills (r = .27) and executive functions (r = .15-0.17), and these associations with instrument engagement were stronger than those for music listening, visual art, or soccer engagement. These findings highlight the role of shared environmental influences between early music experiences, language, and executive function, during a formative time in development.

Journal

Behavior genetics

Published

2023/02/09

Authors

Gustavson DE, Nayak S, Coleman PL, Iversen JR, Lense MD, Gordon RL, Maes HH

Keywords

Executive control, Heritability, Language skill, Musicality, Twin study

DOI

10.1007/s10519-023-10135-0
Toggle Brain Structure Relations With Psychopathology Trajectories in the ABCD Study. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Romer AL, Ren B, Pizzagalli DA 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

A general psychopathology (p) factor captures shared variation across mental disorders. Structural neural alterations have been associated with the p factor concurrently, but less is known about whether these alterations relate to within-person change in the p factor over time, especially during preadolescence, a period of neurodevelopmental changes.

Journal

Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

Published

2023/02/09

Authors

Romer AL, Ren B, Pizzagalli DA

Keywords

brain structure, general psychopathology, longitudinal, p factor, transdiagnostic

DOI

10.1016/j.jaac.2023.02.002
Toggle Multiple measurement analysis of resting-state fMRI for ADHD classification in adolescent brain from the ABCD study. Translational psychiatry Wang Z, Zhou X, Gui Y, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common psychiatric disorders in school-aged children. Its accurate diagnosis looks after patients’ interests well with effective treatment, which is important to them and their family. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) has been widely used to characterize the abnormal brain function by computing the voxel-wise measures and Pearson’s correlation (PC)-based functional connectivity (FC) for ADHD diagnosis. However, exploring the powerful measures of rsfMRI to improve ADHD diagnosis remains a particular challenge. To this end, this paper proposes an automated ADHD classification framework by fusion of multiple measures of rsfMRI in adolescent brain. First, we extract the voxel-wise measures and ROI-wise time series from the brain regions of rsfMRI after preprocessing. Then, to extract the multiple functional connectivities, we compute the PC-derived FCs including the topographical information-based high-order FC (tHOFC) and dynamics-based high-order FC (dHOFC), the sparse representation (SR)-derived FCs including the group SR (GSR), the strength and similarity guided GSR (SSGSR), and sparse low-rank (SLR). Finally, these measures are combined with multiple kernel learning (MKL) model for ADHD classification. The proposed method is applied to the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development (ABCD) dataset. The results show that the FCs of dHOFC and SLR perform better than the others. Fusing multiple measures achieves the best classification performance (AUC = 0.740, accuracy = 0.6916), superior to those from the single measure and the previous studies. We have identified the most discriminative FCs and brain regions for ADHD diagnosis, which are consistent with those of published literature.

Journal

Translational psychiatry

Published

2023/02/06

Authors

Wang Z, Zhou X, Gui Y, Liu M, Lu H

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41398-023-02309-5
Toggle Effects of prenatal cannabis exposure on developmental trajectory of cognitive ability and brain volumes in the adolescent brain cognitive development (ABCD) study. Developmental cognitive neuroscience Hiraoka D, Makita K, Hamatani S, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Although cannabis use during pregnancy is increasing widely, the effects of cannabis on developmental trajectories, such as whether its effects during pregnancy remain the same between time points or gradually increase, are unclear. This study aimed to examine whether cannabis use during pregnancy affects the process of change in cognition and brain volume. Data from two-time points measured longitudinally were analyzed. We used data from the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development Study. Participants included 11,876 children aged 9-11 years participated at baseline, and 10,414 participated at 2-year follow-up from 22 sites across the United States. We explored the associations between prenatal cannabis exposure and cognitive abilities and brain volumes developmental trajectories. Among 11,530 children with valid data for prenatal cannabis exposure, 10,833 had no prenatal cannabis use, and 697 had cannabis use during their pregnancy. There was a significant interaction between time points and cannabis use during pregnancy on visuo-perceptual processing ability (b = -0.019, p = .009) and intracranial volumes (b = -6338.309, p = .009). We found that the effects of exposure to cannabis during pregnancy are not uniform at all times and may gradually become more apparent and magnified as development progresses.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2023/02/06

Authors

Hiraoka D, Makita K, Hamatani S, Tomoda A, Mizuno Y

Keywords

Cognitive development, Longitudinal data, Marijuana, Neurodevelopment, Prenatal cannabis exposure

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2023.101209
Toggle Morphometry of the lateral orbitofrontal cortex is associated with eating dispositions in early adolescence: findings from a large population-based study. Social cognitive and affective neuroscience Hall PA, Best JR, Danckert J, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Early adolescence is a critical period for eating behaviors as children gain autonomy around food choice and peer influences increase in potency. From a neurodevelopmental perspective, significant structural changes take place in the prefrontal cortex during this time, including the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), which is involved in socially contextualized decision-making. We examined the morphological features of the OFC in relation to food choice in a sample of 10 309 early adolescent children from the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development Study. Structural parameters of the OFC and insula were examined for relationships with two important aspects of food choice: limiting the consumption of fast/fried food and maximizing the consumption of nutritious foods. Raw, partially adjusted and fully adjusted models were evaluated. Findings revealed that a larger surface area of the lateral OFC was associated with higher odds of limiting fast/fried food consumption in raw [odds ratio (OR) = 1.07, confidence interval (CI): 1.02, 1.12, P = 0.002, PFDR = 0.012], partially adjusted (OR = 1.11, CI: 1.03, 1.19, P = 0.004, PFDR = 0.024) and fully adjusted models (OR = 1.11, CI: 1.03, 1.19, P = 0.006, PFDR = 0.036). In contrast, a larger insula volume was associated with lower odds of maximizing healthy foods in raw (OR = 0.94, CI: 0.91, 0.97, P <0.001, PFDR = 0.003) and partially adjusted (OR = 0.93, CI: 0.88, 0.98, P = 0.008, PFDR = 0.048) models. These findings refine our understanding of the OFC as a network node implicated in socially mediated eating behaviors.

Journal

Social cognitive and affective neuroscience

Published

2023/02/06

Authors

Hall PA, Best JR, Danckert J, Beaton EA, Lee JA

Keywords

MRI, OFC, adolescence, cortex, diet, eating

DOI

10.1093/scan/nsab084
Toggle Morphology of the prefrontal cortex predicts body composition in early adolescence: cognitive mediators and environmental moderators in the ABCD Study. Social cognitive and affective neuroscience Hall PA, Best JR, Beaton EA, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Morphological features of the lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) in late childhood and early adolescence may provide important clues as to the developmental etiology of clinical conditions such as obesity. Body composition measurements and structural brain imaging were performed on 11 226 youth at baseline (age 9 or 10 years) and follow-up (age 11 or 12 years). Baseline morphological features of the lateral PFC were examined as predictors of body composition. Findings revealed reliable associations between middle frontal gyrus volume, thickness and surface area and multiple indices of body composition. These findings were consistent across both time points and remained significant after covariate adjustment. Cortical thicknesses of the inferior frontal gyrus and lateral orbitofrontal cortex were also reliable predictors. Morphology effects on body composition were mediated by performance on a non-verbal reasoning task. Modest but reliable moderation effects were observed with respect to environmental self-regulatory demand after controlling for sex, race/ethnicity, income and methodological variables. Overall findings suggest that PFC morphology is a reliable predictor of body composition in early adolescence, as mediated through select cognitive functions and partially moderated by environmental characteristics.

Journal

Social cognitive and affective neuroscience

Published

2023/02/06

Authors

Hall PA, Best JR, Beaton EA, Sakib MN, Danckert J

Keywords

ABCD Study, BMI, PFC, adolescence, development, obesity

DOI

10.1093/scan/nsab104
Toggle Racial Disparities in Adversity During Childhood and the False Appearance of Race-Related Differences in Brain Structure. The American journal of psychiatry Dumornay NM, Lebois LAM, Ressler KJ, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Black Americans in the United States are disproportionately exposed to childhood adversity compared with White Americans. Such disparities may contribute to race-related differences in brain structures involved in regulating the emotional response to stress, such as the amygdala, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex (PFC). The authors investigated neuroanatomical consequences of racial disparities in adversity.

Journal

The American journal of psychiatry

Published

2023/02/01

Authors

Dumornay NM, Lebois LAM, Ressler KJ, Harnett NG

Keywords

Adversity, Brain Structure, MRI, Neuroimaging, Race Disparities, Racism, Sociopolitical Issues, Stress

DOI

10.1176/appi.ajp.21090961
Toggle Understanding Social Determinants of Brain Health During Development. The American journal of psychiatry Barch DM, Luby JL 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Journal

The American journal of psychiatry

Published

2023/02/01

Authors

Barch DM, Luby JL

Keywords

Brain Structure, Neuroimaging, Racism, Sociopolitical Issues, Stress

DOI

10.1176/appi.ajp.20220991
Toggle Association of Physical Activity and Screen Time With Body Mass Index Among US Adolescents. JAMA network open Nagata JM, Smith N, Alsamman S, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

The Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee Scientific Report identified important research gaps to inform future guidance for adolescents, including limited evidence on the importance of sedentary behaviors (screen time) and their interactions with physical activity for adolescent health outcomes, including overweight and obesity.

Journal

JAMA network open

Published

2023/02/01

Authors

Nagata JM, Smith N, Alsamman S, Lee CM, Dooley EE, Kiss O, Ganson KT, Wing D, Baker FC, Gabriel KP

Keywords

DOI

10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.55466
Toggle Bidirectional Associations Between Adiposity and Cognitive Function and Mediation by Brain Morphology in the ABCD Study. JAMA network open Sakib MN, Best JR, Hall PA 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Most epidemiologic studies examine the brain as an outcome in relation to adiposity (ie, the brain-as-outcome perspective), but it is also a potential risk factor associated with adiposity accumulation over time (ie, the brain-as-risk factor perspective). The bidirectionality hypothesis has not been fully explored in adolescent samples previously.

Journal

JAMA network open

Published

2023/02/01

Authors

Sakib MN, Best JR, Hall PA

Keywords

DOI

10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.55631
Toggle Measures of Brain Connectivity and Cognition by Sex in US Children. JAMA network open Tomasi D, Volkow ND 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

The neurobiological underpinnings underlying sex differences in cognition during adolescence are largely unknown.

Journal

JAMA network open

Published

2023/02/01

Authors

Tomasi D, Volkow ND

Keywords

DOI

10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2023.0157
Toggle Polygenic Risk for Schizophrenia, Major Depression, and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Hippocampal Subregion Volumes in Middle Childhood. Behavior genetics Pine JG, Paul SE, Johnson E, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Studies demonstrate that individuals with diagnoses for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and Schizophrenia (SCZ) may exhibit smaller hippocampal gray matter relative to otherwise healthy controls, although the effect sizes vary in each disorder. Existing work suggests that hippocampal abnormalities in each disorder may be attributable to genetic liability and/or environmental variables. The following study uses baseline data from the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development[Formula: see text] Study (ABCD Study[Formula: see text]) to address three open questions regarding the relationship between genetic risk for each disorder and hippocampal volume reductions: (a) whether polygenic risk scores (PGRS) for MDD, PTSD, and SCZ are related to hippocampal volume; (b) whether PGRS for MDD, PTSD, and SCZ are differentially related to specific hippocampal subregions along the longitudinal axis; and (c) whether the association between PGRS for MDD, PTSD, and SCZ and hippocampal volume is moderated by sex and/or environmental adversity. In short, we did not find associations between PGRS for MDD, PTSD, and SCZ to be significantly related to any hippocampal subregion volumes. Furthermore, neither sex nor enviornmental adversity significantly moderated these associations. Our study provides an important null finding on the relationship genetic risk for MDD, PTSD, and SCZ to measures of hippocampal volume.

Journal

Behavior genetics

Published

2023/01/31

Authors

Pine JG, Paul SE, Johnson E, Bogdan R, Kandala S, Barch DM

Keywords

Depression, Hippocampus, Postraumatic-stress disorder, Schizophrenia

DOI

10.1007/s10519-023-10134-1
Toggle Ambient fine particulate exposure and subcortical gray matter microarchitecture in 9- and 10-year-old children across the United States. iScience Sukumaran K, Cardenas-Iniguez C, Burnor E, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Neuroimaging studies showing the adverse effects of air pollution on neurodevelopment have largely focused on smaller samples from limited geographical locations and have implemented univariant approaches to assess exposure and brain macrostructure. Herein, we implement restriction spectrum imaging and a multivariate approach to examine how one year of annual exposure to daily fine particulate matter (PM), daily nitrogen dioxide (NO), and 8-h maximum ozone (O) at ages 9-10 years relates to subcortical gray matter microarchitecture in a geographically diverse subsample of children from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study. Adjusting for confounders, we identified a latent variable representing 66% of the variance between one year of air pollution and subcortical gray matter microarchitecture. PM was related to greater isotropic intracellular diffusion in the thalamus, brainstem, and accumbens, which related to cognition and internalizing symptoms. These findings may be indicative of previously identified air pollution-related risk for neuroinflammation and early neurodegenerative pathologies.

Journal

iScience

Published

2023/01/31

Authors

Sukumaran K, Cardenas-Iniguez C, Burnor E, Bottenhorn KL, Hackman DA, McConnell R, Berhane K, Schwartz J, Chen JC, Herting MM

Keywords

Environmental health, Environmental science, Health sciences, Neuroscience, Public health

DOI

10.1016/j.isci.2023.106087
Toggle Prenatal tobacco exposure associations with physical health and neurodevelopment in the ABCD cohort. Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association Gonzalez MR, Uban KA, Tapert SF, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

To investigate the strength and reproducibility of the teratogenic impact of prenatal tobacco exposure (PTE) on child physical health and neurodevelopmental outcomes, in the context of intersecting sociodemographic and other prenatal correlates, and test if early postnatal health mediates PTE associations with childhood outcomes.

Journal

Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association

Published

2023/01/30

Authors

Gonzalez MR, Uban KA, Tapert SF, Sowell ER

Keywords

DOI

10.1037/hea0001265
Toggle Executive Network Activation Moderates the Association between Neighborhood Threats and Externalizing Behavior in Youth. Research on child and adolescent psychopathology Conley MI, Rapuano KM, Benson-Williams C, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Neighborhood threats can increase risk for externalizing problems, including aggressive, oppositional, and delinquent behavior. Yet, there is substantial variability in how youth respond to neighborhood threats. Difficulty with cognitive functioning, particularly in the face of emotional information, may increase risk for externalizing in youth who live in neighborhoods with higher threats. However, little research has examined: 1) associations between neighborhood threats and executive networks involved in cognitive functioning or 2) whether executive networks may amplify risk for externalizing in the context of neighborhood threats. Further, most research on neighborhood threats does not account for youth’s experiences in other social contexts. Utilizing the large, sociodemographically diverse cohort of youth (ages 9-10) included in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study, we identified four latent profiles of youth based on threats in their neighborhoods, families, and schools: low threat in all contexts, elevated family threat, elevated neighborhood threat, and elevated threat in all contexts. The elevated neighborhood threat and elevated all threat profiles showed lower behavioral performance on an emotional n-back task relative to low threat and elevated family threat profiles. Lower behavioral performance in the elevated neighborhood threat profile specifically was paralleled by lower executive network activity during a cognitive challenge. Moreover, among youth with lower executive network activity, higher probability of membership in the elevated neighborhood threat profile was associated with higher externalizing. Together, these results provide evidence that interactions between threats that are concentrated in youth’s neighborhoods and attenuated executive network function may contribute to risk for externalizing problems.

Journal

Research on child and adolescent psychopathology

Published

2023/01/27

Authors

Conley MI, Rapuano KM, Benson-Williams C, Rosenberg MD, Watts R, Bell C, Casey BJ, Baskin-Sommers A

Keywords

Cognitive functioning, Executive networks, Externalizing, Neighborhood, Threat, Youth

DOI

10.1007/s10802-022-01003-2
Toggle Superficial white matter analysis: An efficient point-cloud-based deep learning framework with supervised contrastive learning for consistent tractography parcellation across populations and dMRI acquisitions. Medical image analysis Xue T, Zhang F, Zhang C, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Diffusion MRI tractography is an advanced imaging technique that enables in vivo mapping of the brain’s white matter connections. White matter parcellation classifies tractography streamlines into clusters or anatomically meaningful tracts. It enables quantification and visualization of whole-brain tractography. Currently, most parcellation methods focus on the deep white matter (DWM), whereas fewer methods address the superficial white matter (SWM) due to its complexity. We propose a novel two-stage deep-learning-based framework, Superficial White Matter Analysis (SupWMA), that performs an efficient and consistent parcellation of 198 SWM clusters from whole-brain tractography. A point-cloud-based network is adapted to our SWM parcellation task, and supervised contrastive learning enables more discriminative representations between plausible streamlines and outliers for SWM. We train our model on a large-scale tractography dataset including streamline samples from labeled long- and medium-range (over 40 mm) SWM clusters and anatomically implausible streamline samples, and we perform testing on six independently acquired datasets of different ages and health conditions (including neonates and patients with space-occupying brain tumors). Compared to several state-of-the-art methods, SupWMA obtains highly consistent and accurate SWM parcellation results on all datasets, showing good generalization across the lifespan in health and disease. In addition, the computational speed of SupWMA is much faster than other methods.

Journal

Medical image analysis

Published

2023/01/23

Authors

Xue T, Zhang F, Zhang C, Chen Y, Song Y, Golby AJ, Makris N, Rathi Y, Cai W, O'Donnell LJ

Keywords

Deep learning, Diffusion MRI, Point cloud, Superficial white matter parcellation, Supervised contrastive learning, Tractography

DOI

10.1016/j.media.2023.102759
Toggle Sleep Quality and Duration in Children That Consume Caffeine: Impact of Dose and Genetic Variation in ADORA2A and CYP1A Genes Jessel CD, Narang A, Zuberi R, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Caffeine is the most consumed drug in the world, and it is commonly used by children. Despite being considered relatively safe, caffeine can have marked effects on sleep. Studies in adults suggest that genetic variants in the adenosine A2A receptor (, rs5751876) and cytochrome P450 1A (, rs2472297, rs762551) loci are correlated with caffeine-associated sleep disturbances and caffeine intake (dose), but these associations have not been assessed in children. We examined the independent and interaction effects of daily caffeine dose and candidate variants in and on the sleep quality and duration in 6112 children aged 9-10 years who used caffeine and were enrolled in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study. We found that children with higher daily caffeine doses had lower odds of reporting > 9 h of sleep per night (OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.74-0.88, and = 1.2 × 10). For every mg/kg/day of caffeine consumed, there was a 19% (95% CI = 12-26%) decrease in the odds of children reporting > 9 h of sleep. However, neither nor genetic variants were associated with sleep quality, duration, or caffeine dose. Likewise, genotype by caffeine dose interactions were not detected. Our findings suggest that a daily caffeine dose has a clear negative correlation with sleep duration in children, but this association is not moderated by the or genetic variation.

Journal

Genes

Published

2023/01/22

Authors

Jessel CD, Narang A, Zuberi R, Bousman CA

Keywords

caffeine, dose–response, genotype, sleep

DOI

10.3390/genes14020289
Toggle Gender Differences in Adolescents' Affective Symptoms and Behavioral Disorders After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. The Journal of head trauma rehabilitation Veliz PT, Berryhill ME 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) are considered self-limiting and full recovery is expected. Recent studies identify deficits persisting years after mTBI. Large-scale prospective data permit testing the hypothesis that mTBI increases incidence of affective and behavioral symptoms after new, past , or new and past mTBI.

Journal

The Journal of head trauma rehabilitation

Published

2023/01/21

Authors

Veliz PT, Berryhill ME

Keywords

DOI

10.1097/HTR.0000000000000851
Toggle Characterizing Alcohol Expectancies in the ABCD Study: Associations with Sociodemographic Factors, the Immediate Social Environment, and Genetic Propensities. Behavior genetics Johnson EC, Paul SE, Baranger DAA, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Alcohol expectancies (AEs) are associated with likelihood of alcohol initiation and subsequent alcohol use disorders. It is unclear whether genetic predisposition to alcohol use and/or related traits contributes to shaping how one expects to feel when drinking alcohol. We used the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study to examine associations between genetic propensities (i.e., polygenic risk for problematic alcohol use, depression, risk-taking), sociodemographic factors (i.e., parent income), and the immediate social environment (i.e., peer use and disapproval toward alcohol) and positive and negative AEs in alcohol-naïve children (max analytic N = 5,352). Mixed-effect regression models showed that age, parental education, importance of the child’s religious beliefs, adverse childhood experiences, and peer disapproval of alcohol use were associated with positive and/or negative AEs, to varying degrees. Overall, our results suggest several familial and psychosocial predictors of AEs but little evidence of contributions from polygenic liability to problematic alcohol use or related phenotypes.

Journal

Behavior genetics

Published

2023/01/20

Authors

Johnson EC, Paul SE, Baranger DAA, Hatoum AS, Colbert SMC, Lin S, Wolff R, Gorelik AJ, Hansen I, Karcher NR, Bogdan R, Agrawal A

Keywords

Adverse childhood experiences, Alcohol expectancies, Educational attainment, Peer deviance, Polygenic risk scores, Religiosity

DOI

10.1007/s10519-023-10133-2
Toggle Relations Between Executive Functioning and Internalizing Symptoms Vary as a Function of Frontoparietal-amygdala Resting State Connectivity. Research on child and adolescent psychopathology Gunther KE, Petrie D, Pérez-Edgar K, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

The prefrontal cortex and the frontoparietal network are associated with a variety of regulatory behaviors. Functional connections between these brain regions and the amygdala are implicated in risk for anxiety disorders. The prefrontal cortex and frontoparietal network are also linked to executive functioning, or behaviors that help orient action towards higher order goals. Where much research has been focused on deleterious effects of under-controlled behavior, a body of work suggests that over-controlled behavior may also pose a risk for internalizing problems. Indeed, while work suggests that high levels of attention shifting may still be protective against internalizing problems, there is evidence that high levels of inhibitory control may be a risk factor for socioemotional difficulties. In the ABCD sample, which offers large sample sizes as well as sociodemographic diversity, we test the interaction between frontoparietal network-amygdala resting state functional connectivity and executive functioning behaviors on longitudinal changes in internalizing symptoms from approximately 10 to 12 years of age. We found that higher proficiency in attention shifting indeed predicts fewer internalizing behaviors over time. In addition, higher proficiency in inhibitory control predicts fewer internalizing symptoms over time, but only for children showing resting state connectivity moderately above the sample average between the frontoparietal network and amygdala. This finding supports the idea that top-down control may not be adaptive for all children, and relations between executive functioning and anxiety risk may vary as a function of trait-level regulation.

Journal

Research on child and adolescent psychopathology

Published

2023/01/20

Authors

Gunther KE, Petrie D, Pérez-Edgar K, Geier C

Keywords

Anxiety risk, Executive functioning, Frontoamygdala connectivity, Frontoparietal network, Internalizing symptoms

DOI

10.1007/s10802-023-01025-4
Toggle Overlapping brain correlates of superior cognition among children at genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease and/or major depressive disorder. Scientific reports Petrican R, Paine AL, Escott-Price V, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Early life adversity (ELA) tends to accelerate neurobiological ageing, which, in turn, is thought to heighten vulnerability to both major depressive disorder (MDD) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The two conditions are putatively related, with MDD representing either a risk factor or early symptom of AD. Given the substantial environmental susceptibility of both disorders, timely identification of their neurocognitive markers could facilitate interventions to prevent clinical onset. To this end, we analysed multimodal data from the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development study (ages 9-10 years). To disentangle genetic from correlated genetic-environmental influences, while also probing gene-adversity interactions, we compared adoptees, a group generally exposed to substantial ELA, with children raised by their biological families via genetic risk scores (GRS) from genome-wide association studies. AD and MDD GRSs predicted overlapping and widespread neurodevelopmental alterations associated with superior fluid cognition. Specifically, among adoptees only, greater AD GRS were related to accelerated structural maturation (i.e., cortical thinning) and higher MDD GRS were linked to delayed functional neurodevelopment, as reflected in compensatory brain activation on an inhibitory control task. Our study identifies compensatory mechanisms linked to MDD risk and highlights the potential cognitive benefits of accelerated maturation linked to AD vulnerability in late childhood.

Journal

Scientific reports

Published

2023/01/18

Authors

Petrican R, Paine AL, Escott-Price V, Shelton KH

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41598-023-28057-6
Toggle Characterizing different cognitive and neurobiological profiles in a community sample of children using a non-parametric approach: An fMRI study. Developmental cognitive neuroscience Fekson VK, Michaeli T, Rosch KS, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Executive Functions (EF) is an umbrella term for a set of mental processes geared towards goal-directed behavior supporting academic skills such as reading abilities. One of the brain’s functional networks implicated in EF is the Default Mode Network (DMN). The current study uses measures of inhibitory control, a main sub-function of EF, to create cognitive and neurobiological “inhibitory control profiles” and relate them to reading abilities in a large sample (N = 5055) of adolescents aged 9-10 from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study. Using a Latent Profile Analysis (LPA) approach, data related to inhibitory control was divided into four inhibition classes. For each class, functional connectivity within the DMN was calculated from resting-state data, using a non-parametric algorithm for detecting group similarities. These inhibitory control profiles were then related to reading abilities. The four inhibitory control groups showed significantly different reading abilities, with neurobiologically different DMN segregation profiles for each class versus controls. The current study demonstrates that a community sample of children is not entirely homogeneous and is composed of different subgroups that can be differentiated both behaviorally/cognitively and neurobiologically, by focusing on inhibitory control and the DMN. Educational implications relating these results to reading abilities are noted.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2023/01/13

Authors

Fekson VK, Michaeli T, Rosch KS, Schlaggar BL, Horowitz-Kraus T

Keywords

Default Mode Network, Inhibitory control, Latent Profiles, Nonparametric approach, Reading abilities

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2023.101198
Toggle Family- and neighborhood-level environmental associations with physical health conditions in 9- and 10-year-olds. Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association Marshall AT, Adise S, Cardenas-Iniguez C, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

To determine how environmental factors are associated with physical health conditions in 9- to 10-year-old participants in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study, and how they are moderated by family-level socioeconomic status (SES).

Journal

Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association

Published

2023/01/12

Authors

Marshall AT, Adise S, Cardenas-Iniguez C, Hippolyte OK, Parchment CA, Villalobos TI, Wong LT, Cisneros CP, Kan EC, Palmer CE, Bodison SC, Herting MM, Sowell ER

Keywords

DOI

10.1037/hea0001254
Toggle Why weight? Analytic approaches for large-scale population neuroscience data. Developmental cognitive neuroscience Gard AM, Hyde LW, Heeringa SG, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Population-based neuroimaging studies that feature complex sampling designs enable researchers to generalize their results more widely. However, several theoretical and analytical questions pose challenges to researchers interested in these data. The following is a resource for researchers interested in using population-based neuroimaging data. We provide an overview of sampling designs and describe the differences between traditional model-based analyses and survey-oriented design-based analyses. To elucidate key concepts, we leverage data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development℠ Study (ABCD Study®), a population-based sample of 11,878 9-10-year-olds in the United States. Analyses revealed modest sociodemographic discrepancies between the target population of 9-10-year-olds in the U.S. and both the recruited ABCD sample and the analytic sample with usable structural and functional imaging data. In evaluating the associations between socioeconomic resources (i.e., constructs that are tightly linked to recruitment biases) and several metrics of brain development, we show that model-based approaches over-estimated the associations of household income and under-estimated the associations of caregiver education with total cortical volume and surface area. Comparable results were found in models predicting neural function during two fMRI task paradigms. We conclude with recommendations for ABCD Study® users and users of population-based neuroimaging cohorts more broadly.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2023/01/06

Authors

Gard AM, Hyde LW, Heeringa SG, West BT, Mitchell C

Keywords

ABCD Study®, Generalizability, Population neuroscience, convenience sampling, probability sampling

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2023.101196
Toggle Male-specific, replicable and functional roles of genetic variants and cerebral gray matter volumes in ADHD: a gene-wide association study across KTN1 and a region-wide functional validation across brain. Child and adolescent psychiatry and mental health Luo X, Lin X, Ide JS, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with reduction of cortical and subcortical gray matter volumes (GMVs). The kinectin 1 gene (KTN1) has recently been reported to significantly regulate GMVs and ADHD risk. In this study, we aimed to identify sex-specific, replicable risk KTN1 alleles for ADHD and to explore their regulatory effects on mRNA expression and cortical and subcortical GMVs. We examined a total of 1020 KTN1 SNPs in one discovery sample (ABCD cohort: 5573 males and 5082 females) and three independent replication European samples (Samples #1 and #2 each with 802/122 and 472/141 male/female offspring with ADHD; and Sample #3 with 14,154/4945 ADHD and 17,948/16,246 healthy males/females) to identify replicable associations within each sex. We examined the regulatory effects of ADHD-risk alleles on the KTN1 mRNA expression in two European brain cohorts (n = 348), total intracranial volume (TIV) in 46 European cohorts (n = 18,713) and the ABCD cohort, as well as the GMVs of seven subcortical structures in 50 European cohorts (n = 38,258) and of 118 cortical and subcortical regions in the ABCD cohort. We found that four KTN1 variants significantly regulated the risk of ADHD with the same direction of effect in males across discovery and replication samples (0.003 ≤ p ≤ 0.041), but none in females. All four ADHD-risk alleles significantly decreased KTN1 mRNA expression in all brain regions examined (1.2 × 10 ≤ p ≤ 0.039). The ADHD-risk alleles significantly increased basal ganglia (2.8 × 10 ≤ p ≤ 0.040) and hippocampus (p = 0.010) GMVs but reduced amygdala GMV (p = 0.030) and TIV (0.010 < p ≤ 0.013). The ADHD-risk alleles also significantly reduced some cortical (right superior temporal pole, right rectus) and cerebellar but increased other cortical (0.007 ≤ p ≤ 0.050) GMVs. To conclude, we identified a set of replicable and functional risk KTN1 alleles for ADHD, specifically in males. KTN1 may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of ADHD, and the reduction of specific cortical and subcortical, including amygdalar but not basal ganglia or hippocampal, GMVs may serve as a neural marker of the genetic effects.

Journal

Child and adolescent psychiatry and mental health

Published

2023/01/06

Authors

Luo X, Lin X, Ide JS, Luo X, Zhang Y, Xu J, Wang L, Chen Y, Cheng W, Zheng J, Wang Z, Yu T, Taximaimaiti R, Jing X, Wang X, Cao Y, Tan Y, Li CR

Keywords

ABCD, ADHD, Basal ganglia, Cortex, Gray matter volume (GMV), KTN1

DOI

10.1186/s13034-022-00536-0
Toggle Sex and age variations in the impact of puberty on cortical thickness and associations with internalizing symptoms and suicidal ideation in early adolescence. Developmental cognitive neuroscience Wiglesworth A, Fiecas MB, Xu M, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

The childhood-to-adolescence transition is a notable period of change including pubertal development, neurodevelopment, and psychopathology onset, that occurs in divergent patterns between sexes. This study examined the effects of sex and puberty on cortical thickness (CT) in children and explored whether CT changes over time related to emergence of psychopathology in early adolescence.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2023/01/04

Authors

Wiglesworth A, Fiecas MB, Xu M, Neher AT, Padilla L, Carosella KA, Roediger DJ, Mueller BA, Luciana M, Klimes-Dougan B, Cullen KR

Keywords

Cortical thickness, Developmental psychopathology, Neurodevelopment, Puberty, Sex differences, Suicidal ideation

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2022.101195
Toggle Neuroanatomical correlates of genetic risk for obesity in children. Translational psychiatry Morys F, Yu E, Shishikura M, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Obesity has a strong genetic component, with up to 20% of variance in body mass index (BMI) being accounted for by common polygenic variation. Most genetic polymorphisms associated with BMI are related to genes expressed in the central nervous system. At the same time, higher BMI is associated with neurocognitive changes. However, the direct link between genetics of obesity and neurobehavioral mechanisms related to weight gain is missing. Here, we use a large sample of participants (n > 4000) from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development cohort to investigate how genetic risk for obesity, expressed as polygenic risk score for BMI (BMI-PRS), is related to brain and behavioral measures in adolescents. In a series of analyses, we show that BMI-PRS is related to lower cortical volume and thickness in the frontal and temporal areas, relative to age-expected values. Relatedly, using structural equation modeling, we find that lower overall cortical volume is associated with higher impulsivity, which in turn is related to an increase in BMI 1 year later. In sum, our study shows that obesity might partially stem from genetic risk as expressed in brain changes in the frontal and temporal brain areas, and changes in impulsivity.

Journal

Translational psychiatry

Published

2023/01/03

Authors

Morys F, Yu E, Shishikura M, Paquola C, Vainik U, Nave G, Koellinger P, Gan-Or Z, Dagher A

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41398-022-02301-5
Toggle Concordance between substance use self-report and hair analysis in community-based adolescents. The American journal of drug and alcohol abuse Wade NE, Sullivan RM, Tapert SF, et al. 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Accurate drug use identification through subjective self-report and toxicological biosample (hair) analysis are necessary to determine substance use sequelae in youth. Yet consistency between self-reported substance use and robust, toxicological analysis in a large sample of youth is understudied. We aim to assess concordance between self-reported substance use and hair toxicological analysis in community-based adolescents. Hair results by LC-MS/MS and GC-MS/MS and self-reported past-year substance use from an Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study subsample ( = 1,390; ages 9-13; 48% female) were compared. The participants were selected for hair selection through two methods: high scores on a substance risk algorithm selected 93%; 7% were low-risk, randomly selected participants. Kappa coefficients the examined concordance between self-report and hair results. 10% of youth self-reported any past-year substance use (e.g. alcohol, cannabis, nicotine, and opiates), while a mostly non-overlapping 10% had hair results indicating recent substance use (cannabis, alcohol, non-prescription amphetamines, cocaine, nicotine, opiates, and fentanyl). In randomly selected low-risk cases, 7% were confirmed positive in hair. Combining methods, 19% of the sample self-reported substance use and/or had a positive hair sample. Kappa coefficient of concordance between self-report and hair results was low (kappa = 0.07;  = .007). Hair toxicology identified substance use in high-risk and low-risk ABCD cohort subsamples. Given low concordance between hair results and self-report, reliance on either method alone would incorrectly categorize 9% as non-users. Multiple methods for characterizing substance use history in youth improves accuracy. Larger representative samples are needed to assess the prevalence of substance use in youth.

Journal

The American journal of drug and alcohol abuse

Published

2023/01/02

Authors

Wade NE, Sullivan RM, Tapert SF, Pelham WE, Huestis MA, Lisdahl KM, Haist F

Keywords

Children, adolescents, hair toxicology, self-report concordance, substance use, substance use onset

DOI

10.1080/00952990.2023.2164931
Toggle More Than a Learning Environment: School Climate as a Protective Factor for Child Neurodevelopment and Mental Health? Biological psychiatry. Cognitive neuroscience and neuroimaging Thijssen S 2023
PubMed Record

Abstract

Journal

Biological psychiatry. Cognitive neuroscience and neuroimaging

Published

2023/01/01

Authors

Thijssen S

Keywords

DOI

10.1016/j.bpsc.2022.10.002
Toggle Neuroimaging profiling identifies distinct brain maturational subtypes of youth with mood and anxiety disorders. Molecular psychiatry Ge R, Sassi R, Yatham LN, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Mood and anxiety disorders typically begin in adolescence and have overlapping clinical features but marked inter-individual variation in clinical presentation. The use of multimodal neuroimaging data may offer novel insights into the underlying brain mechanisms. We applied Heterogeneity Through Discriminative Analysis (HYDRA) to measures of regional brain morphometry, neurite density, and intracortical myelination to identify subtypes of youth, aged 9-10 years, with mood and anxiety disorders (N = 1931) compared to typically developing youth (N = 2823). We identified three subtypes that were robust to permutation testing and sample composition. Subtype 1 evidenced a pattern of imbalanced cortical-subcortical maturation compared to the typically developing group, with subcortical regions lagging behind prefrontal cortical thinning and myelination and greater cortical surface expansion globally. Subtype 2 displayed a pattern of delayed cortical maturation indicated by higher cortical thickness and lower cortical surface area expansion and myelination compared to the typically developing group. Subtype 3 showed evidence of atypical brain maturation involving globally lower cortical thickness and surface coupled with higher myelination and neural density. Subtype 1 had superior cognitive function in contrast to the other two subtypes that underperformed compared to the typically developing group. Higher levels of parental psychopathology, family conflict, and social adversity were common to all subtypes, with subtype 3 having the highest burden of adverse exposures. These analyses comprehensively characterize pre-adolescent mood and anxiety disorders, the biopsychosocial context in which they arise, and lay the foundation for the examination of the longitudinal evolution of the subtypes identified as the study sample transitions through adolescence.

Journal

Molecular psychiatry

Published

2022/12/28

Authors

Ge R, Sassi R, Yatham LN, Frangou S

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41380-022-01925-9
Toggle Cyberbullying and Sleep Disturbance Among Early Adolescents in the U.S. Academic pediatrics Nagata JM, Yang JH, Singh G, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

To determine the association between cyberbullying (victimization and perpetration) and sleep disturbance among a demographically diverse sample of 10-14-year-old early adolescents.

Journal

Academic pediatrics

Published

2022/12/26

Authors

Nagata JM, Yang JH, Singh G, Kiss O, Ganson KT, Testa A, Jackson DB, Baker FC

Keywords

adolescent, cyberbullying, screen time, sleep, sleep disturbance

DOI

10.1016/j.acap.2022.12.007
Toggle Distinct Thalamic and Frontal Neuroanatomical Substrates in Children with Familial vs. Non-Familial Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Brain sciences Baboli R, Cao M, Halperin JM, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a highly prevalent, inheritable, and heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder. Children with a family history of ADHD are at elevated risk of having ADHD and persisting its symptoms into adulthood. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of having or not having positive family risk factor in the neuroanatomy of the brain in children with ADHD. Cortical thickness-, surface area-, and volume-based measures were extracted and compared in a total of 606 participants, including 132, 165, and 309 in groups of familial ADHD (ADHD-F), non-familial ADHD (ADHD-NF), and typically developed children, respectively. Compared to controls, ADHD probands showed significantly reduced gray matter surface area in the left cuneus. Among the ADHD subgroups, ADHD-F showed significantly increased gray matter volume in the right thalamus and significantly thinner cortical thickness in the right pars orbitalis. Among ADHD-F, an increased volume of the right thalamus was significantly correlated with a reduced DSM-oriented t-score for ADHD problems. The findings of this study may suggest that a positive family history of ADHD is associated with the structural abnormalities in the thalamus and inferior frontal gyrus; these anatomical abnormalities may significantly contribute to the emergence of ADHD symptoms.

Journal

Brain sciences

Published

2022/12/26

Authors

Baboli R, Cao M, Halperin JM, Li X

Keywords

ABCD dataset, ADHD, familial ADHD, heterogeneity, inferior frontal gyrus, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), neuroanatomy, non-familial ADHD, thalamus

DOI

10.3390/brainsci13010046
Toggle Gender identity-based disparities in self-injurious thoughts and behaviors among pre-teens in the United States. Suicide & life-threatening behavior Randall AB, van der Star A, Pennesi JL, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Transgender individuals are at heightened risk for self-injurious thoughts and behaviors (SITBs). Evidence suggests that middle childhood-aged transgender individuals experience elevated rates of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and passive suicidal ideation (SI), compared to cisgender children. Little is known about gender identity-based disparities in SI more broadly and suicidal behavior (SB) in children aged 9 and 10. The aim of this study was to examine gender identity-based disparities in SITBs among children in middle childhood (pre-teens) in a US-based sample.

Journal

Suicide & life-threatening behavior

Published

2022/12/23

Authors

Randall AB, van der Star A, Pennesi JL, Siegel JA, Blashill AJ

Keywords

disparities, middle childhood, prevalence, self-injury, suicide, transgender

DOI

10.1111/sltb.12937
Toggle General psychopathology factor (p-factor) prediction using resting-state functional connectivity and a scanner-generalization neural network. Journal of psychiatric research Hong J, Hwang J, Lee JH 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

The general psychopathology factor (p-factor) represents shared variance across mental disorders based on psychopathologic symptoms. The Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study offers an unprecedented opportunity to investigate functional networks (FNs) from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) associated with the psychopathology of an adolescent cohort (n > 10,000). However, the heterogeneities associated with the use of multiple sites and multiple scanners in the ABCD Study need to be overcome to improve the prediction of the p-factor using fMRI. We proposed a scanner-generalization neural network (SGNN) to predict the individual p-factor by systematically reducing the scanner effect for resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC). We included 6905 adolescents from 18 sites whose fMRI data were collected using either Siemens or GE scanners. The p-factor was estimated based on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) scores available in the ABCD study using exploratory factor analysis. We evaluated the Pearson’s correlation coefficients (CCs) for p-factor prediction via leave-one/two-site-out cross-validation (LOSOCV/LTSOCV) and identified important FNs from the weight features (WFs) of the SGNN. The CCs were higher for the SGNN than for alternative models when using both LOSOCV (0.1631 ± 0.0673 for the SGNN vs. 0.1497 ± 0.0710 for kernel ridge regression [KRR]; p < 0.05 from a two-tailed paired t-test) and LTSOCV (0.1469 ± 0.0381 for the SGNN vs. 0.1394 ± 0.0359 for KRR; p = 0.01). It was found that (a) the default-mode and dorsal attention FNs were important for p-factor prediction, and (b) the intra-visual FN was important for scanner generalization. We demonstrated the efficacy of our novel SGNN model for p-factor prediction while simultaneously eliminating scanner-related confounding effects for RSFC.

Journal

Journal of psychiatric research

Published

2022/12/23

Authors

Hong J, Hwang J, Lee JH

Keywords

Data harmonization, Deep neural networks, Functional networks, Psychopathology, Scanner effect, p-factor

DOI

10.1016/j.jpsychires.2022.12.037
Toggle A cognitive process modeling framework for the ABCD study stop-signal task. Developmental cognitive neuroscience Weigard A, Matzke D, Tanis C, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

The Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study is a longitudinal neuroimaging study of unprecedented scale that is in the process of following over 11,000 youth from middle childhood though age 20. However, a design feature of the study’s stop-signal task violates “context independence”, an assumption critical to current non-parametric methods for estimating stop-signal reaction time (SSRT), a key measure of inhibitory ability in the study. This has led some experts to call for the task to be changed and for previously collected data to be used with caution. We present a cognitive process modeling framework, the RDEX-ABCD model, that provides a parsimonious explanation for the impact of this design feature on “go” stimulus processing and successfully accounts for key behavioral trends in the ABCD data. Simulation studies using this model suggest that failing to account for the context independence violations in the ABCD design can lead to erroneous inferences in several realistic scenarios. However, we demonstrate that RDEX-ABCD effectively addresses these violations and can be used to accurately measure SSRT along with an array of additional mechanistic parameters of interest (e.g., attention to the stop signal, cognitive efficiency), advancing investigators’ ability to draw valid and nuanced inferences from ABCD data. AVAILABILITY OF DATA AND MATERIALS: Data from the ABCD Study are available through the NIH Data Archive (NDA): nda.nih.gov/abcd. Code for all analyses featured in this study is openly available on the Open Science Framework (OSF): osf.io/2h8a7/.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2022/12/22

Authors

Weigard A, Matzke D, Tanis C, Heathcote A

Keywords

Bayesian cognitive modeling, Evidence accumulation, Inhibition, Parameter recovery, Trigger failure

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2022.101191
Toggle Differences in the functional brain architecture of sustained attention and working memory in youth and adults. PLoS biology Kardan O, Stier AJ, Cardenas-Iniguez C, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Sustained attention (SA) and working memory (WM) are critical processes, but the brain networks supporting these abilities in development are unknown. We characterized the functional brain architecture of SA and WM in 9- to 11-year-old children and adults. First, we found that adult network predictors of SA generalized to predict individual differences and fluctuations in SA in youth. A WM model predicted WM performance both across and within children-and captured individual differences in later recognition memory-but underperformed in youth relative to adults. We next characterized functional connections differentially related to SA and WM in youth compared to adults. Results revealed 2 network configurations: a dominant architecture predicting performance in both age groups and a secondary architecture, more prominent for WM than SA, predicting performance in each age group differently. Thus, functional connectivity (FC) predicts SA and WM in youth, with networks predicting WM performance differing more between youths and adults than those predicting SA.

Journal

PLoS biology

Published

2022/12/21

Authors

Kardan O, Stier AJ, Cardenas-Iniguez C, Schertz KE, Pruin JC, Deng Y, Chamberlain T, Meredith WJ, Zhang X, Bowman JE, Lakhtakia T, Tindel L, Avery EW, Lin Q, Yoo K, Chun MM, Berman MG, Rosenberg MD

Keywords

DOI

10.1371/journal.pbio.3001938
Toggle Machine learning approaches linking brain function to behavior in the ABCD STOP task. Human brain mapping Yuan D, Hahn S, Allgaier N, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

The stop-signal task (SST) is one of the most common fMRI tasks of response inhibition, and its performance measure, the stop-signal reaction-time (SSRT), is broadly used as a measure of cognitive control processes. The neurobiology underlying individual or clinical differences in response inhibition remain unclear, consistent with the general pattern of quite modest brain-behavior associations that have been recently reported in well-powered large-sample studies. Here, we investigated the potential of multivariate, machine learning (ML) methods to improve the estimation of individual differences in SSRT with multimodal structural and functional region of interest-level neuroimaging data from 9- to 11-year-olds children in the ABCD Study. Six ML algorithms were assessed across modalities and fMRI tasks. We verified that SST activation performed best in predicting SSRT among multiple modalities including morphological MRI (cortical surface area/thickness), diffusion tensor imaging, and fMRI task activations, and then showed that SST activation explained 12% of the variance in SSRT using cross-validation and out-of-sample lockbox data sets (n = 7298). Brain regions that were more active during the task and that showed more interindividual variation in activation were better at capturing individual differences in performance on the task, but this was only true for activations when successfully inhibiting. Cortical regions outperformed subcortical areas in explaining individual differences but the two hemispheres performed equally well. These results demonstrate that the detection of reproducible links between brain function and performance can be improved with multivariate approaches and give insight into a number of brain systems contributing to individual differences in this fundamental cognitive control process.

Journal

Human brain mapping

Published

2022/12/19

Authors

Yuan D, Hahn S, Allgaier N, Owens MM, Chaarani B, Potter A, Garavan H

Keywords

adolescence, big data, fMRI, important feature, machine learning, multimodality, stop-signal reaction time, stop-signal task

DOI

10.1002/hbm.26172
Toggle Lower daily steps among U.S. adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic: Objective findings from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study. Preventive medicine reports Nagata JM, Yu J, Dooley EE, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Journal

Preventive medicine reports

Published

2022/12/19

Authors

Nagata JM, Yu J, Dooley EE, Baker FC, Alsamman S, Wing D, Ganson KT, Pettee Gabriel K

Keywords

ABCD, Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development, Adolescent, Covid-19, Fitbit, Pandemic, Physical activity, Steps

DOI

10.1016/j.pmedr.2022.102095
Toggle Genetic risk of AUDs and childhood impulsivity: Examining the role of parenting and family environment. Development and psychopathology Su J, Trevino A, Jamil B, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

This study examined the independent and interactive effects of genetic risk for alcohol use disorder (AUD), parenting behaviors, and family environment on childhood impulsivity. Data were drawn from White ( = 5,991), Black/African American ( = 1,693), and Hispanic/Latino ( = 2,118) youth who completed the baseline assessment (age 9-10) and had genotypic data available from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study. Participants completed questionnaires and provided saliva or blood samples for genotyping. Results indicated no significant main effects of AUD genome-wide polygenic scores (AUD-PRS) on childhood impulsivity as measured by the UPPS-P scale across racial/ethnic groups. In general, parental monitoring and parental acceptance were associated with lower impulsivity; family conflict was associated with higher impulsivity. There was an interaction effect between AUD-PRS and family conflict, such that family conflict exacerbated the association between AUD-PRS and positive urgency, only among Black/African American youth. This was the only significant interaction effect detected from a total of 45 tests (five impulsivity dimensions, three subsamples, and three family factors), and thus may be a false positive and needs to be replicated. These findings highlight the important role of parenting behaviors and family conflict in relation to impulsivity among children.

Journal

Development and psychopathology

Published

2022/12/16

Authors

Su J, Trevino A, Jamil B, Aliev F

Keywords

alcohol, family conflict, impulsivity, parenting, polygenic score

DOI

10.1017/S095457942200092X
Toggle Fast Image-Level MRI Harmonization via Spectrum Analysis. Machine learning in medical imaging. MLMI (Workshop) Guan H, Liu S, Lin W, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Pooling structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data from different imaging sites helps increase sample size to facilitate machine learning based neuroimage analysis, but usually suffers from significant cross-site and/or cross-scanner data heterogeneity. Existing studies often focus on reducing cross-site and/or cross-scanner heterogeneity at handcrafted feature level targeting specific tasks (e.g., classification or segmentation), limiting their adaptability in clinical practice. Research on image-level MRI harmonization targeting a broad range of applications is very limited. In this paper, we develop a spectrum swapping based image-level MRI harmonization (SSIMH) framework. Different from previous work, our method focuses on alleviating cross-scanner heterogeneity at . We first construct to explore the influences of different frequency components on MRI harmonization. We then utilize a method for the harmonization of raw MRIs acquired by different scanners. Our method does not rely on complex model training, and can be directly applied to fast real-time MRI harmonization. Experimental results on T1- and T2-weighted MRIs of phantom subjects acquired by using different scanners from the public ABCD dataset suggest the effectiveness of our method in structural MRI harmonization at the image level.

Journal

Machine learning in medical imaging. MLMI (Workshop)

Published

2022/12/16

Authors

Guan H, Liu S, Lin W, Yap PT, Liu M

Keywords

Image-level harmonization, MRI, Spectrum analysis

DOI

10.1007/978-3-031-21014-3_21
Toggle Performance scaling for structural MRI surface parcellations: a machine learning analysis in the ABCD Study. Cerebral cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991) Hahn S, Owens MM, Yuan D, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

The use of predefined parcellations on surface-based representations of the brain as a method for data reduction is common across neuroimaging studies. In particular, prediction-based studies typically employ parcellation-driven summaries of brain measures as input to predictive algorithms, but the choice of parcellation and its influence on performance is often ignored. Here we employed preprocessed structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study® to examine the relationship between 220 parcellations and out-of-sample predictive performance across 45 phenotypic measures in a large sample of 9- to 10-year-old children (N = 9,432). Choice of machine learning (ML) pipeline and use of alternative multiple parcellation-based strategies were also assessed. Relative parcellation performance was dependent on the spatial resolution of the parcellation, with larger number of parcels (up to ~4,000) outperforming coarser parcellations, according to a power-law scaling of between 1/4 and 1/3. Performance was further influenced by the type of parcellation, ML pipeline, and general strategy, with existing literature-based parcellations, a support vector-based pipeline, and ensembling across multiple parcellations, respectively, as the highest performing. These findings highlight the choice of parcellation as an important influence on downstream predictive performance, showing in some cases that switching to a higher resolution parcellation can yield a relatively large boost to performance.

Journal

Cerebral cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991)

Published

2022/12/15

Authors

Hahn S, Owens MM, Yuan D, Juliano AC, Potter A, Garavan H, Allgaier N

Keywords

machine learning, neuroimaging, parcellations, sMRI, surface

DOI

10.1093/cercor/bhac060
Toggle Adherence to 24-Hour Movement Recommendations and Health Indicators in Early Adolescence: Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Associations in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study. The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine Fung H, Yeo BTT, Chen C, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Adherence to 24-hour movement guidelines of ≥60 minutes of physical activity, ≤2 hours of screen time, and 9-11 hours of sleep has been shown to benefit cognitive, physical, and psychosocial health in children and young adolescents aged 5-13 years. However, these findings have mostly been based on cross-sectional studies or relatively small samples and the associations between adherence to guidelines and brain structure remain to be evaluated.

Journal

The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine

Published

2022/12/15

Authors

Fung H, Yeo BTT, Chen C, Lo JC, Chee MWL, Ong JL

Keywords

Adolescents, BMI, Brain morphometry, Children, Cognition, Movement behaviors, Physical activity, Psychosocial health, Screen time, Sleep

DOI

10.1016/j.jadohealth.2022.10.019
Toggle Access to quality health resources and environmental toxins affect the relationship between brain structure and BMI in a sample of pre and early adolescents. Frontiers in public health Adise S, Marshall AT, Kan E, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Environmental resources are related to childhood obesity risk and altered brain development, but whether these relationships are stable or if they have sustained impact is unknown. Here, we utilized a multidimensional index of childhood neighborhood conditions to compare the influence of various social and environmental disparities (SED) on body mass index (BMI)-brain relationships over a 2-year period in early adolescence.

Journal

Frontiers in public health

Published

2022/12/15

Authors

Adise S, Marshall AT, Kan E, Sowell ER

Keywords

adolescence, area deprivation, built environment, health policy, neighborhood deprivation, pediatric obesity, structural MRI, structural brain development

DOI

10.3389/fpubh.2022.1061049
Toggle Rare copy number variants in males and females with childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Molecular psychiatry Jung B, Ahn K, Justice C, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

While childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is more prevalent in males than females, genetic contributors to this effect have not been established. Here, we explore sex differences in the contribution of common and/or rare genetic variants to ADHD. Participants were from the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development study (N = 1253 youth meeting DSM-5 criteria for ADHD [mean age = 11.46 years [SD = 0.87]; 31% female] and 5577 unaffected individuals [mean age = 11.42 years [SD = 0.89]; 50% female], overall 66% White, non-Hispanic (WNH), 19% Black/African American, and 15% other races. Logistic regression tested for interactions between sex (defined genotypically) and both rare copy number variants (CNV) and polygenic (common variant) risk in association with ADHD. There was a significant interaction between sex and the presence of a CNV deletion larger than 200 kb, both in the entire cohort (β = -0.74, CI = [-1.27 to -0.20], FDR-corrected p = 0.048) and, at nominal significance levels in the WNH ancestry subcohort (β = -0.86, CI = [-1.51 to -0.20], p = 0.010). Additionally, the number of deleted genes interacted with sex in association with ADHD (whole cohort. β = -0.13, CI = [-0.23 to -0.029], FDR-corrected p = 0.048; WNH. β = -0.17, CI = [-0.29 to -0.050], FDR-corrected p = 0.044) as did the total length of CNV deletions (whole cohort. β = -0.12, CI = [-0.19 to -0.044], FDR-corrected p = 0.028; WNH. β = -0.17, CI = [-0.28 to -0.061], FDR-corrected p = 0.034). This sex effect was driven by increased odds of childhood ADHD for females but not males in the presence of CNV deletions. No similar sex effect was found for CNV duplications or polygenic risk scores. The association between CNV deletions and ADHD was partially mediated by measures of cognitive flexibility. In summary, CNV deletions were associated with increased odds for childhood ADHD in females, but not males.

Journal

Molecular psychiatry

Published

2022/12/14

Authors

Jung B, Ahn K, Justice C, Norman L, Price J, Sudre G, Shaw P

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41380-022-01906-y
Toggle Modeling environment through a general exposome factor in two independent adolescent cohorts. Exposome Moore TM, Visoki E, Argabright ST, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Exposures to perinatal, familial, social, and physical environmental stimuli can have substantial effects on human development. We aimed to generate a single measure that capture’s the complex network structure of the environment (ie, exposome) using multi-level data (participant’s report, parent report, and geocoded measures) of environmental exposures (primarily from the psychosocial environment) in two independent adolescent cohorts: The Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study (ABCD Study,  = 11 235; mean age, 10.9 years; 47.7% females) and an age- and sex-matched sample from the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort (PNC,  = 4993). We conducted a series of data-driven iterative factor analyses and bifactor modeling in the ABCD Study, reducing dimensionality from 348 variables tapping to environment to six orthogonal exposome subfactors and a general (adverse) exposome factor. The general exposome factor was associated with overall psychopathology ( = 0.28, 95% CI, 0.26-0.3) and key health-related outcomes: obesity (odds ratio [OR] , 1.4; 95% CI, 1.3-1.5) and advanced pubertal development (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.2-1.5). A similar approach in PNC reduced dimensionality of environment from 29 variables to 4 exposome subfactors and a general exposome factor. PNC analyses yielded consistent associations of the general exposome factor with psychopathology ( = 0.15; 95% CI, 0.13-0.17), obesity (OR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.3-1.6), and advanced pubertal development (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1-1.6). In both cohorts, inclusion of exposome factors greatly increased variance explained in overall psychopathology compared with models relying solely on demographics and parental education (from <4% to >38% in ABCD; from <4% to >18.5% in PNC). Findings suggest that a general exposome factor capturing multi-level environmental exposures can be derived and can consistently explain variance in youth’s mental and general health.

Journal

Exposome

Published

2022/12/14

Authors

Moore TM, Visoki E, Argabright ST, Didomenico GE, Sotelo I, Wortzel JD, Naeem A, Gur RC, Gur RE, Warrier V, Guloksuz S, Barzilay R

Keywords

allostatic load, child adolescent psychiatry, mental health, obesity, stress

DOI

10.1093/exposome/osac010
Toggle Screen Time and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Among Children 9-10 Years Old: A Prospective Cohort Study. The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine Nagata JM, Chu J, Zamora G, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

The aim of this study is to determine the prospective associations between baseline screen time and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) at 2-year follow-up in a national (United States) cohort of 9- to 10-year-old children.

Journal

The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine

Published

2022/12/12

Authors

Nagata JM, Chu J, Zamora G, Ganson KT, Testa A, Jackson DB, Costello CR, Murray SB, Baker FC

Keywords

Adolescent, Obsessive-compulsive disorder, Screen time, Video, Video game

DOI

10.1016/j.jadohealth.2022.10.023
Toggle A genetically informed Registered Report on adverse childhood experiences and mental health. Nature human behaviour Baldwin JR, Sallis HM, Schoeler T, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Children who experience adversities have an elevated risk of mental health problems. However, the extent to which adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) cause mental health problems remains unclear, as previous associations may partly reflect genetic confounding. In this Registered Report, we used DNA from 11,407 children from the United Kingdom and the United States to investigate gene-environment correlations and genetic confounding of the associations between ACEs and mental health. Regarding gene-environment correlations, children with higher polygenic scores for mental health problems had a small increase in odds of ACEs. Regarding genetic confounding, elevated risk of mental health problems in children exposed to ACEs was at least partially due to pre-existing genetic risk. However, some ACEs (such as childhood maltreatment and parental mental illness) remained associated with mental health problems independent of genetic confounding. These findings suggest that interventions addressing heritable psychiatric vulnerabilities in children exposed to ACEs may help reduce their risk of mental health problems.

Journal

Nature human behaviour

Published

2022/12/08

Authors

Baldwin JR, Sallis HM, Schoeler T, Taylor MJ, Kwong ASF, Tielbeek JJ, Barkhuizen W, Warrier V, Howe LD, Danese A, McCrory E, Rijsdijk F, Larsson H, Lundström S, Karlsson R, Lichtenstein P, Munafò M, Pingault JB

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41562-022-01482-9
Toggle Differences in cortical morphology and child internalizing or externalizing problems: Accounting for the co-occurrence. JCPP advances Zhang Y, Xu B, Kim HH, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Childhood internalizing and externalizing problems frequently co-occur. Many studies report neural correlates of either internalizing or externalizing problems, but few account for their co-occurrence. We aimed to assess specific cortical substrates of these psychiatric problems.

Journal

JCPP advances

Published

2022/12/07

Authors

Zhang Y, Xu B, Kim HH, Muetzel R, Delaney SW, Tiemeier H

Keywords

adolescence, comorbidity, externalizing disorder, internalizing disorder, neuroimaging

DOI

10.1002/jcv2.12114
Toggle Morphometric dis-similarity between cortical and subcortical areas underlies cognitive function and psychiatric symptomatology: a preadolescence study from ABCD. Molecular psychiatry Wu X, Palaniyappan L, Yu G, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Preadolescence is a critical period characterized by dramatic morphological changes and accelerated cortico-subcortical development. Moreover, the coordinated development of cortical and subcortical regions underlies the emerging cognitive functions during this period. Deviations in this maturational coordination may underlie various psychiatric disorders that begin during preadolescence, but to date these deviations remain largely uncharted. We constructed a comprehensive whole-brain morphometric similarity network (MSN) from 17 neuroimaging modalities in a large preadolescence sample (N = 8908) from Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study and investigated its association with 10 cognitive subscales and 27 psychiatric subscales or diagnoses. Based on the MSNs, each brain was clustered into five modules with distinct cytoarchitecture and evolutionary relevance. While morphometric correlation was positive within modules, it was negative between modules, especially between isocortical and paralimbic/subcortical modules; this developmental dissimilarity was genetically linked to synapse and neurogenesis. The cortico-subcortical dissimilarity becomes more pronounced longitudinally in healthy children, reflecting developmental differentiation of segregated cytoarchitectonic areas. Higher cortico-subcortical dissimilarity (between the isocortical and paralimbic/subcortical modules) were related to better cognitive performance. In comparison, children with poor modular differentiation between cortex and subcortex displayed higher burden of externalizing and internalizing symptoms. These results highlighted cortical-subcortical morphometric dissimilarity as a dynamic maturational marker of cognitive and psychiatric status during the preadolescent stage and provided insights into brain development.

Journal

Molecular psychiatry

Published

2022/12/06

Authors

Wu X, Palaniyappan L, Yu G, Zhang K, Seidlitz J, Liu Z, Kong X, Schumann G, Feng J, Sahakian BJ, Robbins TW, Bullmore E, Zhang J

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41380-022-01896-x
Toggle An Update on NIH Programs Relevant to Child Brain Health Research: ECHO, ABCD, HBCD, and MIRA. Journal of neurosurgical anesthesiology Price JC, Lee JJ, Saraiya N, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Journal

Journal of neurosurgical anesthesiology

Published

2022/12/06

Authors

Price JC, Lee JJ, Saraiya N, Lei S, Mintz CD

Keywords

DOI

10.1097/ANA.0000000000000875
Toggle Relating neighborhood deprivation to childhood obesity in the ABCD study: Evidence for theories of neuroinflammation and neuronal stress. Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association Adise S, Marshall AT, Kan E, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

We evaluated whether relationships between area deprivation (ADI), body mass index (BMI) and brain structure (e.g., cortical thickness, subcortical volume) during preadolescence supported the immunologic model of self-regulation failure (NI) and/or neuronal stress (NS) theories of overeating. The NI theory proposes that ADI causes structural alteration in the brain due to the neuroinflammatory effects of overeating unhealthy foods. The NS theory proposes that ADI-related stress negatively impacts brain structure, which causes stress-related overeating and subsequent obesity.

Journal

Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association

Published

2022/12/05

Authors

Adise S, Marshall AT, Kan E, Gonzalez MR, Sowell ER

Keywords

DOI

10.1037/hea0001250
Toggle Associations between socioeconomic gradients and racial disparities in preadolescent brain outcomes. Pediatric research Isaiah A, Ernst TM, Liang H, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine the extent to which socioeconomic characteristics of the home and neighborhood are associated with racial inequalities in brain outcomes.

Journal

Pediatric research

Published

2022/12/01

Authors

Isaiah A, Ernst TM, Liang H, Ryan M, Cunningham E, Rodriguez PJ, Menken M, Kaschak D, Guihen C, Reeves G, Lever N, Edwards SM, Chang L

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41390-022-02399-9
Toggle Association of Mental Health Burden With Prenatal Cannabis Exposure From Childhood to Early Adolescence: Longitudinal Findings From the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study. JAMA pediatrics Baranger DAA, Paul SE, Colbert SMC, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Journal

JAMA pediatrics

Published

2022/12/01

Authors

Baranger DAA, Paul SE, Colbert SMC, Karcher NR, Johnson EC, Hatoum AS, Bogdan R

Keywords

DOI

10.1001/jamapediatrics.2022.3191
Toggle The combination of autism and exceptional cognitive ability is associated with suicidal ideation. Neurobiology of learning and memory Casten LG, Thomas TR, Doobay AF, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Autism with co-occurring exceptional cognitive ability is often accompanied by severe internalizing symptoms and feelings of inadequacy. Whether cognitive ability also translates into greater risk for suicidal ideation is unclear. To investigate this urgent question, we examined two samples of high-ability autistic individuals for factors that were predictive of suicidal ideation. In the first sample (N = 1,074 individuals seen at a clinic specializing in gifted/talented youth), we observed a striking excess of parent-reported suicidal ideation in autistic individuals with IQ ≥ 120 (Odds Ratio = 5.9, p=0.0007). In a separate sample of SPARK participants, we confirmed higher rates of suicidal thoughts compared to non-autistic children from the ABCD cohort (combined N = 16,049, Odds Ratio = 6.8, p<2.2e-16), and further that autistic children with suicidal thoughts had significantly higher cognitive ability (p<2.2e-16) than those without. Elevated polygenic scores (PGS) for cognitive performance were associated with increased suicidal thoughts (N = 1,983, Z=2.16,p=0.03), with PGS for educational attainment trending in the same direction (Z=1.4,p=0.17). Notably, similar results were found in parents of these autistic youth, where higher PGS for educational attainment was associated with increasing thoughts of suicide (N = 736, Z=2.28,p=0.02). Taken together, these results suggest that on a phenotypic and genetic level, increasing cognitive ability is an unexpected risk factor for suicidal ideation in individuals diagnosed with, or at risk for autism.

Journal

Neurobiology of learning and memory

Published

2022/11/28

Authors

Casten LG, Thomas TR, Doobay AF, Foley-Nicpon M, Kramer S, Nickl-Jockschat T, Abel T, Assouline S, Michaelson JJ

Keywords

Autism, Cognition, Genetics, Intelligence, Mental health, Polygenic scores, Psychiatry, Suicide, Twice-exceptional

DOI

10.1016/j.nlm.2022.107698
Toggle Maternal age at birth and child attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: causal association or familial confounding? Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines Baker BH, Joo YY, Park J, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Causal explanations for the association of young motherhood with increased risk for child attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) remain unclear.

Journal

Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines

Published

2022/11/28

Authors

Baker BH, Joo YY, Park J, Cha J, Baccarelli AA, Posner J

Keywords

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, environmental exposures, epidemiology, genetics, teenage mothers

DOI

10.1111/jcpp.13726
Toggle Twin study of caffeine use, ADHD, and disrupted sleep in ABCD youth. Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association Dash GF, Carter E, Karalunas SL, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Evidence suggests that caffeine use disproportionately impacts sleep functioning among youth with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The present study aimed to examine the association of caffeine use with disrupted sleep, and to test moderating effects of ADHD, by leveraging differences within twin pairs to explore potential quasi-causal (i.e., within-pair) effects.

Journal

Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association

Published

2022/11/28

Authors

Dash GF, Carter E, Karalunas SL, Hudson KA, Fair D, Feldstein Ewing SW

Keywords

DOI

10.1037/hea0001252
Toggle Adverse childhood experiences and early adolescent cyberbullying in the United States. Journal of adolescence Nagata JM, Trompeter N, Singh G, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

With the increasing use of social media and online platforms among adolescents, the relationship between traumatic life events and cyberbullying remains unclear. This study aimed to determine the associations between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and cyberbullying victimization among a racially/ethnically and socioeconomically diverse sample of early adolescents.

Journal

Journal of adolescence

Published

2022/11/28

Authors

Nagata JM, Trompeter N, Singh G, Raney J, Ganson KT, Testa A, Jackson DB, Murray SB, Baker FC

Keywords

adolescents, adverse childhood experiences, cyberbullying, pediatrics, screen time

DOI

10.1002/jad.12124
Toggle A multidimensional approach to understanding the emergence of sex differences in internalizing symptoms in adolescence. Developmental cognitive neuroscience Serio B, Kohler R, Ye F, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Women are more vulnerable to internalizing disorders (e.g., depression and anxiety). This study took an integrative developmental approach to investigate multidimensional factors associated with the emergence of sex differences in internalizing symptoms, using data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study. Indices of sex hormone levels (dehydroepiandrosterone, testosterone, and estradiol), physical pubertal development, task-based functional brain activity, family conflict, and internalizing symptoms were drawn from the ABCD study’s baseline sample (9- to 10-year-old; N = 11,844). Principal component analysis served as a data-driven dimensionality reduction technique on the internalizing subscales to yield a single robust measure of internalizing symptoms. Moderated mediation analyses assessed whether associations between known risk factors and internalizing symptoms vary by sex. Results revealed direct and indirect effects of physical pubertal development on internalizing symptoms through family conflict across sexes. No effects were found of sex hormone levels or amygdala response to fearful faces on internalizing symptoms. Females did not report overall greater internalizing symptoms relative to males, suggesting that internalizing symptoms have not yet begun to increase in females at this age. Findings provide an essential baseline for future longitudinal research on the endocrine, neurocognitive, and psychosocial factors associated with sex differences in internalizing symptoms.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2022/11/28

Authors

Serio B, Kohler R, Ye F, Lichenstein SD, Yip SW

Keywords

Adolescence, Hormones, Internalizing symptoms, Neurodevelopment, Puberty, Sex differences

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2022.101182
Toggle Recommendations for Identifying Valid Wear for Consumer-Level Wrist-Worn Activity Trackers and Acceptability of Extended Device Deployment in Children. Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) Wing D, Godino JG, Baker FC, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Self-reported physical activity is often inaccurate. Wearable devices utilizing multiple sensors are now widespread. The aim of this study was to determine acceptability of Fitbit Charge HR for children and their families, and to determine best practices for processing its objective data.

Journal

Sensors (Basel, Switzerland)

Published

2022/11/26

Authors

Wing D, Godino JG, Baker FC, Yang R, Chevance G, Thompson WK, Reuter C, Bartsch H, Wilbur A, Straub LK, Castro N, Higgins M, Colrain IM, de Zambotti M, Wade NE, Lisdahl KM, Squeglia LM, Ortigara J, Fuemmeler B, Patrick K, Mason MJ, Tapert SF, Bagot KS

Keywords

Fitbit, children, consumer wearables, physical activity

DOI

10.3390/s22239189
Toggle Variability in Cognitive Task Performance in Early Adolescence Is Associated With Stronger Between-Network Anticorrelation and Future Attention Problems. Biological psychiatry global open science Chang SE, Lenartowicz A, Hellemann GS, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Intraindividual variability (IIV) during cognitive task performance is a key behavioral index of attention and a consistent marker of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. In adults, lower IIV has been associated with anticorrelation between the default mode network (DMN) and dorsal attention network (DAN)-thought to underlie effective allocation of attention. However, whether these behavioral and neural markers of attention are 1) associated with each other and 2) can predict future attention-related deficits has not been examined in a developmental, population-based cohort.

Journal

Biological psychiatry global open science

Published

2022/11/26

Authors

Chang SE, Lenartowicz A, Hellemann GS, Uddin LQ, Bearden CE

Keywords

ABCD Study, Adolescence, Attention, Neurocognitive performance, Resting-state functional connectivity

DOI

10.1016/j.bpsgos.2022.11.003
Toggle Association between Asthma and Suicidality in 9-12-Year-Old Youths. Brain sciences Hoffman KW, Visoki E, Argabright ST, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Suicidal ideation and attempts in youth are a growing health concern, and more data are needed regarding their biological underpinnings. Asthma is a common chronic inflammatory disorder in youth and has been associated with suicidal ideation and attempts in adolescent and adult populations, but data in younger children and early adolescents are lacking. We wished to study associations of asthma with childhood suicidality considering asthma’s potential as a clinically relevant model for childhood chronic immune dysregulation.

Journal

Brain sciences

Published

2022/11/23

Authors

Hoffman KW, Visoki E, Argabright ST, Schultz LM, Didomenico GE, Tran KT, Gordon JH, Chaiyachati BH, Moore TM, Almasy L, Barzilay R

Keywords

ABCD Study, adolescents, asthma, immune dysregulation, inflammation, suicidality

DOI

10.3390/brainsci12121602
Toggle Hierarchical Modeling of Psychosocial, Parental, and Environmental Factors for Susceptibility to Tobacco Product Use in 9-10-Year-Old Children. The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine Dai HD, Pierce J, Beseler C, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Tobacco use during early adolescence can harm brain development and cause adverse health outcomes. Identifying susceptibility in early adolescence before initiation presents an opportunity for tobacco use prevention.

Journal

The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine

Published

2022/11/21

Authors

Dai HD, Pierce J, Beseler C, Abadi A, Zoucha K, Johnson R, Buckley J, Ramos AK

Keywords

Early year, Nested hierarchical model, The Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development (ABCD) study, Tobacco use susceptibility

DOI

10.1016/j.jadohealth.2022.09.021
Toggle Peer correlates of conduct problems in girls. Aggressive behavior Schiff SJ, Lee SS 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Conduct problems are increasingly prevalent in girls and they uniquely predict negative outcomes. Yet, few reliable risk factors for aggression and violence in girls and women have been identified. Although preliminary evidence suggests peer relationships may be central to the development of youth conduct problems, especially in girls, rigorous interactive models of peer risk and protective factors for conduct problems are lacking. Based on 3104 10-13-year-old girls in the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development study, we tested the independent associations of separate peer risk factors (i.e., relational aggression victimization, physical aggression victimization, and deviant peer affiliation) with multidimensional conduct problems, including their moderation by peer support. Being the victim of relational aggression, being the victim of physical aggression, and deviant peer affiliation were each positively associated with conduct problems and perpetration of aggression whereas peer support was negatively associated with youth report conduct problems and perpetration of physical aggression. Further, elevated peer support significantly attenuated the association of being the victim of relational aggression with teacher-rated conduct problems. These results highlight the sensitivity of conduct problems to peer risk factors and suggest that peer support designates important configurations of risk that differentially relate to conduct problems in girls.

Journal

Aggressive behavior

Published

2022/11/21

Authors

Schiff SJ, Lee SS

Keywords

adolescent, conduct problems, girls, peer risk, peer support

DOI

10.1002/ab.22063
Toggle Continuity versus change in latent profiles of emotion regulation and working memory during adolescence. Developmental cognitive neuroscience Huffman LG, Oshri A 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Significant structural and functional brain development occurs during early adolescence. These changes underlie developments in central neurocognitive processes such as working memory (WM) and emotion regulation (ER). The preponderance of studies modeling trajectories of adolescent brain development use variable-centered approaches, omitting attention to individual differences that may undergird neurobiological embedding of early life stress and attendant psychopathology. This preregistered, data-driven study used latent transition analysis (LTA) to identify (1) latent profiles of neural function during a WM and implicit ER task, (2) transitions in profiles across 24 months, and 3) associations between transitions, parental support, and subsequent psychopathology. Using two waves of data from the ABCD Study (Mage T1 = 10; Mage T2 = 12), we found three unique profiles of neural function at both T1 and T2. The Typical, Emotion Hypo-response, and Emotion-Hyper response profiles were characterized by, respectively: moderate amygdala activation and fusiform deactivation; high ACC, fusiform, and insula deactivation; and high amygdala, ACC, and insula response to ER. While 69.5 % remained in the Typical profile from T1 to T2, 27.8 % of the sample moved from one profile at T1 to another at T2. However, neither latent profiles nor transitions exhibited associations between parental support or psychopathology symptoms.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2022/11/19

Authors

Huffman LG, Oshri A

Keywords

Adolescence, Emotion regulation, Latent Transition Analysis, Working memory

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2022.101177
Toggle A Deeper Dive Into the Relation Between Psychotic-like Experiences and Suicidal Ideation and Behaviors in Children Across the United States. Schizophrenia bulletin Jay SY, Schiffman J, Grattan R, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Children who endorse psychotic-like experiences (PLEs) appear to be at a greater risk for suicidal ideation and behavior (SI/SB) compared to their peers who do not endorse PLEs. Despite evidence of differential relations among subtypes of PLEs and SI/SB, the research on which PLE subtypes produce the strongest associations remains mixed. Further, though there is evidence that general psychological distress may help explain the relation between PLEs and SI/SB, no research has investigated the role of distress specific to PLEs in this association.

Journal

Schizophrenia bulletin

Published

2022/11/18

Authors

Jay SY, Schiffman J, Grattan R, O'Hare K, Klaunig M, DeVylder J, Karcher NR

Keywords

early intervention, prevention, psychosis-spectrum, suicide

DOI

10.1093/schbul/sbac090
Toggle Five recommendations for using large-scale publicly available data to advance health among American Indian peoples: the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study as an illustrative case. Neuropsychopharmacology : official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology White EJ, Demuth MJ, Wiglesworth A, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) populations have suffered a history of exploitation and abuse within the context of mental health research and related fields. This history is rooted in assimilation policies, historical trauma, and cultural loss, and is promulgated through discrimination and disregard for traditional culture and community knowledge. In recognition of this history, it is imperative for researchers to utilize culturally sensitive approaches that consider the context of tribal communities to better address mental health issues for AIAN individuals. The public availability of data from large-scale studies creates both opportunities and challenges when studying mental health within AIAN populations. This manuscript has two goals; first, showcase an example of problematic use of Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study data to promulgate stereotypes about AIAN individuals and, second, in partnership with collaborators from Cherokee Nation, we provide five recommendations for utilizing data from publicly available datasets to advance health research in AIAN populations. Specifically, we argue for the consideration of (1) the heterogeneity of the communities represented, (2) the importance of focusing on AIAN health and well-being, (3) engagement of relevant communities and AIAN community leaders, (4) consideration of historical and ongoing injustices, and (5) engagement with AIAN regulatory agencies or review boards. These recommendations are founded on principles from broader indigenous research efforts emphasizing community-engaged research and principles of Indigenous Data Sovereignty and Governance.

Journal

Neuropsychopharmacology : official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology

Published

2022/11/16

Authors

White EJ, Demuth MJ, Wiglesworth A, Coser AD, Garrett BA, Kominsky TK, Jernigan V, Thompson WK, Paulus M, Aupperle R

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41386-022-01498-9
Toggle Adverse childhood experiences and binge-eating disorder in early adolescents. Journal of eating disorders Chu J, Raney JH, Ganson KT, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are common and linked to negative health outcomes. Previous studies have found associations between ACEs and binge-eating disorder (BED), though they have mainly focused on adults and use cross-sectional data. The objective of this study was to examine the associations between ACEs and BED in a large, national cohort of 9-14-year-old early adolescents in the US.

Journal

Journal of eating disorders

Published

2022/11/16

Authors

Chu J, Raney JH, Ganson KT, Wu K, Rupanagunta A, Testa A, Jackson DB, Murray SB, Nagata JM

Keywords

Adolescent health, Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), Binge-eating disorder

DOI

10.1186/s40337-022-00682-y
Toggle Mapping gene by early life stress interactions on child subcortical brain structures: A genome-wide prospective study. JCPP advances Bolhuis K, Mulder RH, de Mol CL, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Although it is well-established that both genetics and the environment influence brain development, they are typically examined separately. Here, we aimed to prospectively investigate the interactive effects of genetic variants-from a genome-wide approach-and early life stress (ELS) on child subcortical brain structures, and their association with subsequent mental health problems.

Journal

JCPP advances

Published

2022/11/16

Authors

Bolhuis K, Mulder RH, de Mol CL, Defina S, Warrier V, White T, Tiemeier H, Muetzel RL, Cecil CAM

Keywords

MRI, early life stress, gene-environment interaction, genome-wide association study, psychopathology

DOI

10.1002/jcv2.12113
Toggle Longitudinal impact of COVID-19 pandemic on mental health of children in the ABCD study cohort. Scientific reports Hamatani S, Hiraoka D, Makita K, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

A large longitudinal study on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health in children is limited. This large-scale longitudinal observational study examines the pandemic’s effects on children’s mental health while considering the effects of parental care styles. The Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study is a large-scale, longitudinal multicenter study in the United States. Of the 11,875 children aged 9-12 years in its database, 4702 subjects were selected for this study. The child behavior checklist and parental monitoring questionnaire (PMQ) were used to assess children’s mental health and parental support styles, respectively. Data collected before and during the pandemic were compared. Withdrawn/depressed and attention problems significantly worsened during compared to before the COVID-19 pandemic (p < 0.001, withdrawn/depressed; 53.4 ± 5.7 to 53.7 ± 5.9, attention problems; 53.4 ± 5.4 to 53.6 ± 5.6). However, the T scores are in the normal range both before and during the crisis. Simple slope analysis found withdrawn/depressed problems and aggressive behavior worsened when the PMQ was 1 SD below the mean, and rule-breaking behavior was improved when the PMQ was 1 SD above the mean. While the COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated children’s depressive symptoms and attention issues, the effects may be minor. Additionally, parental involvement serve as a protective factor for the child’s mental health even during the pandemic.

Journal

Scientific reports

Published

2022/11/15

Authors

Hamatani S, Hiraoka D, Makita K, Tomoda A, Mizuno Y

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41598-022-22694-z
Toggle COVID-19-related financial strain and adolescent mental health. Lancet regional health. Americas Argabright ST, Tran KT, Visoki E, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic and associated responses have induced a host of crises worldwide, including an economic recession and a global mental health crisis. The specific effects of recession on youth mental health are understudied. We aimed to examine the mechanisms by which pandemic-related financial strain may affect mental health in a diverse sample of American adolescents.

Journal

Lancet regional health. Americas

Published

2022/11/15

Authors

Argabright ST, Tran KT, Visoki E, DiDomenico GE, Moore TM, Barzilay R

Keywords

COVID-19, Child and adolescent mental health, Depression, Economic crisis, Financial strain, Stress

DOI

10.1016/j.lana.2022.100391
Toggle Cortical profiles of numerous psychiatric disorders and normal development share a common pattern. Molecular psychiatry Cao Z, Cupertino RB, Ottino-Gonzalez J, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

The neurobiological bases of the association between development and psychopathology remain poorly understood. Here, we identify a shared spatial pattern of cortical thickness (CT) in normative development and several psychiatric and neurological disorders. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to CT of 68 regions in the Desikan-Killiany atlas derived from three large-scale datasets comprising a total of 41,075 neurotypical participants. PCA produced a spatially broad first principal component (PC1) that was reproducible across datasets. Then PC1 derived from healthy adult participants was compared to the pattern of CT differences associated with psychiatric and neurological disorders comprising a total of 14,886 cases and 20,962 controls from seven ENIGMA disease-related working groups, normative maturation and aging comprising a total of 17,697 scans from the ABCD Study® and the IMAGEN developmental study, and 17,075 participants from the ENIGMA Lifespan working group, as well as gene expression maps from the Allen Human Brain Atlas. Results revealed substantial spatial correspondences between PC1 and widespread lower CT observed in numerous psychiatric disorders. Moreover, the PC1 pattern was also correlated with the spatial pattern of normative maturation and aging. The transcriptional analysis identified a set of genes including KCNA2, KCNS1 and KCNS2 with expression patterns closely related to the spatial pattern of PC1. The gene category enrichment analysis indicated that the transcriptional correlations of PC1 were enriched to multiple gene ontology categories and were specifically over-represented starting at late childhood, coinciding with the onset of significant cortical maturation and emergence of psychopathology during the prepubertal-to-pubertal transition. Collectively, the present study reports a reproducible latent pattern of CT that captures interregional profiles of cortical changes in both normative brain maturation and a spectrum of psychiatric disorders. The pubertal timing of the expression of PC1-related genes implicates disrupted neurodevelopment in the pathogenesis of the spectrum of psychiatric diseases emerging during adolescence.

Journal

Molecular psychiatry

Published

2022/11/15

Authors

Cao Z, Cupertino RB, Ottino-Gonzalez J, Murphy A, Pancholi D, Juliano A, Chaarani B, Albaugh M, Yuan D, Schwab N, Stafford J, Goudriaan AE, Hutchison K, Li CR, Luijten M, Groefsema M, Momenan R, Schmaal L, Sinha R, van Holst RJ, Veltman DJ, Wiers RW, Porjesz B, Lett T, Banaschewski T, Bokde ALW, Desrivières S, Flor H, Grigis A, Gowland P, Heinz A, Brühl R, Martinot JL, Martinot MP, Artiges E, Nees F, Orfanos DP, Paus T, Poustka L, Hohmann S, Millenet S, Fröhner JH, Robinson L, Smolka MN, Walter H, Winterer J, Schumann G, Whelan R, Bhatt RR, Zhu A, Conrod P, Jahanshad N, Thompson PM, Mackey S, Garavan H

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41380-022-01855-6
Toggle Substance use patterns in 9 to 13-year-olds: Longitudinal findings from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study. Drug and alcohol dependence reports Sullivan RM, Wade NE, Wallace AL, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Though largely substance-naïve at enrollment, a proportion of the youth in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study are expected to initiate substance use (SU) as they transition into later adolescence. With annual data from youth 9-13 years-old, this study aims to describe their SU patterns over time. Here, prevalence rates of use are reported, along with predicted odds of use while analyzing common risk-factors associated with youth SU.

Journal

Drug and alcohol dependence reports

Published

2022/11/15

Authors

Sullivan RM, Wade NE, Wallace AL, Tapert SF, Pelham WE, Brown SA, Cloak CC, Feldstein Ewing SW, Madden PAF, Martz ME, Ross JM, Kaiver CM, Wirtz HG, Heitzeg MM, Lisdahl KM

Keywords

ABCD study, Adolescence, Alcohol sipping, Children, Substance initiation, Substance use

DOI

10.1016/j.dadr.2022.100120
Toggle Prediction of gender from longitudinal MRI data via deep learning on adolescent data reveals unique patterns associated with brain structure and change over a two-year period. Journal of neuroscience methods Bi Y, Abrol A, Fu Z, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Deep learning algorithms for predicting neuroimaging data have shown considerable promise in various applications. Prior work has demonstrated that deep learning models that take advantage of the data’s 3D structure can outperform standard machine learning on several learning tasks. However, most prior research in this area has focused on neuroimaging data from adults. Within the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development (ABCD) dataset, a large longitudinal development study, we examine structural MRI data to predict gender and identify gender-related changes in brain structure. Results demonstrate that gender prediction accuracy is exceptionally high (>97%) with training epochs > 200 and that this accuracy increases with age. Brain regions identified as the most discriminative in the task under study include predominantly frontal areas and the temporal lobe. When evaluating gender predictive changes specific to a two-year increase in age, a broader set of visual, cingulate, and insular regions are revealed. Our findings show a robust gender-related structural brain change pattern, even over a small age range. This suggests that it might be possible to study how the brain changes during adolescence by looking at how these changes are related to different behavioral and environmental factors.

Journal

Journal of neuroscience methods

Published

2022/11/15

Authors

Bi Y, Abrol A, Fu Z, Chen J, Liu J, Calhoun V

Keywords

Brain Visualization, Deep Learning, Gender Classification, Structural MRI

DOI

10.1016/j.jneumeth.2022.109744
Toggle Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Behavior and Sleep Among 9- and 10-Year Old Children: Initial Findings From the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study. The Journal of early adolescence Sheth C, Huber RS, Renshaw PF, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

There has been concern about the potential sequelae of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in children. This study used data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study to investigate associations between mTBI and behavior and sleep in school-aged children. Generalized additive mixed models were run to examine the association between TBI and parent-reported Child Behavior Checklist and Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children scores. mTBI with or without loss of consciousness (LOC) in 9- and 10-year old children was associated with 1) higher internalizing, externalizing and total problems and 2) greater sleep disturbance scores on the CBCL. The study also demonstrated a higher incidence of mTBI with and without LOC in boys compared to girls. This study shows a statistically significant but modest association between mTBI and behavioral and sleep changes, suggesting that in a non-clinical, sociodemographically diverse community sample of school-aged children mTBI does not result in clinically significant behavioral or psychological sequelae.

Journal

The Journal of early adolescence

Published

2022/11/14

Authors

Sheth C, Huber RS, Renshaw PF, Yurgelun-Todd DA, McGlade EC

Keywords

Mild traumatic brain injury, mental health, school-aged children, sex differences, sleep

DOI

10.1177/02724316221117508
Toggle Caregiver monitoring, but not caregiver warmth, is associated with general cognition in two large sub-samples of youth. Developmental science Keller AS, Mackey AP, Pines A, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Individual differences in cognitive abilities emerge early during development, and children with poorer cognition are at increased risk for adverse outcomes as they enter adolescence. Caregiving plays an important role in supporting cognitive development, yet it remains unclear how specific types of caregiving behaviors may shape cognition, highlighting the need for large-scale studies. In the present study, we characterized replicable yet specific associations between caregiving behaviors and cognition in two large sub-samples of children ages 9-10 years old from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study (ABCD). Across both discovery and replication sub-samples, we found that child reports of caregiver monitoring (supervision or regular knowledge of the child’s whereabouts) were positively associated with general cognition abilities, after covarying for age, sex, household income, neighborhood deprivation, and parental education. This association was specific to the type of caregiving behavior (caregiver monitoring, but not caregiver warmth), and was most strongly associated with a broad domain of general cognition (but not executive function or learning/memory). Additionally, we found that caregiver monitoring partially mediated the association between household income and cognition, furthering our understanding of how socioeconomic disparities may contribute to disadvantages in cognitive development. Together, these findings underscore the influence of differences in caregiving behavior in shaping youth cognition. RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS: Caregiver monitoring, but not caregiver warmth, is associated with cognitive performance in youth Caregiver monitoring partially mediates the association between household income and cognition Results replicated across two large matched samples from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study (ABCD).

Journal

Developmental science

Published

2022/11/11

Authors

Keller AS, Mackey AP, Pines A, Fair D, Feczko E, Hoffmann MS, Salum GA, Barzilay R, Satterthwaite TD

Keywords

ABCD, caregiving, cognition, monitoring, socioeconomic status, warmth

DOI

10.1111/desc.13337
Toggle Genetic and Environmental Variation in Continuous Phenotypes in the ABCD Study®. Behavior genetics Maes HHM, Lapato DM, Schmitt JE, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Twin studies yield valuable insights into the sources of variation, covariation and causation in human traits. The ABCD Study® (abcdstudy.org) was designed to take advantage of four universities known for their twin research, neuroimaging, population-based sampling, and expertise in genetic epidemiology so that representative twin studies could be performed. In this paper we use the twin data to: (i) provide initial estimates of heritability for the wide range of phenotypes assessed in the ABCD Study using a consistent direct variance estimation approach, assuring that both data and methodology are sound; and (ii) provide an online resource for researchers that can serve as a reference point for future behavior genetic studies of this publicly available dataset. Data were analyzed from 772 pairs of twins aged 9-10 years at study inception, with zygosity determined using genotypic data, recruited and assessed at four twin hub sites. The online tool provides twin correlations and both standardized and unstandardized estimates of additive genetic, and environmental variation for 14,500 continuously distributed phenotypic features, including: structural and functional neuroimaging, neurocognition, personality, psychopathology, substance use propensity, physical, and environmental trait variables. The estimates were obtained using an unconstrained variance approach, so they can be incorporated directly into meta-analyses without upwardly biasing aggregate estimates. The results indicated broad consistency with prior literature where available and provided novel estimates for phenotypes without prior twin studies or those assessed at different ages. Effects of site, self-identified race/ethnicity, age and sex were statistically controlled. Results from genetic modeling of all 53,172 continuous variables, including 38,672 functional MRI variables, will be accessible via the user-friendly open-access web interface we have established, and will be updated as new data are released from the ABCD Study. This paper provides an overview of the initial results from the twin study embedded within the ABCD Study, an introduction to the primary research domains in the ABCD study and twin methodology, and an evaluation of the initial findings with a focus on data quality and suitability for future behavior genetic studies using the ABCD dataset. The broad introductory material is provided in recognition of the multidisciplinary appeal of the ABCD Study. While this paper focuses on univariate analyses, we emphasize the opportunities for multivariate, developmental and causal analyses, as well as those evaluating heterogeneity by key moderators such as sex, demographic factors and genetic background.

Journal

Behavior genetics

Published

2022/11/10

Authors

Maes HHM, Lapato DM, Schmitt JE, Luciana M, Banich MT, Bjork JM, Hewitt JK, Madden PA, Heath AC, Barch DM, Thompson WK, Iacono WG, Neale MC

Keywords

ABCD, Adolescence, Children, Cognition, Cognitive abilities, Environment, FAIR data, Genetics, Heritability, Neuroscience, Open science, Personality, Psychiatric disorders, Substance use, Twin

DOI

10.1007/s10519-022-10123-w
Toggle Parental knowledge/monitoring and adolescent substance use: A causal relationship? Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association Pelham WE, Tapert SF, Gonzalez MR, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Many studies have shown that parental knowledge/monitoring is correlated with adolescent substance use, but the association may be confounded by the many preexisting differences between families with low versus high monitoring. We attempted to produce more rigorous evidence for a causal relation using a longitudinal design that took advantage of within-family fluctuations in knowledge/monitoring during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Journal

Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association

Published

2022/11/10

Authors

Pelham WE, Tapert SF, Gonzalez MR, Wade NE, Lisdahl KM, Guillaume M, Marshall AT, Van Rinsveld A, Dick AS, Baker FC, Breslin FJ, Baskin-Sommers A, Sheth CS, Brown SA

Keywords

DOI

10.1037/hea0001245
Toggle Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms and brain morphology: Examining confounding bias. eLife Dall'Aglio L, Kim HH, Lamballais S, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Associations between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and brain morphology have been reported, although with several inconsistencies. These may partly stem from confounding bias, which could distort associations and limit generalizability. We examined how associations between brain morphology and ADHD symptoms change with adjustments for potential confounders typically overlooked in the literature (aim 1), and for the intelligence quotient (IQ) and head motion, which are generally corrected for but play ambiguous roles (aim 2).

Journal

eLife

Published

2022/11/09

Authors

Dall'Aglio L, Kim HH, Lamballais S, Labrecque J, Muetzel RL, Tiemeier H

Keywords

ADHD, brain structure, confounding, epidemiology, global health, neuroscience

DOI

10.7554/eLife.78002
Toggle Lower gestational age is associated with lower cortical volume and cognitive and educational performance in adolescence. BMC medicine Ma Q, Wang H, Rolls ET, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Gestational age (GA) is associated with later cognition and behavior. However, it is unclear how specific cognitive domains and brain structural development varies with the stepwise change of gestational duration.

Journal

BMC medicine

Published

2022/11/03

Authors

Ma Q, Wang H, Rolls ET, Xiang S, Li J, Li Y, Zhou Q, Cheng W, Li F

Keywords

Cognitive performance, Cortical structure, Gestational age, Longitudinal development, Neuroimaging

DOI

10.1186/s12916-022-02627-3
Toggle Prenatal Caffeine Exposure Is Linked to Elevated Sugar Intake and BMI, Altered Reward Sensitivity, and Aberrant Insular Thickness in Adolescents: An ABCD Investigation. Nutrients Agarwal K, Manza P, Tejeda HA, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Prenatal caffeine exposure (PCE) has been positively associated with elevated body mass index (BMI) in children. Why this association occurs is unclear, but it is possible that PCE alters the in utero development of brain structures associated with food preference, leading to more total sugar intake (TSI, grams) later in childhood. To test this hypothesis, we investigated if PCE (daily/weekly/ 0.01) of excessive PCE (vs. no exposure) with elevated BMI (daily/weekly/daily limit; consistent in boys and girls), increased TSI (daily) and insular thickness (daily/weekly), as well as low middle frontal cortex (MFC) activation (daily). Our sub-analysis revealed an association of daily/weekly PCE (vs. no exposure) with increased gram sugar intake from soft drinks. We also identified a positive relationship of excessive PCE with elevated TSI and increased insular thickness (a key gustatory region), while in a Sobel test, reward sensitivity (reduced brain reactivity to reward anticipation in MFC; tracks reward outcomes) mediated (Test statistic = 2.23; p = 0.02) the PCE-linked BMI changes in adolescents. Our findings suggest that excessive PCE might be detrimental to frontal lobe development and altered reward sensitivity to food, thereby increasing risk for elevated TSI and obesity. Our results support recommendations to limit caffeine intake during pregnancy.

Journal

Nutrients

Published

2022/11/03

Authors

Agarwal K, Manza P, Tejeda HA, Courville AB, Volkow ND, Joseph PV

Keywords

body mass index, prenatal caffeine exposure, reward sensitivity, taste processing, total sugar intake

DOI

10.3390/nu14214643
Toggle Poverty, Cortical Structure, and Psychopathologic Characteristics in Adolescence. JAMA network open Kim HH, McLaughlin KA, Chibnik LB, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Childhood poverty has been associated with increased internalizing and externalizing problems in adolescence, a period of peak onset for psychiatric problems. The underlying neural mechanisms remain unclear because longitudinal studies of poverty, brain structure, and changes in psychiatric symptoms are lacking.

Journal

JAMA network open

Published

2022/11/01

Authors

Kim HH, McLaughlin KA, Chibnik LB, Koenen KC, Tiemeier H

Keywords

DOI

10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.44049
Toggle Biopsychosocial Attributes of Single-region and Multi-region Body Pain During Early Adolescence: Analysis of the ABCD Cohort. The Clinical journal of pain Senger-Carpenter T, Scott EL, Marriott DJ, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Multi-region pain during adolescence is associated with a higher symptom burden and lower quality of life. The purpose of this study was to describe and compare the biopsychosocial attributes of single-region and multi-region pain among healthy young adolescents.

Journal

The Clinical journal of pain

Published

2022/11/01

Authors

Senger-Carpenter T, Scott EL, Marriott DJ, Lenko R, Seng J, Ploutz-Snyder R, Robinson-Lane SG, Cofield C, Chen B, Voepel-Lewis T

Keywords

DOI

10.1097/AJP.0000000000001069
Toggle Reward sensitivity and internalizing symptoms during the transition to puberty: An examination of 9-and 10-year-olds in the ABCD Study. Developmental cognitive neuroscience McNeilly EA, Saragosa-Harris NM, Mills KL, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Early pubertal timing has been linked to increased risk for internalizing psychopathology in adolescents. Work in older adolescents and adults suggests that heightened reward sensitivity may buffer risk for internalizing symptoms. However, few studies have investigated these associations during the early transition to puberty, a window of vulnerability to mental health risk. In this preregistered study, we investigated the associations among pubertal timing, internalizing symptoms, and reward sensitivity in a large, population-based sample of 11,224 9-10 year-olds from the ABCD Study®. Using split-half analysis, we tested for within-sample replications of hypothesized effects across two age- and sex-matched subsets of the sample. Early pubertal timing was associated with higher internalizing symptoms in female and male participants across samples, with 9-10 year-olds in the mid-pubertal stage at the highest risk for internalizing symptoms. Additionally, early pubertal timing was robustly associated with greater self-reported reward sensitivity in both female and male participants. We observed inconsistent evidence for a moderating role of reward sensitivity across measurement domains (self-report, behavioral, and fMRI data), several of which differed by sex, but none of these interactions replicated across samples. Together, these findings provide unique insights into early indicators of risk for internalizing psychopathology during the transition to puberty in a large, population-based, demographically diverse sample of youth.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2022/10/31

Authors

McNeilly EA, Saragosa-Harris NM, Mills KL, Dahl RE, Magis-Weinberg L

Keywords

ABCD Study, Internalizing, Puberty, Reward, Split-half analysis

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2022.101172
Toggle Sex differences in regional gray matter density in pre-adolescent binge eating disorder: a voxel-based morphometry study. Psychological medicine Murray SB, Diaz-Fong JP, Duval CJ, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Binge eating disorder (BED) is a pernicious psychiatric disorder which is linked with broad medical and psychiatric morbidity, and obesity. While BED may be characterized by altered cortical morphometry, no evidence to date examined possible sex-differences in regional gray matter characteristics among those with BED. This is especially important to consider in children, where BED symptoms often emerge coincident with rapid gray matter maturation.

Journal

Psychological medicine

Published

2022/10/28

Authors

Murray SB, Diaz-Fong JP, Duval CJ, Balkchyan AA, Nagata JM, Lee DJ, Ganson KT, Toga AW, Siegel SJ, Jann K

Keywords

Binge eating disorder, eating disorders, gray matter, gray matter morphology, voxel-based morphometry

DOI

10.1017/S0033291722003269
Toggle Bayesian multisource data integration for explainable brain-behavior analysis. Frontiers in neuroscience Chen R 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

Different data sources can provide complementary information. Moving from a simple approach based on using one data source at a time to a systems approach that integrates multiple data sources provides an opportunity to understand complex brain disorders or cognitive processes. We propose a data fusion method, called Bayesian Multisource Data Integration, to model the interactions among data sources and behavioral variables. The proposed method generates representations from data sources and uses Bayesian network modeling to associate representations with behavioral variables. The generated Bayesian network is transparent and easy to understand. Bayesian inference is used to understand how the perturbation of representation is related to behavioral changes. The proposed method was assessed on the simulated data and data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study. For the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study, we found diffusion tensor imaging and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging were synergistic in understanding the fluid intelligence composite and the total score composite in healthy youth (9-11 years of age).

Journal

Frontiers in neuroscience

Published

2022/10/28

Authors

Chen R

Keywords

Bayesian inference, Bayesian network, brain-behavior analysis, data fusion, explainable AI

DOI

10.3389/fnins.2022.1044680
Toggle State-Level Recreational Cannabis Legalization Is Not Differentially Associated with Cannabis Risk Perception Among Children: A Multilevel Regression Analysis. Cannabis and cannabinoid research Gilman JM, Iyer MT, Pottinger EG, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

As more states pass recreational cannabis laws (RCLs) for adults, there is concern that increasing (and state-sanctioned) cannabis acceptance will result in a reduced perception of risk of harm from cannabis among children. We aimed to discover whether children in states with RCLs had decreased perception of risk from cannabis compared with children in states with illicit cannabis. We analyzed data from the multisite multistate Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development Study to determine how the perception of cannabis harm among children (age at baseline: 9-10; =10,395) changes over time in states with and without RCLs. Using multilevel modeling, we assessed survey responses from children longitudinally across 3 years, adjusting for state-, family-, and participant-level clustering and child-level factors, including demographics (sex, race, and socioeconomic status), religiosity, and trait impulsivity. There was no significant main effect of state RCLs on perceived risk of cannabis use, and no differences in change over time by state RCLs, even after controlling for demographic factors and other risk (e.g., impulsivity) and protective (e.g., religiosity) factors. This analysis indicates that state-level RCLs are not associated with differential perception of cannabis risk among children, even after controlling for demographics, trait impulsivity, and religiosity. Future studies could assess how perception of risk from cannabis changes as children and adolescents continue to mature in states with and without RCLs.

Journal

Cannabis and cannabinoid research

Published

2022/10/26

Authors

Gilman JM, Iyer MT, Pottinger EG, Klugman EM, Hughes D, Potter K, Tervo-Clemmens B, Roffman JL, Evins AE

Keywords

adolescent, cannabis, cannabis laws, impulsivity, legalization, policy

DOI

10.1089/can.2022.0162
Toggle A multicohort geometric deep learning study of age dependent cortical and subcortical morphologic interactions for fluid intelligence prediction. Scientific reports Wu Y, Besson P, Azcona EA, et al. 2022
PubMed Record

Abstract

The relationship of human brain structure to cognitive function is complex, and how this relationship differs between childhood and adulthood is poorly understood. One strong hypothesis suggests the cognitive function of Fluid Intelligence (Gf) is dependent on prefrontal cortex and parietal cortex. In this work, we developed a novel graph convolutional neural networks (gCNNs) for the analysis of localized anatomic shape and prediction of Gf. Morphologic information of the cortical ribbons and subcortical structures was extracted from T1-weighted MRIs within two independent cohorts, the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study (ABCD; age: 9.93 ± 0.62 years) of children and the Human Connectome Project (HCP; age: 28.81 ± 3.70 years). Prediction combining cortical and subcortical surfaces together yielded the highest accuracy of Gf for both ABCD (R = 0.314) and HCP datasets (R = 0.454), outperforming the state-of-the-art prediction of Gf from any other brain measures in the literature. Across both datasets, the morphology of the amygdala, hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens, along with temporal, parietal and cingulate cortex consistently drove the prediction of Gf, suggesting a significant reframing of the relationship between brain morphology and Gf to include systems involved with reward/aversion processing, judgment and decision-making, motivation, and emotion.

Journal

Scientific reports

Published

2022/10/22

Authors

Wu Y, Besson P, Azcona EA, Bandt SK, Parrish TB, Breiter HC, Katsaggelos AK

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41598-022-22313-x