ABCD Study publications are authored by ABCD investigators, collaborators, and non-ABCD researchers. The analysis methodologies, findings, and interpretations expressed in these publications are those of the authors and do not constitute an endorsement by the ABCD Study®.

Please note that the publications listed here include empirical as well as non-empirical papers (e.g., focused review articles, editorials).

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Title Journal Authors Year Details
Toggle Racialized influence of parental education on adolescents’ tobacco and marijuana initiation: Mediating effects of average cortical thickness Journal of Medicine, Surgery, and Public Health Assari S, Sheikhattari P 2024
Link to Publication

Abstract

Various regions of the cerebral cortex, such as the prefrontal cortex, parahippocampal gyrus, insular cortex, temporal cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex, play critical roles in emotion regulation and executive/cognitive control. Given these regions’ involvement, it is hypothesized that average cortical thickness might play a role in mediating the socioeconomic gradient observed in substance use behaviors. However, the mechanisms through which average cortical thickness influences the differential impact of socioeconomic factors, such as parental education, on the initiation of tobacco and marijuana use among youths from diverse backgrounds remain unclear. Recent studies indicate that the effects of socioeconomic factors on substance use and brain development are racialized, often showing weaker associations in racialized populations due to social stratification and racism. Our aim was to examine whether average cortical thickness mediates the racialized effects of parental education as a major socioeconomic determinant on the initiation of tobacco and marijuana use among youth. This longitudinal study, spanning 36 months, utilizes data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study, which included 10,777 pre-adolescents aged 9–10 years. From this, 8263 (76.67%) were White youth and 2514 (23.33%) were Black. Structural equation modeling was employed to assess the mediating role of average cortical thickness in the relationship between parental education (social determinant), race, and the initiation of tobacco and marijuana use, while considering covariates such as sex and age. Socioeconomic factors were predictive of future substance use. However, the association between these socioeconomic factors and substance use was found to be weaker among Black youths compared to White youths. Average cortical thickness partially mediated the influence of the racialized socioeconomic gradient on substance use, indicating both direct and indirect effects. Average cortical thickness acts as a partial mediator in the racialized impact of socioeconomic determinants on the initiation of adolescent substance use, underscoring the intricate relationship between neurodevelopmental and social factors in influencing substance use behaviors. This observation supports a biopsychosocial model that incorporates the effects of racism, aligning with the theory of minorities’ diminished returns.

Journal

Journal of Medicine, Surgery, and Public Health

Published

2024/08/01

Authors

Assari S, Sheikhattari P

Keywords

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.glmedi.2024.100107
Toggle Amygdala Volume and Depression Symptoms in Young Adolescents Who Use Cannabis. Behavioural brain research Wallace AL, Huestis MA, Sullivan RM, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Both cannabis use and depressive symptomology increase in prevalence throughout adolescence. Concurrently, the brain is undergoing neurodevelopment in important limbic regions, such as the amygdala. Prior research indicates the amygdala may also be related to cannabis use and depressive symptoms. We aimed to investigate the effects of adolescent cannabis use on amygdala volumes as well as the interaction of cannabis use and amygdala morphometry on depressive symptoms in youth.

Journal

Behavioural brain research

Published

2024/07/13

Authors

Wallace AL, Huestis MA, Sullivan RM, Wade NE

Keywords

Adolescents, Amygdala, Cannabis, Depression, Hair Toxicology

DOI

10.1016/j.bbr.2024.115150
Toggle How sex and gender shape functional brain networks. Science advances Matte Bon G, Kraft D, Kaufmann T 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Sex and gender differences exist in the prevalence and clinical manifestation of common brain disorders. Identifying their neural correlates may help improve clinical care.

Journal

Science advances

Published

2024/07/12

Authors

Matte Bon G, Kraft D, Kaufmann T

Keywords

DOI

10.1126/sciadv.adq3079
Toggle Functional brain networks are associated with both sex and gender in children. Science advances Dhamala E, Bassett DS, Yeo BT, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Sex and gender are associated with human behavior throughout the life span and across health and disease, but whether they are associated with similar or distinct neural phenotypes is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that, in children, sex and gender are uniquely reflected in the intrinsic functional connectivity of the brain. Somatomotor, visual, control, and limbic networks are preferentially associated with sex, while network correlates of gender are more distributed throughout the cortex. These results suggest that sex and gender are irreducible to one another not only in society but also in biology.

Journal

Science advances

Published

2024/07/12

Authors

Dhamala E, Bassett DS, Yeo BT, Holmes AJ

Keywords

DOI

10.1126/sciadv.adn4202
Toggle Heritability of functional gradients in the human subcortico-cortical connectivity. Communications biology Wu X, Zhang Y, Xue M, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

The human subcortex plays a pivotal role in cognition and is widely implicated in the pathophysiology of many psychiatric disorders. However, the heritability of functional gradients based on subcortico-cortical functional connectivity remains elusive. Here, leveraging twin functional MRI (fMRI) data from both the Human Connectome Project (n = 1023) and the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study (n = 936) datasets, we construct large-scale subcortical functional gradients and delineate an increased principal functional gradient pattern from unimodal sensory/motor networks to transmodal association networks. We observed that this principal functional gradient is heritable, and the strength of heritability exhibits a heterogeneous pattern along a hierarchical unimodal-transmodal axis in subcortex for both young adults and children. Furthermore, employing a machine learning framework, we show that this heterogeneous pattern of the principal functional gradient in subcortex can accurately discern the relationship between monozygotic twin pairs and dizygotic twin pairs with an accuracy of 76.2% (P < 0.001). The heritability of functional gradients is associated with the anatomical myelin proxied by MRI-derived T1-weighted/T2-weighted (T1w/T2w) ratio mapping in subcortex. This study provides new insights into the biological basis of subcortical functional hierarchy by revealing the structural and genetic properties of the subcortical functional gradients.

Journal

Communications biology

Published

2024/07/12

Authors

Wu X, Zhang Y, Xue M, Li J, Li X, Cui Z, Gao JH, Yang G

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s42003-024-06551-5
Toggle Associations between positive childhood experiences (PCEs), discrimination, and internalizing/externalizing in pre-adolescents. Academic pediatrics Choi KR, Bravo L, La Charite J, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the relationships between four types of perceived discrimination (based on race/ethnicity, nationality/country of origin, gender identity, weight/body size), individually and cumulatively; positive childhood experiences (PCEs); and behavioral symptoms among pre-adolescent youth.

Journal

Academic pediatrics

Published

2024/07/12

Authors

Choi KR, Bravo L, La Charite J, Cardona E, Elliott T, James KF, Wisk LE, Dunn EC, Saadi A

Keywords

Positive childhood experiences, child behavior, discrimination, pre-adolescence

DOI

10.1016/j.acap.2024.07.006
Toggle Sexual and Gender Minority Sleep Health Disparities and Minority Stress in Early Adolescence. The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine Leonard SI, Liu J, Jackman KB, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Sleep is essential to adolescent development. Sexual and gender minority (SGM; e.g., lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) adults are at high risk for poor sleep, partially due to minority stress (e.g., discrimination). However, sleep has rarely been studied among SGM adolescents. In a national sample of early adolescents, we analyzed sexual minority (SM) and gender minority (GM) identity, gender incongruence, and gender nonconformity in association with sleep and tested minority and general stressors as mediators.

Journal

The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine

Published

2024/07/09

Authors

Leonard SI, Liu J, Jackman KB, Bruzzese JM

Keywords

Early adolescence, Health status disparities, Mediation analysis, Minority stress, Perceived discrimination, Sexual and gender minorities, Sleep

DOI

10.1016/j.jadohealth.2024.05.022
Toggle Childhood obesity's impact on cognition and brain connectivity worsens with low family income. JCI insight Tomasi D, Volkow ND 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Childhood obesity and its adverse health consequences have risen worldwide, with low socioeconomic status increasing the risk in high-income countries like the US. Understanding the interplay between childhood obesity, cognition, socioeconomic factors, and the brain is crucial for prevention and treatment. Using data from the ABCD study, we investigated how body mass index (BMI) relates to brain structural and functional connectivity metrics. Obese/overweight children (n = 2,356) were more likely to live in poverty and exhibited lower cognitive performance compared to normal weight children (n = 4,754). Higher BMI was associated with multiple brain measures that were strongest for lower longitudinal diffusivity in corpus callosum, increased activity in cerebellum, insula, and somatomotor cortex, and decreased functional connectivity in multimodal brain areas, with effects more pronounced among children from low-income families. Notably, nearly 80% of the association of low income and 70% of the association of impaired cognition on BMI were mediated by higher brain activity in somatomotor areas. Increased resting activity in somatomotor areas and decreased structural and functional connectivity likely contribute to the higher risk of overweight/obesity among children from low-income families. Supporting low-income families and implementing educational interventions to improve cognition may promote healthy brain function and reduce the risk of obesity.

Journal

JCI insight

Published

2024/07/09

Authors

Tomasi D, Volkow ND

Keywords

Development, Neuroscience, Obesity

DOI

10.1172/jci.insight.181690
Toggle Prenatal cannabis exposure, the brain, and psychopathology during early adolescence Nature Mental Health Baranger DAA, Miller AP, Gorelik AJ, et al. 2024
Link to Publication

Abstract

Prenatal cannabis exposure (PCE) is associated with mental health problems in early adolescence, but the possible neurobiological mechanisms remain unknown. In a large longitudinal sample of adolescents (ages 9–12 years, n = 9,322–10,186), we find that PCE is associated with localized differences in gray and white matter of the frontal and parietal cortices, their associated white matter tracts, and striatal resting-state connectivity, even after accounting for potential pregnancy, familial, and child confounds. Variability in forceps minor and pars triangularis diffusion metrics partially longitudinally mediate associations of PCE with attention problems and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms. PCE-related differences in brain development may confer vulnerability to worse mental health in early adolescence.

Journal

Nature Mental Health

Published

2024/07/04

Authors

Baranger DAA, Miller AP, Gorelik AJ, Paul SE, Hatoum AS, Johnson EC, Colbert SMC, Smyser CD, Rogers CE, Bijsterbosch JD, Agrawal A, Bogdan R

Keywords

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/s44220-024-00281-7
Toggle Independent and Interactive Impacts of Prenatal Exposure to Legal Substances and Childhood Trauma on Emotion Processing in Pre-adolescents: Preliminary Findings From the ABCD Study JAACAP Open Lepow L, Wagner A, Peri S, et al. 2024
Link to Publication

Abstract

Objective
This paper investigated the effects of prenatal drug exposure (PDE), childhood trauma (CT), and their interactions on the neurobiological markers for emotion processing.

Method
Here, in a non-clinical sample of pre-adolescents (nine to ten years old) from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study (N=6,146), we investigate the impact of PDE to commonly used substances (i.e., alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana), CT, and their interaction on emotion processing. From the Emotional N-back fMRI task data, we selected 26 regions of interests, previously implicated in emotion processing, and conducted separate linear mixed models (108 total) and accounted for available environmental risk factors.

Results
PDE was associated with reductions in response bias related to the processing of fearful compared to happy faces in widespread cortical regions (including the superior frontal and fusiform gyri and the inferior parietal lobule). Reduced response bias in the superior frontal gyrus emerged as a PDE-driven and was present regardless of CT status, but correlated with several items on the Child Behavior Checklist only in those children with both PDE and CT. The lower response bias of the left inferior parietal lobule, on the other hand, was observed only in children with both PDE and CT and correlated with internalizing and externalizing behaviors.

Conclusion
The study’s results support the diathesis-stress model and suggest that PDE may confer vulnerability to the effects of later CT through altered neurodevelopment. Children experiencing these “double hit” conditions may represent at-risk individuals who could benefit from early interventions to mitigate the onset of psychopathology. Because of limitations in the way PDE was reported in the ABCD study, including lack of severity measures and retrospective reporting, results are not sufficient for making recommendations or dictating policy for pregnant persons. Nevertheless, this study is a necessary first step in examining the interactive effects of prenatal and early-life exposures and many aspects of the sociodemographic and psychological environment.

Journal

JAACAP Open

Published

2024/07/04

Authors

Lepow L, Wagner A, Peri S, Adams F, Ramakrishnan SA, Alam MA, Shaik RB, Hubbard NA, Koenigsberg HW, Hurd Y, Tapert SF, Ivanov I, Parvaz MA

Keywords

prenatal drug exposure; childhood trauma; adolescents; emotion processing; ABCD Study

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaacop.2024.04.009
Toggle Flexible adaptation of task-positive brain networks predicts efficiency of evidence accumulation. Communications biology Weigard A, Angstadt M, Taxali A, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Efficiency of evidence accumulation (EEA), an individual’s ability to selectively gather goal-relevant information to make adaptive choices, is thought to be a key neurocomputational mechanism associated with cognitive functioning and transdiagnostic risk for psychopathology. However, the neural basis of individual differences in EEA is poorly understood, especially regarding the role of largescale brain network dynamics. We leverage data from 5198 participants from the Human Connectome Project and Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study to demonstrate a strong association between EEA and flexible adaptation to cognitive demand in the “task-positive” frontoparietal and dorsal attention networks. Notably, individuals with higher EEA displayed divergent task-positive network activation across n-back task conditions: higher activation under high cognitive demand (2-back) and lower activation under low demand (0-back). These findings suggest that brain networks’ flexible adaptation to cognitive demands is a key neural underpinning of EEA.

Journal

Communications biology

Published

2024/07/02

Authors

Weigard A, Angstadt M, Taxali A, Heathcote A, Heitzeg MM, Sripada C

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s42003-024-06506-w
Toggle Brain structure differences in pediatric obesity: cause or consequence? Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) Carnell S 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Journal

Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.)

Published

2024/07/01

Authors

Carnell S

Keywords

DOI

10.1002/oby.24098
Toggle Socioeconomic Disadvantage and Youth Mental Health During the COVID-19 Pandemic Lockdown. JAMA network open Adise S, West AE, Rezvan PH, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Adolescence is a period in which mental health problems emerge. Research suggests that the COVID-19 lockdown may have worsened emotional and behavioral health.

Journal

JAMA network open

Published

2024/07/01

Authors

Adise S, West AE, Rezvan PH, Marshall AT, Betts S, Kan E, Sowell ER

Keywords

DOI

10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2024.20466
Toggle Comparing the stability and reproducibility of brain-behavior relationships found using canonical correlation analysis and partial least squares within the ABCD sample. Network neuroscience (Cambridge, Mass.) Nakua H, Yu JC, Abdi H, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and partial least squares correlation (PLS) detect linear associations between two data matrices by computing latent variables (LVs) having maximal correlation (CCA) or covariance (PLS). This study compared the similarity and generalizability of CCA- and PLS-derived brain-behavior relationships. Data were accessed from the baseline Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) dataset ( > 9,000, 9-11 years). The brain matrix consisted of cortical thickness estimates from the Desikan-Killiany atlas. Two phenotypic scales were examined separately as the behavioral matrix; the Child Behavioral Checklist (CBCL) subscale scores and NIH Toolbox performance scores. Resampling methods were used to assess significance and generalizability of LVs. LV for the CBCL brain relationships was found to be significant, yet not consistently stable or reproducible, across CCA and PLS models (singular value: CCA = .13, PLS = .39, < .001). LV for the NIH brain relationships showed similar relationships between CCA and PLS and was found to be stable and reproducible (singular value: CCA = .21, PLS = .43, < .001). The current study suggests that stability and reproducibility of brain-behavior relationships identified by CCA and PLS are influenced by the statistical characteristics of the phenotypic measure used when applied to a large population-based pediatric sample.

Journal

Network neuroscience (Cambridge, Mass.)

Published

2024/07/01

Authors

Nakua H, Yu JC, Abdi H, Hawco C, Voineskos A, Hill S, Lai MC, Wheeler AL, McIntosh AR, Ameis SH

Keywords

Brain-behavior relationships, Cortical thickness, Multivariate modeling, Population-based samples

DOI

10.1162/netn_a_00363
Toggle Association of prenatal substance exposure and the development of the amygdala, hippocampus, and parahippocampus. Journal of osteopathic medicine Hartwell M, Bloom M, Elenwo C, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Prenatal substance exposure (PSE) can lead to various harmful outcomes for the developing fetus and is linked to many emotional, behavioral, and cognitive difficulties later in life. Therefore, examination of the relationship between the development of associated brain structures and PSE is important for the development of more specific or new preventative methods.

Journal

Journal of osteopathic medicine

Published

2024/06/26

Authors

Hartwell M, Bloom M, Elenwo C, Gooch T, Dunn K, Breslin F, Croff JM

Keywords

prenatal alcohol exposure, prenatal opioid exposure, prenatal substance exposure, prenatal tobacco exposure

DOI

10.1515/jom-2023-0277
Toggle Can gray matter loss in early adolescence be explained by white matter growth? Human Brain Mapping Chad JA, Lebel C 2024
Link to Publication

Abstract

A fundamental puzzle about brain development is why the volume of gray matter (GM) apparently declines as white matter (WM) grows when children enter adolescence. Since pruned synapses are too small to affect GM volume, a prevailing theory posits that an expanded distribution of myelin causes the inner edge of the GM to “whiten” while total brain volume remains steady, shifting the MRI-measured WM:GM boundary closer to the brain’s outer surface. This theory inherently predicts that GM volume loss is concurrent with WM volume growth across regions, within sexes and over time, although these predictions have yet to be explicitly tested. In this study, we test these predictions by mapping regional GM and WM volumetric changes in 2333 participants of the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study aged 9–14 years who each received three MRI scans 2 years apart. We show that average GM and WM volume changes follow distinct spatial, temporal, and sex-specific patterns, indicating that GM volume loss is not balanced by WM volume growth, although cortical GM thinning is weakly correlated with WM growth in some regions. We conclude that myelin is not the main source of measured GM volume loss, and we propose alternative candidates.

Journal

Human Brain Mapping

Published

2024/06/22

Authors

Chad JA, Lebel C

Keywords

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.26758
Toggle Quality over quantity: powering neuroimaging samples in psychiatry. Neuropsychopharmacology : official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology Makowski C, Nichols TE, Dale AM 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Neuroimaging has been widely adopted in psychiatric research, with hopes that these non-invasive methods will provide important clues to the underpinnings and prediction of various mental health symptoms and outcomes. However, the translational impact of neuroimaging has not yet reached its promise, despite the plethora of computational methods, tools, and datasets at our disposal. Some have lamented that too many psychiatric neuroimaging studies have been underpowered with respect to sample size. In this review, we encourage this discourse to shift from a focus on sheer increases in sample size to more thoughtful choices surrounding experimental study designs. We propose considerations at multiple decision points throughout the study design, data modeling and analysis process that may help researchers working in psychiatric neuroimaging boost power for their research questions of interest without necessarily increasing sample size. We also provide suggestions for leveraging multiple datasets to inform each other and strengthen our confidence in the generalization of findings to both population-level and clinical samples. Through a greater emphasis on improving the quality of brain-based and clinical measures rather than merely quantity, meaningful and potentially translational clinical associations with neuroimaging measures can be achieved with more modest sample sizes in psychiatry.

Journal

Neuropsychopharmacology : official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology

Published

2024/06/20

Authors

Makowski C, Nichols TE, Dale AM

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41386-024-01893-4
Toggle Population-level normative models reveal race- and socioeconomic-related variability in cortical thickness of threat neurocircuitry. Communications biology Harnett NG, Fani N, Rowland G, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

The inequitable distribution of economic resources and exposure to adversity between racial groups contributes to mental health disparities within the United States. Consideration of the potential neurodevelopmental consequences, however, has been limited particularly for neurocircuitry known to regulate the emotional response to threat. Characterizing the consequences of inequity on threat neurocircuitry is critical for robust and generalizable neurobiological models of psychiatric illness. Here we use data from the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development Study 4.0 release to investigate the contributions of individual and neighborhood-level economic resources and exposure to discrimination. We investigate the potential appearance of race-related differences using both standard methods and through population-level normative modeling. We show that, in a sample of white and Black adolescents, racial inequities in socioeconomic factors largely contribute to the appearance of race-related differences in cortical thickness of threat neurocircuitry. The race-related differences are preserved through the use of population-level models and such models also preserve associations between cortical thickness and specific socioeconomic factors. The present findings highlight that such socioeconomic inequities largely underlie race-related differences in brain morphology. The present findings provide important new insight for the generation of generalizable neurobiological models of psychiatric illness.

Journal

Communications biology

Published

2024/06/19

Authors

Harnett NG, Fani N, Rowland G, Kumar P, Rutherford S, Nickerson LD

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s42003-024-06436-7
Toggle Transparency and reproducibility in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study. Developmental cognitive neuroscience Lopez DA, Cardenas-Iniguez C, Subramaniam P, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Transparency can build trust in the scientific process, but scientific findings can be undermined by poor and obscure data use and reporting practices. The purpose of this work is to report how data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study has been used to date, and to provide practical recommendations on how to improve the transparency and reproducibility of findings.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2024/06/18

Authors

Lopez DA, Cardenas-Iniguez C, Subramaniam P, Adise S, Bottenhorn KL, Badilla P, Mukwekwerere E, Tally L, Ahanmisi O, Bedichek IL, Matera SD, Perez-Tamayo GM, Sissons N, Winters O, Harkness A, Nakiyingi E, Encizo J, Xiang Z, Wilson IG, Smith AN, Hill AR, Adames AK, Robertson E, Boughter JR, Lopez-Flores A, Skoler ER, Dorholt L, Nagel BJ, Huber RS

Keywords

Adolescent, Best practices, Cognitive, Neuroimaging, Reproducibility, Transparency

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2024.101408
Toggle Childhood adiposity underlies numerous adult brain traits commonly attributed to midlife obesity. Brain : a journal of neurology Chiesa ST, Rader L, Garfield V, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Obese adults are often reported to have smaller brain volumes than their non-obese peers. Whether this represents evidence of accelerations in obesity-driven atrophy or is instead a legacy of developmental differences established earlier in the lifespan remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate whether early-life differences in adiposity explain differences in numerous adult brain traits commonly attributed to mid-life obesity. We utilised a two-sample lifecourse Mendelian randomization study in 37,501 adults recruited to UK Biobank (UKB) imaging centers from 2014, with secondary analyses in 6,996 children assessed in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study (ABCD) recruited from 2018. Exposures were genetic variants for childhood (266 variants) and adult (470 variants) adiposity derived from a GWAS of 407,741 UKB participants. Primary outcomes were adult total brain volume; grey matter volume, thickness, and surface area; white matter volume and hyperintensities; and hippocampus, amygdala, and thalamus volumes at mean age 55 in UKB. Secondary outcomes were equivalent childhood measures collected at mean age 10 in ABCD. In UKB, individuals who were genetically-predicted to have had higher levels of adiposity in childhood were found to have multiple smaller adult brain volumes relative to intracranial volume (e.g. z-score difference in normalised brain volume per category increase in adiposity [95%CI] = -0.20 [-0.28, -0.12]; p = 4 × 10-6). These effect sizes remained essentially unchanged after accounting for birthweight or current adult obesity in multivariable models, whereas most observed adult effects attenuated towards null (e.g. adult z-score [95%CI] for total volume = 0.06 [-0.05,0.17]; p = 0.3). Observational analyses in ABCD showed a similar pattern of changes already present in those with a high BMI by age 10 (z-score [95%CI] = -0.10 [-0.13, -0.07]; p = 8 × 10-13), with follow-up genetic risk score analyses providing some evidence for a causal effect already at this early age. Sensitivity analyses revealed that many of these effects were likely due to the persistence of larger head sizes established in those who gained excess weight in childhood (childhood z-score [95%CI] for intracranial volume = 0.14 [0.05,0.23]; p = 0.002), rather than smaller brain sizes per se. Our data suggest that persistence of early-life developmental differences across the lifecourse may underlie numerous neuroimaging traits commonly attributed to obesity-related atrophy in later life.

Journal

Brain : a journal of neurology

Published

2024/06/18

Authors

Chiesa ST, Rader L, Garfield V, Foote I, Suri S, Davey Smith G, Hughes AD, Richardson TG

Keywords

adiposity, brain traits, lifecourse Mendelian randomization, neuroimaging, obesity

DOI

10.1093/brain/awae198
Toggle Alcohol sipping patterns, personality, and psychopathology in Children: Moderating effects of dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) activation. Alcohol, clinical & experimental research Ferariu A, Chang H, Taylor A, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Alcohol, the most consumed drug in the United States, is associated with various psychological disorders and abnormal personality traits. Despite extensive research on adolescent alcohol consumption, the impact of early alcohol sipping patterns on changes in personality and mental health over time remains unclear. There is also limited information on the latent trajectory of early alcohol sipping, beginning as young as 9-10 years old. The dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) is crucial for cognitive control and response inhibition. However, the role of the dACC remains unclear in the relationship between early alcohol sipping and mental health outcomes and personality traits over time.

Journal

Alcohol, clinical & experimental research

Published

2024/06/18

Authors

Ferariu A, Chang H, Taylor A, Zhang F

Keywords

dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, early alcohol sipping, latent trajectory, mental health, personality traits

DOI

10.1111/acer.15393
Toggle Physical Activity and Sedentary Time Among U.S. Adolescents Before and During COVID-19: Findings from a Large Cohort Study AJPM Focus Hunt ET, Brazendale K, Ferreira de Moraes AC, et al. 2024
Link to Publication

Abstract

Introduction
Evidence suggests that adolescents engage in less physical activity (PA) during the summer break. Less is known regarding PA during the summer months of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.

Methods
Utilizing data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study, we examined daily activity measured by Fitbit Charge 2 devices before and following the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic during school and summer months. Linear models estimated activity during pre-COVID-19 school, pre-COVID-19 summer, COVID-19 school, and COVID-19 summer.

Results
Participants (N=7,179, 11.96 years, 51% female, 51% White) accumulated 8,671.0 (95%CI 8,544.7, 8,797.3) steps, 32.5 (95%CI 30.8, 32.3) minutes of MVPA, and 507.2 (95%CI 504.2, 510.2) minutes of sedentary time. During COVID-19 school, adolescents accumulated fewer daily steps and minutes of MVPA -1,782.3 steps (95%CI -2,052.7, -1,511.8) and -6.2 minutes (95% CI -8.4, -4.0), respectively. Adolescents accumulated more minutes of daily sedentary time, 29.6 mins (95% CI 18.9, 40.3) during COVID-19 school months compared to the pre-COVID-19 school months. During pre-COVID-19 summer months, adolescents accumulated 1,255.1 (95% CI 745.3, 1,765.0) more daily steps compared to COVID-19 months. Boys accumulated more daily steps and MVPA 2,011.5 steps (95% CI 1,271.9, 2,751.0) and 7.9 mins (95%CI 1.4, 14.4), respectively during the summer before COVID-19 compared to summer during COVID-19. Both girls and boys accumulated more minutes of sedentary time during COVID-19 school months, 47.4 (95%CI 27.5, 67.3) and 51.2 (95% 22.8, 79.7) compared to COVID-19 summer months, respectively.

Conclusions
Societal restrictions during COVID-19 negatively impacted activity levels in the US, particularly during the summer months during COVID-19.

Journal

AJPM Focus

Published

2024/06/17

Authors

Hunt ET, Brazendale K, Ferreira de Moraes AC, Malkani R, Heredia NI, Pfledderer CD, Brown D, Hoelscher DM, Beets MW, Weaver RG

Keywords

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.focus.2024.100253
Toggle Significance of overvaluation of weight and shape in childhood binge-eating disorder: Results from a population-based study Mental Health Science Baron A, Smith KE, Mason TB 2024
Link to Publication

Abstract

Binge-eating disorder (BED) involves recurrent binge-eating episodes with significant distress and is associated with adverse psychological and social problems. Previous studies in adults have suggested that presence of overvaluation of shape and weight may be a clinically relevant subtype of BED. The purpose of this study was to examine if overvaluation represents an important subtype of BED in children. It was hypothesized that children with both BED and overvaluation will have a higher body mass index z-scores (BMI-z) and internalizing psychopathology and lower cognitive functioning scores. Participants included a diverse sample of children between the ages of 9 and 10 years old from the baseline wave of the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study. Caregivers completed the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia, the Child Behavior Checklist, and measures of demographics, and children completed neurocognitive tests and had their height and weight measured. The analytic sample included 7200 children. There were no interactions between BED status and overvaluation in relation to outcome variables. Yet, BED and overvaluation were independently associated with higher internalizing symptoms, higher BMI-z, and poorer cognitive functioning. Contrary to the expectations, results did not support significant interactions between BED status and overvaluation in children. However, the study highlights the independent clinical significance of BED and overvaluation with higher BMI-z, higher internalizing symptoms, and poorer cognitive functioning. Future studies are necessary to determine the developmental trajectories of BED and overvaluation into adolescence and adulthood.

Journal

Mental Health Science

Published

2024/06/16

Authors

Baron A, Smith KE, Mason TB

Keywords

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1002/mhs2.73
Toggle Pixels and perception: Mapping the association between digital media and psychotic-like experiences in adolescents. Comprehensive psychiatry Hein K, Zarate D, Burleigh T, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Psychotic-like experiences (PLEs) during adolescence can lead to psychotic disorders. Digital media usage has been suggested to link to PLEs, but research is limited on how different types of screen exposure may differentially relate to PLEs over time. This study aimed to examine longitudinal associations between screen usage patterns and PLEs in adolescents.

Journal

Comprehensive psychiatry

Published

2024/06/15

Authors

Hein K, Zarate D, Burleigh T, Stavropoulos V

Keywords

adolescents, digital media use, longitudinal network analysis, psychotic-like experiences

DOI

10.1016/j.comppsych.2024.152509
Toggle Breastfeeding duration and brain-body development in 9-10-year-olds: modulating effect of socioeconomic levels. Pediatric research Rajagopalan V, Hsu E, Luo S 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

To investigate relationships of breastfeeding duration with brain structure and adiposity markers in youth and how these relationships are modified by neighborhood socioeconomic environments (SEEs).

Journal

Pediatric research

Published

2024/06/15

Authors

Rajagopalan V, Hsu E, Luo S

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41390-024-03330-0
Toggle Individual differences in internalizing symptoms in late childhood: A variance decomposition into cortical thickness, genetic and environmental differences. Developmental science Tandberg AD, Dahl A, Norbom LB, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

The brain undergoes extensive development during late childhood and early adolescence. Cortical thinning is a prominent feature of this development, and some researchers have suggested that differences in cortical thickness may be related to internalizing symptoms, which typically increase during the same period. However, research has yielded inconclusive results. We utilized a new method that estimates the combined effect of individual differences in vertex-wise cortical thickness on internalizing symptoms. This approach allows for many small effects to be distributed across the cortex and avoids the necessity of correcting for multiple tests. Using a sample of 8763 children aged 8.9 to 11.1 from the ABCD study, we decomposed the total variation in caregiver-reported internalizing symptoms into differences in cortical thickness, additive genetics, and shared family environmental factors and unique environmental factors. Our results indicated that individual differences in cortical thickness accounted for less than 0.5% of the variation in internalizing symptoms. In contrast, the analysis revealed a substantial effect of additive genetics and family environmental factors on the different components of internalizing symptoms, ranging from 06% to 48% and from 0% to 34%, respectively. Overall, while this study found a minimal association between cortical thickness and internalizing symptoms, additive genetics, and familial environmental factors appear to be of importance for describing differences in internalizing symptoms in late childhood. RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS: We utilized a new method for modelling the total contribution of vertex-wise individual differences in cortical thickness to internalizing symptoms in late childhood. The total contribution of individual differences in cortical thickness accounted for <0.5% of the variance in internalizing symptoms. Additive genetics and shared family environmental variation accounted for 17% and 34% of the variance in internalizing symptoms, respectively. Our results suggest that cortical thickness is not an important indicator for internalizing symptoms in childhood, whereas genetic and environmental differences have a substantial impact.

Journal

Developmental science

Published

2024/06/14

Authors

Tandberg AD, Dahl A, Norbom LB, Westlye LT, Ystrom E, Tamnes CK, Eilertsen EM

Keywords

ABCD study, cortical thickness, family environment, genetics, internalizing symptoms

DOI

10.1111/desc.13537
Toggle Early Life Adversity Predicts Reduced Hippocampal Volume in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study. The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine Breslin FJ, Kerr KL, Ratliff EL, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Cross-sectional studies in adults have demonstrated associations between early life adversity (ELA) and reduced hippocampal volume, but the timing of these effects is not clear. The present study sought to examine whether ELA predicts changes in hippocampal volume over time in a large sample of early adolescents.

Journal

The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine

Published

2024/06/14

Authors

Breslin FJ, Kerr KL, Ratliff EL, Cohen ZP, Simmons WK, Morris AS, Croff JM

Keywords

ABCD, Adolescent, Adversity, Hippocampus, Neurodevelopment

DOI

10.1016/j.jadohealth.2024.04.003
Toggle Neurodevelopmental signature of a transcriptome-based polygenic risk score for depression. Psychiatry research Miles AE, Rashid SS, Dos Santos FC, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Disentangling the molecular underpinnings of major depressive disorder (MDD) is necessary for identifying new treatment and prevention targets. The functional impact of depression-related transcriptomic changes on the brain remains relatively unexplored. We recently developed a novel transcriptome-based polygenic risk score (tPRS) composed of genes transcriptionally altered in MDD. Here, we sought to investigate effects of tPRS on brain structure in a developmental cohort (Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study; n = 5124; 2387 female) at baseline (9-10 years) and 2-year follow-up (11-12 years). We tested associations between tPRS and Freesurfer-derived measures of cortical thickness, cortical surface area, and subcortical volume. Across the whole sample, higher tPRS was significantly associated with thicker left posterior cingulate cortex at both baseline and 2-year follow-up. In females only, tPRS was associated with lower right hippocampal volume at baseline and 2-year follow-up, and lower right pallidal volume at baseline. Furthermore, regional subcortical volume significantly mediated an indirect effect of tPRS on depressive symptoms in females at both timepoints. Conversely, tPRS did not have significant effects on cortical surface area. These findings suggest the existence of a sex-specific neurodevelopmental signature associated with shifts towards a more depression-like brain transcriptome, and highlight novel pathways of developmentally mediated MDD risk.

Journal

Psychiatry research

Published

2024/06/13

Authors

Miles AE, Rashid SS, Dos Santos FC, Clifford KP, Sibille E, Nikolova YS

Keywords

ABCD study, Cortical thickness, Depression, Development, MDD, Neuroimaging, Polygenic risk score, Subcortical volume, Surface area, Transcriptomics

DOI

10.1016/j.psychres.2024.116030
Toggle Unique versus shared neural correlates of externalizing psychopathology in late childhood. Journal of psychopathology and clinical science Perlstein S, Hawes SW, Byrd AL, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Childhood externalizing psychopathology is heterogeneous. Symptom variability in conduct disorder (CD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and callous-unemotional (CU) traits designate different subgroups of children with externalizing problems who have specific treatment needs. However, CD, ODD, ADHD, and CU traits are highly comorbid. Studies need to generate insights into shared versus unique risk mechanisms, including through the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In this study, we tested whether symptoms of CD, ODD, ADHD, and CU traits were best represented within a bifactor framework, simultaneously modeling shared (i.e., general externalizing problems) and unique (i.e., symptom-specific) variance, or through a four-correlated factor or second-order factor model. Participants ( = 11,878, age, = 9 years) were from the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development Study. We used questionnaire and functional magnetic resonance imaging data (emotional N-back task) from the baseline assessment. A bifactor model specifying a general externalizing and specific CD, ODD, ADHD, and CU traits factors demonstrated the best fit. The four-correlated and second-order factor models both fit the data well and were retained for analyses. Across models, reduced right amygdala activity to fearful faces was associated with more general externalizing problems and reduced dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activity to fearful faces was associated with higher CU traits. ADHD scores were related to greater right nucleus accumbens activation to fearful and happy faces. Results give insights into risk mechanisms underlying comorbidity and heterogeneity within externalizing psychopathology. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2024 APA, all rights reserved).

Journal

Journal of psychopathology and clinical science

Published

2024/06/13

Authors

Perlstein S, Hawes SW, Byrd AL, Barzilay R, Gur RE, Laird AR, Waller R

Keywords

DOI

10.1037/abn0000923
Toggle GPT-based Normative Models of Brain sMRI Correlate with Dimensional Psychopathology Imaging Neuroscience Mendes SL, Pinaya WHL, Pan PM, et al. 2024
Link to publication

Abstract

Generative Pre-trained Transformer (GPT) models have been widely used for language tasks with surprising results. Furthermore, neuroimaging studies using deep generative normative modeling show promise in detecting brain abnormalities from brain structural MRI (sMRI). Meanwhile, psychiatric disorders are typically diagnosed through clinical assessment, which is particularly challenging in children and adolescents who present early symptoms or are in the early stages of the disease. Brain biomarkers research may contribute to the complex task of disentangling typical neurodevelopment from emergent psychiatric disorders. Here, we investigate whether a GPT-based normative architecture can detect psychiatric symptoms and disorders from brain sMRI of youths. The studied datasets contain measures of dimensional psychopathology: Brazilian High-Risk Cohort Study (BHRCS, n=737) and Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD, n=11,031), and scores and diagnostic of psychiatric disorders: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD-200, n=922) and Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange II (ABIDE-II, n=580). We examined the associations of all brain regions with: the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) symptom groups, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) scores, and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) diagnosis. Results showed the whole-brain typicality likelihood as correlated with social problems (ABCD test set) and ASD diagnosis (ABIDE-II dataset). Analysis by brain regions linked different areas to several CBCL scales, ADHD scores, and ASD diagnostic. This is the first successful study assessing all dimensional groups of CBCL symptoms, from all brain regions, based exclusively on sMRI. The normative models based on GPT are promising to investigate the gap between the phenotypes of psychiatric conditions and their neurobiological substrates.

Journal

Imaging Neuroscience

Published

2024/06/10

Authors

Mendes SL, Pinaya WHL, Pan PM, Gadelha A, Belangero S, Jackowski AP, Rohde LA, Miguel EC, Sato JR

Keywords

children, brain structural MRI, GPT models, child behavior checklist, autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1162/imag_a_00204
Toggle Associations between perinatal risk and physical health in pre-adolescence in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study®: the unexpected relationship with sleep disruption. Pediatric research Adise S, Palmer CE, Sheth C, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

To investigate relationships among different physical health problems in a large, sociodemographically diverse sample of 9-to-10-year-old children and determine the extent to which perinatal health factors are associated with childhood physical health problems.

Journal

Pediatric research

Published

2024/06/08

Authors

Adise S, Palmer CE, Sheth C, Marshall AT, Baker FC, Brown SA, Chang L, Clark DB, Dagher RK, Diaz V, Haist F, Herting MM, Huber RS, LeBlanc K, Lee KC, Liang H, Linkersdörfer J, Lisdahl KM, Ma J, Neigh G, Patterson MW, Renshaw P, Rhee KE, Smith C, Tapert SF, Thompson WK, Uban KA, Yurgelun-Todd D, Sowell ER

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41390-024-03288-z
Toggle Neighborhood Opportunity and Obesity in Early Adolescence: Differential Associations by Sex. The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine Ertel KA, Okuzono SS, Beyer LN, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Though research indicates that certain aspects of adverse neighborhood conditions may influence weight development in childhood and adolescence, it is unknown if the Child Opportunity Index (COI), a composite measure of 29 indicators of neighborhood conditions, is associated with weight outcomes in adolescence. We hypothesized that lower COI would be associated with higher overweight and obesity in cross-sectional and longitudinal modeling in a national sample of 9 year olds and 10 year olds and that this association would be different by sex.

Journal

The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine

Published

2024/06/07

Authors

Ertel KA, Okuzono SS, Beyer LN, Pintro K, Cuevas AG, Slopen N

Keywords

Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study, Adolescent overweight and obesity, Child Opportunity Index (COI), Neighborhood, Sex differences

DOI

10.1016/j.jadohealth.2024.04.009
Toggle Long-term impact of digital media on brain development in children. Scientific reports Nivins S, Sauce B, Liebherr M, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Digital media (DM) takes an increasingly large part of children’s time, yet the long-term effect on brain development remains unclear. We investigated how individual effects of DM use (i.e., using social media, playing video games, or watching television/videos) on the development of the cortex (i.e., global cortical surface area), striatum, and cerebellum in children over 4 years, accounting for both socioeconomic status and genetic predisposition. We used a prospective, multicentre, longitudinal cohort of children from the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development Study, aged 9.9 years when entering the study, and who were followed for 4 years. Annually, children reported their DM usage through the Youth Screen Time Survey and underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging scans every 2 years. Quadratic-mixed effect modelling was used to investigate the relationship between individual DM usage and brain development. We found that individual DM usage did not alter the development of cortex or striatum volumes. However, high social media usage was associated with a statistically significant change in the developmental trajectory of cerebellum volumes, and the accumulated effect of high-vs-low social media users on cerebellum volumes over 4 years was only β = - 0.03, which was considered insignificant. Nevertheless, the developmental trend for heavy social media users was accelerated at later time points. This calls for further studies and longer follow-ups on the impact of social media on brain development.

Journal

Scientific reports

Published

2024/06/06

Authors

Nivins S, Sauce B, Liebherr M, Judd N, Klingberg T

Keywords

Brain, Children, MRI, Polygenic scores, Social media, Videogames

DOI

10.1038/s41598-024-63566-y
Toggle Associations between media parenting practices and early adolescent screen use. Pediatric research Nagata JM, Paul A, Yen F, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

To assess the prevalence of various media parenting practices and identify their associations with early adolescent screen time and problematic social media, video game, and mobile phone use.

Journal

Pediatric research

Published

2024/06/05

Authors

Nagata JM, Paul A, Yen F, Smith-Russack Z, Shao IY, Al-Shoaibi AAA, Ganson KT, Testa A, Kiss O, He J, Baker FC

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41390-024-03243-y
Toggle Sex-specific associations of adolescent motherhood with cognitive function, behavioral problems, and autistic-like traits in offspring and the mediating roles of family conflict and altered brain structure. BMC medicine Ren T, Zhang L, Liu Y, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Previous studies have linked adolescent motherhood to adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in offspring, yet the sex-specific effect and underlying mechanisms remain unclear.

Journal

BMC medicine

Published

2024/06/05

Authors

Ren T, Zhang L, Liu Y, Zhang Q, Sun Y, Zhou W, Huang L, Wang M, Pu Y, Huang R, Chen J, He H, Zhu T, Wang S, Chen W, Zhang Q, Du W, Luo Q, Li F

Keywords

Adolescent pregnancy, Brain structure, Family environment, Neurodevelopment, Sex difference

DOI

10.1186/s12916-024-03442-8
Toggle Examining the Most Important Risk Factors Predicting Persistent and Distressing Psychotic-like Experiences in Youth. Biological psychiatry. Cognitive neuroscience and neuroimaging Karcher NR, Sotiras A, Niendam TA, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Persistence and distress distinguish more clinically significant psychotic-like experiences (PLEs) from those that are less likely to be associated with impairment and/or need for care. Identifying risk factors that differentiate clinically relevant PLEs early in development is important for improving our understanding of the etiopathogenesis of these experiences. Machine learning analyses examined the most important baseline factors distinguishing persistent distressing PLEs.

Journal

Biological psychiatry. Cognitive neuroscience and neuroimaging

Published

2024/06/05

Authors

Karcher NR, Sotiras A, Niendam TA, Walker EF, Jackson JJ, Barch DM

Keywords

DOI

10.1016/j.bpsc.2024.05.009
Toggle Evidence for Environmental Risk Factors and Cumulative Stress Linking Racial/Ethnic Identity and Psychotic-Like Experiences in ABCD Study Data. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Petti E, Schiffman J, Oh H, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Previous work has found increased endorsement of psychotic-like experiences (PLEs) among marginalized racial and ethnic groups. According to social determinants frameworks, marginalized groups are at increased risk for exposure to socio-environmental risk factors, including systemic factors (e.g., poverty and poor housing conditions), and social stressors (e.g., discrimination). We examine the extent to which environmental risk factors and stress account for associations between racial/ethnic groups with PLEs.

Journal

Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

Published

2024/06/05

Authors

Petti E, Schiffman J, Oh H, Karcher NR

Keywords

environment, ethnicity, psychotic-like experiences, race, stress

DOI

10.1016/j.jaac.2024.04.017
Toggle Familial risk for depression moderates neural circuitry in healthy preadolescents to predict adolescent depression symptoms in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study. Developmental cognitive neuroscience Holt-Gosselin B, Keding TJ, Rodrigues K, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

There is an imminent need to identify neural markers during preadolescence that are linked to developing depression during adolescence, especially among youth at elevated familial risk. However, longitudinal studies remain scarce and exhibit mixed findings. Here we aimed to elucidate functional connectivity (FC) patterns among preadolescents that interact with familial depression risk to predict depression two years later.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2024/06/04

Authors

Holt-Gosselin B, Keding TJ, Rodrigues K, Rueter A, Hendrickson TJ, Perrone A, Byington N, Houghton A, Miranda-Dominguez O, Feczko E, Fair DA, Joormann J, Gee DG

Keywords

ABCD study, Depression, Familial risk for depression, Longitudinal study, Resting-state fMRI, Youth

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2024.101400
Toggle Leveraging the adolescent brain cognitive development study to improve behavioral prediction from neuroimaging in smaller replication samples. Cerebral cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991) Makowski C, Brown TT, Zhao W, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Neuroimaging is a popular method to map brain structural and functional patterns to complex human traits. Recently published observations cast doubt upon these prospects, particularly for prediction of cognitive traits from structural and resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We leverage baseline data from thousands of children in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive DevelopmentSM Study to inform the replication sample size required with univariate and multivariate methods across different imaging modalities to detect reproducible brain-behavior associations. We demonstrate that by applying multivariate methods to high-dimensional brain imaging data, we can capture lower dimensional patterns of structural and functional brain architecture that correlate robustly with cognitive phenotypes and are reproducible with only 41 individuals in the replication sample for working memory-related functional MRI, and ~ 100 subjects for structural and resting state MRI. Even with 100 random re-samplings of 100 subjects in discovery, prediction can be adequately powered with 66 subjects in replication for multivariate prediction of cognition with working memory task functional MRI. These results point to an important role for neuroimaging in translational neurodevelopmental research and showcase how findings in large samples can inform reproducible brain-behavior associations in small sample sizes that are at the heart of many research programs and grants.

Journal

Cerebral cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991)

Published

2024/06/04

Authors

Makowski C, Brown TT, Zhao W, Hagler DJ, Parekh P, Garavan H, Nichols TE, Jernigan TL, Dale AM

Keywords

brain-behavior associations, multivariate modeling, neurocognition, structural MRI, task functional MRI

DOI

10.1093/cercor/bhae223
Toggle Partitioning variance in cortical morphometry into genetic, environmental, and subject-specific components. Cerebral cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991) Smith DM, Parekh P, Kennedy J, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

The relative contributions of genetic variation and experience in shaping the morphology of the adolescent brain are not fully understood. Using longitudinal data from 11,665 subjects in the ABCD Study, we fit vertex-wise variance components including family effects, genetic effects, and subject-level effects using a computationally efficient framework. Variance in cortical thickness and surface area is largely attributable to genetic influence, whereas sulcal depth is primarily explained by subject-level effects. Our results identify areas with heterogeneous distributions of heritability estimates that have not been seen in previous work using data from cortical regions. We discuss the biological importance of subject-specific variance and its implications for environmental influences on cortical development and maturation.

Journal

Cerebral cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991)

Published

2024/06/04

Authors

Smith DM, Parekh P, Kennedy J, Loughnan R, Frei O, Nichols TE, Andreassen OA, Jernigan TL, Dale AM

Keywords

heritability, intra-class correlation, mixed effects models

DOI

10.1093/cercor/bhae234
Toggle Weight Indices, Cognition, and Mental Health From Childhood to Early Adolescence. JAMA pediatrics Li ZA, Ray MK, Gu Y, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Journal

JAMA pediatrics

Published

2024/06/03

Authors

Li ZA, Ray MK, Gu Y, Barch DM, Hershey T

Keywords

DOI

10.1001/jamapediatrics.2024.1379
Toggle Aspects of Area Deprivation Index in Relation to Hippocampal Volume Among Children. JAMA network open Ku BS, Aberizk K, Feurer C, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Area deprivation index (ADI) has been shown to be associated with reduced hippocampal volume (HV) among youths. The social environment may interact with the association between ADI and HV.

Journal

JAMA network open

Published

2024/06/03

Authors

Ku BS, Aberizk K, Feurer C, Yuan Q, Druss BG, Jeste DV, Walker EF

Keywords

DOI

10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2024.16484
Toggle Racial Discrimination and Risk for Internalizing and Externalizing Symptoms Among Black Youths. JAMA network open Oshri A, Reck AJ, Carter SE, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Racial discrimination is a psychosocial stressor associated with youths’ risk for psychiatric symptoms. Scarce data exist on the moderating role of amygdalar activation patterns among Black youths in the US.

Journal

JAMA network open

Published

2024/06/03

Authors

Oshri A, Reck AJ, Carter SE, Uddin LQ, Geier CF, Beach SRH, Brody GH, Kogan SM, Sweet LH

Keywords

DOI

10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2024.16491
Toggle Cardiovascular health profile is favorably associated with brain health and neurocognitive development in adolescents Mental Health and Physical Activity De Moraes ACF, Nascimento-Ferreira MV, Hunt EH, et al. 2024
Link to Publication

Abstract

Background and aims
Poor cardiovascular health has been linked to a higher risk of cognitive decline in adults, however this relation is not well established among adolescents. The purpose of this analysis was to test the associations of cardiovascular health behaviors (diet, physical activity, nicotine use, and sleep health) and health indicators (body mass index, blood lipids, blood glucose, blood pressure) with adolescents’ brain development and executive and cognitive function.

Methods
We included 978 individuals from the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study who completed the year 2 follow-up assessment. Analysis was limited to those with complete data on cardiovascular health behaviors and health indicators which were used to compute composite cardiovascular health scores. Outcomes included estimates of general cognitive ability, executive function, and learning/memory through the NIH Toolbox neurocognitive battery, and MRI-derived brain morphometry. Associations were estimated by multilevel linear regression models using random effects.

Results
The mean (SD) age was 11.9 (0.2) years, 44.9% were girls, and 53.4% were white race/ethnicity. Individuals with more favorable cardiovascular health behaviors showed higher executive cognitive function scores (β = 0.170; CI 95%, 0.076 to 0.265; p = .001). Overall cardiovascular health was associated with a higher measure of executive cognitive function (β = 0.209; CI 95%, 0.067 to 0.351; p = .002) and total whole brain cortical volume (β = 480.1; CI 95%, 4.7 to 955.6; p = .003).

Conclusion
Our findings reveal positive associations between adolescents’ cardiovascular health behaviors and overall cardiovascular health with cognitive and executive function and brain cortical volume. Although our study is cross-sectional, the findings from a representative group of early adolescents add to the existing evidence suggesting a relationship between cardiovascular and brain health.

Journal

Mental Health and Physical Activity

Published

2024/06/03

Authors

De Moraes ACF, Nascimento-Ferreira MV, Hunt EH, Knell G, Virostko J, Tapert SS, Kohl HW

Keywords

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mhpa.2024.100611
Toggle Using explainable machine learning and fitbit data to investigate predictors of adolescent obesity. Scientific reports Kiss O, Baker FC, Palovics R, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Sociodemographic and lifestyle factors (sleep, physical activity, and sedentary behavior) may predict obesity risk in early adolescence; a critical period during the life course. Analyzing data from 2971 participants (M = 11.94, SD = 0.64 years) wearing Fitbit Charge HR 2 devices in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study, glass box machine learning models identified obesity predictors from Fitbit-derived measures of sleep, cardiovascular fitness, and sociodemographic status. Key predictors of obesity include identifying as Non-White race, low household income, later bedtime, short sleep duration, variable sleep timing, low daily step counts, and high heart rates (AUC = 0.726). Findings highlight the importance of inadequate sleep, physical inactivity, and socioeconomic disparities, for obesity risk. Results also show the clinical applicability of wearables for continuous monitoring of sleep and cardiovascular fitness in adolescents. Identifying the tipping points in the predictors of obesity risk can inform interventions and treatment strategies to reduce obesity rates in adolescents.

Journal

Scientific reports

Published

2024/05/31

Authors

Kiss O, Baker FC, Palovics R, Dooley EE, Pettee Gabriel K, Nagata JM

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41598-024-60811-2
Toggle Prenatal and Childhood Air Pollution Exposure, Cellular Immune Biomarkers, and Brain Connectivity in Early Adolescents Brain, Behavior, & Immunity - Health Cotter DL, Morrel J, Sukumaran K, et al. 2024
Link to Publication

Abstract

Introduction
Ambient air pollution is a neurotoxicant with hypothesized immune-related mechanisms. Adolescent brain structural and functional connectivity may be especially vulnerable to ambient pollution due to the refinement of large-scale brain networks during this period, which vary by sex and have important implications for cognitive, behavioral, and emotional functioning. In the current study we explored associations between air pollutants, immune markers, and structural and functional connectivity in early adolescence by leveraging cross-sectional sex-stratified data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development℠ Study®.

Methods
Pollutant concentrations of fine particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, and ozone were assigned to each child’s primary residential address during the prenatal period and childhood (9-10 years-old) using an ensemble-based modeling approach. Data collected at 11-13 years-old included resting-state functional connectivity of the default mode, frontoparietal, and saliency networks and limbic regions of interest, intracellular directional and isotropic diffusion of available white matter tracts, and markers of cellular immune activation. Using partial least squares correlation, a multivariate data-driven method that identifies important variables within latent dimensions, we investigated associations between 1) pollutants and structural and functional connectivity, 2) pollutants and immune markers, and 3) immune markers and structural and functional connectivity, in each sex separately.

Results
Air pollution exposure was related to white matter intracellular directional and isotropic diffusion at ages 11-13 years, but the direction of associations varied by sex. There were no associations between pollutants and resting-state functional connectivity at ages 11-13 years. Childhood exposure to nitrogen dioxide was negatively correlated with white blood cell count in males. Immune biomarkers were positively correlated with white matter intracellular directional diffusion in females and both white matter intracellular directional and isotropic diffusion in males. Lastly, there was a reliable negative correlation between lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio and default mode network resting-state functional connectivity in females, as well as a compromised immune marker profile associated with lower resting-state functional connectivity between the salience network and the left hippocampus in males. In post-hoc exploratory analyses, we found that the PLSC identified white matter tracts and rsFC networks related to processing speed and cognitive control performance from the NIH Toolbox.

Conclusions
We identified novel links between childhood nitrogen dioxide and cellular immune activation in males, and brain network connectivity and immune markers in both sexes. Future research should explore the potentially mediating role of immune activity in how pollutants affect neurological outcomes as well as the potential consequences of immune related patterns of brain connectivity in service of improved brain health for all.

Journal

Brain, Behavior, & Immunity - Health

Published

2024/05/31

Authors

Cotter DL, Morrel J, Sukumaran K, Cardenas-Iniguez C, Schwartz J, Herting MM

Keywords

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbih.2024.100799
Toggle Particulate Matter Exposure and Default Mode Network Equilibrium during Early Adolescence. Brain connectivity Zundel CG, Ely S, Brokamp C, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Air pollution exposure has been associated with adverse cognitive and mental health outcomes in children, adolescents, and adults, although youth may be particularly susceptible given ongoing brain development. However, the neurodevelopmental mechanisms underlying the associations among air pollution, cognition, and mental health remain unclear. We examined the impact of particulate matter (PM2.5) on resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) of the default mode network (DMN) and three key attention networks: dorsal attention, ventral attention, and cingulo-opercular. Longitudinal changes in rsFC within/between networks were assessed from baseline (9-10 years) to the two-year follow-up (11-12 years) in 10,072 youth (M+SD=9.93+0.63 years; 49% female) from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD®) study. Annual ambient PM2.5 concentrations from the 2016 calendar year were estimated using hybrid ensemble spatiotemporal models. RsFC was estimated using functional neuroimaging. Linear mixed models were used to test associations between PM2.5 and change in rsFC over time while adjusting for relevant covariates (e.g., age, sex, race/ethnicity, parental education, family income) and other air pollutants (O3, NO2). A PM2.5 x time interaction was significant for within-network rsFC of the DMN such that higher PM2.5 concentrations were associated with a smaller increase in rsFC over time. Further, significant PM2.5 x time interactions were observed for between-network rsFC of the DMN and all three attention networks, with varied directionality. PM2.5 exposure was associated with alterations in the development and equilibrium of the DMN-a network implicated in self-referential processing-and anti-correlated attention networks, which may impact trajectories of cognitive and mental health symptoms across adolescence.

Journal

Brain connectivity

Published

2024/05/30

Authors

Zundel CG, Ely S, Brokamp C, Strawn JR, Jovanovic T, Ryan P, Marusak H

Keywords

Developmental biology, Psychiatry, Resting-state networks

DOI

10.1089/brain.2023.0072
Toggle Neural correlates of obesity across the lifespan. Communications biology Morys F, Tremblay C, Rahayel S, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Associations between brain and obesity are bidirectional: changes in brain structure and function underpin over-eating, while chronic adiposity leads to brain atrophy. Investigating brain-obesity interactions across the lifespan can help better understand these relationships. This study explores the interaction between obesity and cortical morphometry in children, young adults, adults, and older adults. We also investigate the genetic, neurochemical, and cognitive correlates of the brain-obesity associations. Our findings reveal a pattern of lower cortical thickness in fronto-temporal brain regions associated with obesity across all age cohorts and varying age-dependent patterns in the remaining brain regions. In adults and older adults, obesity correlates with neurochemical changes and expression of inflammatory and mitochondrial genes. In children and older adults, adiposity is associated with modifications in brain regions involved in emotional and attentional processes. Thus, obesity might originate from cognitive changes during early adolescence, leading to neurodegeneration in later life through mitochondrial and inflammatory mechanisms.

Journal

Communications biology

Published

2024/05/28

Authors

Morys F, Tremblay C, Rahayel S, Hansen JY, Dai A, Misic B, Dagher A

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s42003-024-06361-9
Toggle Influence of chronotype on pain incidence during early adolescence. Pain Li R, Groenewald C, Tham SW, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

During adolescence major shifts in sleep and circadian systems occur with a notable circadian phase delay. Yet, the circadian influence on pain during early adolescence is largely unknown. Using 2 years of data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study, we investigated the impact of chronotype on pain incidence, moderate-to-severe pain, and multiregion pain 1 year later in U.S. adolescents. Based on the Munich ChronoType Questionnaire, chronotype was calculated as the midpoint between sleep onset and offset on free days, corrected for sleep debt over the week. Adolescents reported pain presence over the past month, and if present, rated pain intensity (0-10 numerical rating scale; ≥ 4 defined as moderate-to-severe pain) and body site locations (Collaborative Health Outcomes Information Registry Body Map; ≥2 regions defined as multiregion pain). Three-level random intercept logistic regression models were specified for each pain outcome, adjusting for baseline sociodemographic and developmental characteristics. Among 5991 initially pain-free adolescents (mean age 12.0 years, SD 0.7), the mean chronotype was 3:59 am (SD 97 minutes), and the 1-year incidence of pain, moderate-to-severe pain, and multiregion pain was 24.4%, 15.2%, and 13.5%, respectively. Each hour later chronotype at baseline was associated with higher odds of developing any pain (odds ratio [OR] = 1.06, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01, 1.11), moderate-to-severe pain (OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.05-1.17), and multiregion pain (OR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.02-1.14) during 1-year follow-up. In this diverse U.S. adolescent sample, later chronotype predicted higher incidence of new-onset pain.

Journal

Pain

Published

2024/05/28

Authors

Li R, Groenewald C, Tham SW, Rabbitts JA, Ward TM, Palermo TM

Keywords

DOI

10.1097/j.pain.0000000000003271
Toggle Racial Differences in Biopsychosocial Pathways to Tobacco and Marijuana Use Among Youth. Journal of racial and ethnic health disparities Assari S 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

The influence of socioeconomic disparities and multidimensional stressors on youth tobacco and marijuana use is recognized; however, the extent of these effects varies among different racial groups. Understanding the racial differences in the factors influencing substance use is crucial for developing tailored interventions aimed at reducing disparities in tobacco and marijuana use among adolescents.

Journal

Journal of racial and ethnic health disparities

Published

2024/05/28

Authors

Assari S

Keywords

Adolescents, Ethnic groups, Marijuana, Socioeconomic status, Tobacco

DOI

10.1007/s40615-024-02035-8
Toggle A Comparison of Remote Versus in-Person Assessments of Substance Use and Related Constructs Among Adolescents. Substance use & misuse Wade NE, Patel H, Pelham WE 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Underreporting of adolescent substance use is a known issue, with format of assessment (in-person vs. remote) a potentially important factor. We investigate whether being assessed remotely (via phone or videoconference) versus in-person affects youth report of substance use patterns, attitudes, and access, hypothesizing remote visits would garner higher levels of substance use reporting and more positive substance use attitudes. We used the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development [ABCD] Study data between 2021-2022 during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants chose whether to complete assessments in-person (n=615; 49% female; mean=13.9; 57% White) or remotely (n=1,467; 49% female, mean=13.7; 49% White). Regressions predicted substance use patterns, attitudes, and access, by visit format, controlling for relevant sociodemographic factors. Effect sizes and standardized mean differences are presented. 17% of adolescent participants reported any level of substance use. Youth interviewed remotely reported more negative expectancies of alcohol and cannabis. In addition, those queried remotely were less likely to endorse use), sipping alcohol, eating cannabis), and reported less curiosity or intent to try alcohol, though these differences did not survive an adjustment for multiple testing. Effect sizes ranged from small to medium. Preliminary evidence suggests youth completing remote visits were more likely to disclose negative expectancies toward alcohol and cannabis. Effect sizes were modest, though 37 of 39 variables examined trended toward restricted reporting during remote sessions. Thus, format of substance use assessment should be controlled for, but balanced by other study needs (e.g., increasing accessibility of research to all sociodemographic groups).

Journal

Substance use & misuse

Published

2024/05/27

Authors

Wade NE, Patel H, Pelham WE

Keywords

Adolescents, alcohol, remote assessment, substance use, substance use assessment, substance use attitudes

DOI

10.1080/10826084.2024.2352108
Toggle Air pollution from biomass burning disrupts early adolescent cortical microarchitecture development. Environment international Bottenhorn KL, Sukumaran K, Cardenas-Iniguez C, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Exposure to outdoor particulate matter (PM) represents a ubiquitous threat to human health, and particularly the neurotoxic effects of PM from multiple sources may disrupt neurodevelopment. Studies addressing neurodevelopmental implications of PM exposure have been limited by small, geographically limited samples and largely focus either on macroscale cortical morphology or postmortem histological staining and total PM mass. Here, we leverage residentially assigned exposure to six, data-driven sources of PM and neuroimaging data from the longitudinal Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study (ABCD Study®), collected from 21 different recruitment sites across the United States. To contribute an interpretable and actionable assessment of the role of air pollution in the developing brain, we identified alterations in cortical microstructure development associated with exposure to specific sources of PM using multivariate, partial least squares analyses. Specifically, average annual exposure (i.e., at ages 8-10 years) to PM from biomass burning was related to differences in neurite development across the cortex between 9 and 13 years of age.

Journal

Environment international

Published

2024/05/27

Authors

Bottenhorn KL, Sukumaran K, Cardenas-Iniguez C, Habre R, Schwartz J, Chen JC, Herting MM

Keywords

Adolescence, Air pollution, Neurodevelopment, PM(2.5) sources, Restriction spectrum imaging

DOI

10.1016/j.envint.2024.108769
Toggle Interactive effects of participant and stimulus race on cognitive performance in youth: Insights from the ABCD study. Developmental cognitive neuroscience Rubien-Thomas E, Lin YC, Chan I, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

An extensive literature shows that race information can impact cognitive performance. Two key findings include an attentional bias to Black racial cues in U.S. samples and diminished recognition of other-race faces compared to same-race faces in predominantly White adult samples. Yet face stimuli are increasingly used in psychological research often unrelated to race (Conley et al., 2018) or without consideration for how race information may influence cognitive performance, especially among developmental participants from different racial groups. In the current study we used open-access data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study® 4.0.1 release to test for developmentally similar other- and same-race effects of Black and White face stimuli on attention, working memory, and recognition memory in 9- and 10-year-old Black and White children (n=5,659) living in the U.S. Black and White children showed better performance when attending to Black versus White faces. We also show an advantage in recognition memory of same-race compared to other-race faces in White children that did not generalize to Black children. Together the findings highlight how race information, even when irrelevant to an experiment, may indirectly lead to misinterpretation of group differences in cognitive performance in children of different racial backgrounds.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2024/05/24

Authors

Rubien-Thomas E, Lin YC, Chan I, Conley MI, Skalaban L, Kopp H, Adake A, Richeson JA, Gee DG, Baskin-Sommers A, Casey BJ

Keywords

Attention, Children, Cognition, Memory, Racial bias

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2024.101393
Toggle Unraveling Multimodal Brain Signatures: Deciphering Transdiagnostic Dimensions of Psychopathology in Adolescents Advanced Intelligent Systems Xia J, Chen N, Qiu A 2024
Link to Publication

Abstract

Adolescent psychiatric disorders arise from intricate interactions of clinical histories and disruptions in brain development. While connections between psychopathology and brain functional connectivity are studied, the use of deep learning to elucidate overlapping neural mechanisms through multimodal brain images remains nascent. Utilizing two adolescent datasets—the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort (PNC, n = 1100) and the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD, n = 7536)—this study employs interpretable neural networks and demonstrates that incorporating brain morphology, along with functional and structural networks, augments traditional clinical characteristics (age, gender, race, parental education, medical history, and trauma exposure). Predictive accuracy reaches 0.37–0.464 between real and predicted general psychopathology and four psychopathology dimensions (externalizing, psychosis, anxiety, and fear). The brain morphology and connectivities within the frontoparietal, default mode network, and visual associate networks are recurrent across general psychopathology and four psychopathology dimensions. Unique structural and functional pathways originating from the cerebellum, amygdala, and visual-sensorimotor cortex are linked with these individual dimensions. Consistent findings across both PNC and ABCD affirm the generalizability. The results underscore the potential of diverse sensory inputs in steering executive processes tied to psychopathology dimensions in adolescents, hinting at neural avenues for targeted therapeutic interventions and preventive strategies.

Journal

Advanced Intelligent Systems

Published

2024/05/23

Authors

Xia J, Chen N, Qiu A

Keywords

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1002/aisy.202300577
Toggle Parental Legal System Involvement, Positive Childhood Experiences, and Suicide Risk. Pediatrics Bravo LG, Meza J, Schiff SJ, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

To examine whether adverse parental legal system involvement (incarceration, arrest) was associated with suicide risk, accounting for other adverse childhood experiences, and whether there was a moderating relationship between positive childhood experiences (PCEs) and parental legal system involvement in suicide risk.

Journal

Pediatrics

Published

2024/05/23

Authors

Bravo LG, Meza J, Schiff SJ, Ahmed C, Elliot T, La Charite J, Choi K

Keywords

DOI

10.1542/peds.2023-062566
Toggle Measurement invariance of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) across race/ethnicity and sex in the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development (ABCD) study. Psychological assessment Stewart LC, Asadi S, Rodriguez-Seijas C, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

There are numerous studies examining differences in the experience of disorders and symptoms of psychopathology in adolescents across racial or ethnic groups and sex. Though there is substantial research exploring potential factors that may influence these differences, few studies have considered the potential contribution of measurement properties to these differences. Therefore, this study examined whether there are differences across racial or ethnic groups and sex in the measurement of psychopathology, assessed in mother-reported behavior of 9-11 year old youth from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study sample using updated Child Behavior Checklist scales (CBCL; Achenbach & Rescorla, 2001). Tests of measurement invariance of the CBCL utilized the higher order factor structure identified by Michelini et al. (2019) using this same Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development cohort. The dimensions include internalizing, somatoform, detachment, externalizing, and neurodevelopmental problems. The configural model had a good-to-excellent fit on all subscales of the CBCL across racial or ethnic groups and sex. The metric and scalar models fit just as well as the configural models, indicating that the scales are measuring the same constructs across racial or ethnic groups and sex and are not influenced by measurement properties of items on the CBCL, although some high-severity response options were not endorsed for youth in all racial or ethnic groups. These findings support the use of the CBCL in research examining psychopathology in racially or ethnically diverse samples of youth. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2024 APA, all rights reserved).

Journal

Psychological assessment

Published

2024/05/23

Authors

Stewart LC, Asadi S, Rodriguez-Seijas C, Wilson S, Michelini G, Kotov R, Cicero DC, Olino TM

Keywords

DOI

10.1037/pas0001319
Toggle Social epidemiology of online dating in U.S. early adolescents. BMC research notes Nagata JM, Balasubramanian P, Shim JE, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

To investigate the prevalence and sociodemographic associations of online dating in a demographically diverse U.S. national cohort of early adolescents.

Journal

BMC research notes

Published

2024/05/22

Authors

Nagata JM, Balasubramanian P, Shim JE, Talebloo J, Yen F, Al-Shoaibi AAA, Shao IY, Ganson KT, Testa A, Kiss O, Baker FC

Keywords

Adolescent, Dating, LGBTQ+, Online dating, Relationships, Social epidemiology

DOI

10.1186/s13104-024-06777-w
Toggle Greater social jetlag predicts poorer NIH Toolbox crystallized cognitive and academic performance in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study. Chronobiology international Li AR, Thomas ML, Gonzalez MR, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Academic performance plays a crucial role in long-term educational attainment and occupational function. Chronotype refers to an individual’s daily tendencies for times for waking, activity, and sleep. Social jetlag reflects the mismatch between an individual’s chronotype and their social schedule. Because school typically starts early in the morning, later chronotype is often associated with daytime sleepiness, insufficient sleep, and poor academic performance. However, the relationship between academic performance, chronotype, and social jetlag has not been extensively examined in large samples like the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study. We hypothesized that greater social jetlag would predict poorer cognitive and academic performance. Year 2 (ages 11-14) cross-sectional data from the ABCD cohort ( = 6,890 adolescents) were used to evaluate academic performance (i.e. self-reported past year grades), NIH Toolbox cognitive performance measures, chronotype, and social jetlag from the Munich Chronotype Questionnaire. We found that later chronotype and greater social jetlag predicted poorer cognitive and academic performance with small effect sizes. Our findings emphasize the importance of individual differences in chronotype and social jetlag when designing class schedules, as aligning school activities with student optimal sleep-wake times may contribute to improved academic performance.

Journal

Chronobiology international

Published

2024/05/21

Authors

Li AR, Thomas ML, Gonzalez MR, McCarthy MJ, Hasler BP, Tapert SF, Meruelo AD

Keywords

ABCD, Chronotype, academic performance, adolescence, cognitive performance, social jetlag

DOI

10.1080/07420528.2024.2353848
Toggle Association of physical activity and screen time with cardiovascular disease risk in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study. BMC public health Nagata JM, Weinstein S, Alsamman S, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

According to the Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee Scientific Report, limited evidence is available on sedentary behaviors (screen time) and their joint associations with physical activity (steps) for cardiovascular health in adolescence. The objective of this study was to identify joint associations of screen time and physical activity categories with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors (blood pressure, hemoglobin A1c, cholesterol) in adolescence.

Journal

BMC public health

Published

2024/05/18

Authors

Nagata JM, Weinstein S, Alsamman S, Lee CM, Dooley EE, Ganson KT, Testa A, Gooding HC, Kiss O, Baker FC, Pettee Gabriel K

Keywords

Adolescent, Blood pressure, Cardiovascular disease, Cholesterol, Diabetes, Digital media, Dyslipidemia, Hemoglobin A1c, Hypertension, Physical activity, Screen use

DOI

10.1186/s12889-024-18790-6
Toggle Cross-continental environmental and genome-wide association study on children and adolescent anxiety and depression. Frontiers in psychiatry Thapaliya B, Ray B, Farahdel B, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Anxiety and depression in children and adolescents warrant special attention as a public health concern given their devastating and long-term effects on development and mental health. Multiple factors, ranging from genetic vulnerabilities to environmental stressors, influence the risk for the disorders. This study aimed to understand how environmental factors and genomics affect children and adolescents anxiety and depression across three cohorts: Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development Study (US, age of 9-10; N=11,875), Consortium on Vulnerability to Externalizing Disorders and Addictions (INDIA, age of 6-17; N=4,326) and IMAGEN (EUROPE, age of 14; N=1888). We performed data harmonization and identified the environmental impact on anxiety/depression using a linear mixed-effect model, recursive feature elimination regression, and the LASSO regression model. Subsequently, genome-wide association analyses with consideration of significant environmental factors were performed for all three cohorts by mega-analysis and meta-analysis, followed by functional annotations. The results showed that multiple environmental factors contributed to the risk of anxiety and depression during development, where early life stress and school support index had the most significant and consistent impact across all three cohorts. In both meta, and mega-analysis, SNP rs79878474 in chr11p15 emerged as a particularly promising candidate associated with anxiety and depression, despite not reaching genomic significance. Gene set analysis on the common genes mapped from top promising SNPs of both meta and mega analyses found significant enrichment in regions of chr11p15 and chr3q26, in the function of potassium channels and insulin secretion, in particular Kv3, Kir-6.2, SUR potassium channels encoded by the KCNC1, KCNJ11, and ABCCC8 genes respectively, in chr11p15. Tissue enrichment analysis showed significant enrichment in the small intestine, and a trend of enrichment in the cerebellum. Our findings provide evidences of consistent environmental impact from early life stress and school support index on anxiety and depression during development and also highlight the genetic association between mutations in potassium channels, which support the stress-depression connection via hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, along with the potential modulating role of potassium channels.

Journal

Frontiers in psychiatry

Published

2024/05/17

Authors

Thapaliya B, Ray B, Farahdel B, Suresh P, Sapkota R, Holla B, Mahadevan J, Chen J, Vaidya N, Perrone-Bizzozero NI, Benegal V, Schumann G, Calhoun VD, Liu J

Keywords

GWAS, anxiety, depression, mega-analysis, meta-analysis, regression

DOI

10.3389/fpsyt.2024.1384298
Toggle Association of body mass index with progression from binge-eating behavior into binge-eating disorder among adolescents in the United States: a prospective analysis of pooled data. Appetite Al-Shoaibi AAA, Lavender JM, Kim SJ, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

The association between body mass index (BMI) and binge-eating disorder (BED) is well-established. However, data on the extent to which BMI is associated with progression from binge-eating behavior into BED among adolescents are limited, which was the aim of this investigation. Participants were 9,964 U.S. adolescents from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study, aged 9-13 at the time of study enrollment. A computerized parent-reported assessment was used to establish adolescents’ binge-eating behaviors and BED. Cox proportional hazards models adjusting for sociodemographic covariates were used to examine prospective associations between BMI and likelihood of BED onset among a) adolescents with binge-eating behavior, and b) adolescents with no binge-eating behavior. Of 975 adolescents who met study criteria for binge-eating behavior, 89 (9.1%) subsequently met study criteria for BED. Of 8,989 adolescents with no binge-eating behavior, 82 (0.9%) subsequently met study criteria for BED. BMI percentile was significantly associated with the likelihood of BED onset in participants with [ adjusted HR =1.03 (1.00, 1.06)] and participants without [adjusted HR =1.05 (1.03, 1.07)] binge-eating behavior. Results were also significant when examining BMI as a dichotomous predictor (above and below 85 percentile) among those with [adjusted HR =2.60 (1.00, 6.68) and those without [adjusted HR =6.01 (3.90, 11.10)] binge-eating behavior. Overall, results indicate that elevated BMI is prospectively associated with a greater risk for BED onset among U.S. adolescents with or without binge-eating behavior. Adolescents with a higher BMI may benefit from screening for binge eating, and prevention/early intervention strategies to mitigate the risk for developing BED.

Journal

Appetite

Published

2024/05/15

Authors

Al-Shoaibi AAA, Lavender JM, Kim SJ, Shao IY, Ganson KT, Testa A, He J, Glidden DV, Baker FC, Nagata JM

Keywords

adolescent, binge eating, body mass index, eating disorders, weight, youth

DOI

10.1016/j.appet.2024.107419
Toggle Genetic Architectures of Adolescent Depression Trajectories in 2 Longitudinal Population Cohorts. JAMA psychiatry Grimes PZ, Adams MJ, Thng G, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Adolescent depression is characterized by diverse symptom trajectories over time and has a strong genetic influence. Research has determined genetic overlap between depression and other psychiatric conditions; investigating the shared genetic architecture of heterogeneous depression trajectories is crucial for understanding disease etiology, prediction, and early intervention.

Journal

JAMA psychiatry

Published

2024/05/15

Authors

Grimes PZ, Adams MJ, Thng G, Edmonson-Stait AJ, Lu Y, McIntosh A, Cullen B, Larsson H, Whalley HC, Kwong ASF

Keywords

DOI

10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2024.0983
Toggle Developmental changes in the endorsement of psychotic-like experiences from middle childhood through young adulthood. Journal of psychiatric research Capizzi R, Korenic SA, Klugman J, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Children tend to endorse psychotic-like experiences (PLEs) at higher rates than adults, although little is known about how specific symptom endorsement changes across the span of development. Here we take an observational approach to examine trends in PLE endorsement by age in two non-clinical samples: one of school-aged children and another of late adolescents and early adults.

Journal

Journal of psychiatric research

Published

2024/05/14

Authors

Capizzi R, Korenic SA, Klugman J, Damme KSF, Vargas T, Mittal VA, Schiffman J, Ellman LM

Keywords

Adolescent brain and cognitive development study, Age, Clinical high risk for psychosis, Epidemiology, Prodromal questionnaire, Risk prediction

DOI

10.1016/j.jpsychires.2024.05.034
Toggle Social determinants of antidepressant continuation during pregnancy in the USA: findings from the ABCD cohort study. Archives of women's mental health Dupuis M, Weir KR, Vidonscky Lüthold R, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Patients and healthcare professionals overestimate the risks of using antidepressants during pregnancy. According to current literature, approximately half of people stop taking an anti-depressant medication when they become pregnant. Discontinuing antidepressants during pregnancy increases risks of postnatal relapses. Factors like socioeconomic status, education, and planned pregnancies play a role in the decision to continue antidepressant medication, which can worsen disparities in maternal and child health. Our aim was to identify the sociodemographic factors associated with antidepressant continuation after awareness of pregnancy.

Journal

Archives of women's mental health

Published

2024/05/14

Authors

Dupuis M, Weir KR, Vidonscky Lüthold R, Panchaud A, Baggio S

Keywords

Antidepressants, Continuation, Discontinuation, Pregnancy, Social determinants

DOI

10.1007/s00737-024-01470-0
Toggle Exposomic and polygenic contributions to allostatic load in early adolescence Nature Mental Health Hoffman KW, Tran KT, Moore TM, et al. 2024
Link to Publication

Abstract

Allostatic load (AL) is the cumulative ‘wear and tear’ on the body due to chronic adversity. We tested the poly-environmental (exposomic) and polygenic contributions to AL and their combined contribution to adolescent mental health. In this cohort study of N = 5,036 diverse youth (mean age 12 years) from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study, we calculated a latent AL score, childhood exposomic risk and genetic risk. We tested the associations of exposomic and polygenic risks with AL using linear mixed-effects models, and tested the mediating role of AL on the pathway from exposomic/polygenic risk to mental health. AL was significantly lower among non-Hispanic white youth compared to Hispanic and non-Hispanic black youth. Childhood exposomic burden was associated with AL in adolescence (β = 0.25, 95% CI 0.22–0.29, P < 0.001). In subset analysis of participants of European-like genetic ancestry (n = 2,928), the type 2 diabetes polygenic risk score (T2D-PRS; β = 0.11, 95% CI 0.07–0.14, P < 0.001) and major depressive disorder (MDD)-PRS (β = 0.05, 95% CI 0.02–0.09, P = 0.003) were associated with AL. Both PRSs showed significant gene–environment interactions such that, with greater polygenic risk, associations between exposome and AL were stronger. AL significantly mediated the indirect path from exposomic risk at age 11 years, and from both MDD-PRS and T2D-PRS to psychopathology at age 12 years. Our findings show that AL can be quantified in youth and is associated with exposomic and polygenic burden, supporting the diathesis–stress model.

Journal

Nature Mental Health

Published

2024/05/14

Authors

Hoffman KW, Tran KT, Moore TM, Gataviņš MM, Visoki E, Kwon O, DiDomenico GE, Chaiyachati BH, Schultz LM, Almasy L, Hayes MR, Daskalakis NP, Barzilay R

Keywords

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/s44220-024-00255-9
Toggle Emotion dysregulation and right pars orbitalis constitute a neuropsychological pathway to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder Nature Mental Health Hou W, Sahakian BJ, Langley C, et al. 2024
Link to Publication

Abstract

Emotion dysregulation is common in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), which is known to be clinically heterogeneous. However, it remains unclear whether emotion dysregulation represents a neuropsychological pathway to ADHD. Here, using a large population-based cohort (n = 6,053), we show that emotion dysregulation was associated with ADHD symptoms (partial eta2 = 0.21) and this persisted after controlling for the cognitive and motivational deficits. Emotion dysregulation mediated the association between smaller surface area of the right pars orbitalis and greater ADHD symptoms at 1-year follow-up, indicating an emotion pathway for ADHD. This pathway was associated with immune responses by both transcriptomic analyses and white blood cell markers. In an independent clinical sample for ADHD (n = 672), the emotion pathway improved the case/control classification accuracy. These findings suggest that emotion dysregulation is a core symptom and route to ADHD, which may not respond to the current pharmacological treatments for ADHD.

Journal

Nature Mental Health

Published

2024/05/13

Authors

Hou W, Sahakian BJ, Langley C, Yang Y, Bethlehem RAI, Luo Q

Keywords

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/s44220-024-00251-z
Toggle Associations between behavioral and self-reported impulsivity, brain structure, and genetic influences in middle childhood. Developmental cognitive neuroscience Gilman JM, Kaur J, Tervo-Clemmens B, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Impulsivity undergoes a normative developmental trajectory from childhood to adulthood and is thought to be driven by maturation of brain structure. However, few large-scale studies have assessed associations between impulsivity, brain structure, and genetic susceptibility in children. In 9112 children ages 9-10 from the ABCD study, we explored relationships among impulsivity (UPPS-P impulsive behavior scale; delay discounting), brain structure (cortical thickness (CT), cortical volume (CV), and cortical area (CA)), and polygenic scores for externalizing behavior (PGS). Both higher UPPS-P total scores and more severe delay-discounting had widespread, low-magnitude associations with smaller CA in frontal and temporal regions. No associations were seen between impulsivity and CV or CT. Additionally, higher PGS was associated with both higher UPPS-P scores and with smaller CA and CV in frontal and temporal regions, but in non-overlapping cortical regions, underscoring the complex interplay between genetics and brain structure in influencing impulsivity. These findings indicate that, within large-scale population data, CA is significantly yet weakly associated with each of these impulsivity measures and with polygenic risk for externalizing behaviors, but in distinct brain regions. Future work should longitudinally assess these associations through adolescence, and examine associated functional outcomes, such as future substance use and psychopathology.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2024/05/11

Authors

Gilman JM, Kaur J, Tervo-Clemmens B, Potter K, Sanzo BT, Schuster RM, Bjork JM, Evins AE, Roffman JL, Lee PH

Keywords

Brain structure, Childhood, Cortical area, Cortical volume, Genetic predictors, Impulsivity

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2024.101389
Toggle Parental warmth buffers the negative impact of weaker fronto-striatal connectivity on early adolescents' academic achievement. Journal of research on adolescence : the official journal of the Society for Research on Adolescence Yang B, Zhou Z, Chen YY, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

In past decades, the positive role of self-control in students’ academic success has attracted plenty of scholarly attention. However, fewer studies have examined the link between adolescents’ neural development of the inhibitory control system and their academic achievement, especially using a longitudinal approach. Moreover, less is known about the role of parents in this link. Using large-scale longitudinal data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study (N = 9574; mean age = 9.94 years at baseline, SD = .63; 50% girls), the current study took an integrative biopsychosocial approach to explore the longitudinal link between early adolescents’ fronto-striatal connectivity and their academic achievement, with attention to the moderating role of parental warmth. Results showed that weaker intrinsic connectivity between the frontoparietal network and the striatum was associated with early adolescents’ worse academic achievement over 2 years during early adolescence. Notably, parental warmth moderated the association between fronto-striatal connectivity and academic achievement, such that weaker fronto-striatal connectivity was only predictive of worse academic achievement among early adolescents who experienced low levels of parental warmth. Taken together, the findings demonstrate weaker fronto-striatal connectivity as a risk factor for early adolescents’ academic development and highlight parental warmth as a protective factor for academic development among those with weaker connectivity within the inhibitory control system.

Journal

Journal of research on adolescence : the official journal of the Society for Research on Adolescence

Published

2024/05/08

Authors

Yang B, Zhou Z, Chen YY, Devakonda V, Cai T, Lee TH, Qu Y

Keywords

academic achievement, adolescence, frontoparietal, inhibitory control, parental warmth, striatum

DOI

10.1111/jora.12949
Toggle Researching COVID to enhance recovery (RECOVER) pediatric study protocol: Rationale, objectives and design. PloS one Gross RS, Thaweethai T, Rosenzweig EB, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

The prevalence, pathophysiology, and long-term outcomes of COVID-19 (post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 [PASC] or “Long COVID”) in children and young adults remain unknown. Studies must address the urgent need to define PASC, its mechanisms, and potential treatment targets in children and young adults.

Journal

PloS one

Published

2024/05/07

Authors

Gross RS, Thaweethai T, Rosenzweig EB, Chan J, Chibnik LB, Cicek MS, Elliott AJ, Flaherman VJ, Foulkes AS, Gage Witvliet M, Gallagher R, Gennaro ML, Jernigan TL, Karlson EW, Katz SD, Kinser PA, Kleinman LC, Lamendola-Essel MF, Milner JD, Mohandas S, Mudumbi PC, Newburger JW, Rhee KE, Salisbury AL, Snowden JN, Stein CR, Stockwell MS, Tantisira KG, Thomason ME, Truong DT, Warburton D, Wood JC, Ahmed S, Akerlundh A, Alshawabkeh AN, Anderson BR, Aschner JL, Atz AM, Aupperle RL, Baker FC, Balaraman V, Banerjee D, Barch DM, Baskin-Sommers A, Bhuiyan S, Bind MC, Bogie AL, Bradford T, Buchbinder NC, Bueler E, Bükülmez H, Casey BJ, Chang L, Chrisant M, Clark DB, Clifton RG, Clouser KN, Cottrell L, Cowan K, D'Sa V, Dapretto M, Dasgupta S, Dehority W, Dionne A, Dummer KB, Elias MD, Esquenazi-Karonika S, Evans DN, Faustino EVS, Fiks AG, Forsha D, Foxe JJ, Friedman NP, Fry G, Gaur S, Gee DG, Gray KM, Handler S, Harahsheh AS, Hasbani K, Heath AC, Hebson C, Heitzeg MM, Hester CM, Hill S, Hobart-Porter L, Hong TKF, Horowitz CR, Hsia DS, Huentelman M, Hummel KD, Irby K, Jacobus J, Jacoby VL, Jone PN, Kaelber DC, Kasmarcak TJ, Kluko MJ, Kosut JS, Laird AR, Landeo-Gutierrez J, Lang SM, Larson CL, Lim PPC, Lisdahl KM, McCrindle BW, McCulloh RJ, McHugh K, Mendelsohn AL, Metz TD, Miller J, Mitchell EC, Morgan LM, Müller-Oehring EM, Nahin ER, Neale MC, Ness-Cochinwala M, Nolan SM, Oliveira CR, Osakwe O, Oster ME, Payne RM, Portman MA, Raissy H, Randall IG, Rao S, Reeder HT, Rosas JM, Russell MW, Sabati AA, Sanil Y, Sato AI, Schechter MS, Selvarangan R, Sexson Tejtel SK, Shakti D, Sharma K, Squeglia LM, Srivastava S, Stevenson MD, Szmuszkovicz J, Talavera-Barber MM, Teufel RJ, Thacker D, Trachtenberg F, Udosen MM, Warner MR, Watson SE, Werzberger A, Weyer JC, Wood MJ, Yin HS, Zempsky WT, Zimmerman E, Dreyer BP

Keywords

DOI

10.1371/journal.pone.0285635
Toggle Commercial Cannabidiol for Community-Based Young Adolescents: Predicting Medicinal Use. Cannabis and cannabinoid research Wade NE, Nguyen-Louie TT, Wallace AL, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Cannabidiol (CBD) is rising in popularity, including as a potential medicinal product. Yet data on use of commercial CBD for medicinal or health reasons in adolescents are lacking. In this study we aim to detail characteristics of adolescents given commercial CBD for health reasons (health CBD [hCBD]) and to investigate predictors of use. The Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study is a population-based cohort study following U.S. healthy, community-based adolescents annually, with data from 2018 to 2022 (11- to 15-year-olds; =11,189). Participants and caregivers completed questionnaires, including whether adolescents were given CBD with parent or doctor’s permission. Participants reported past-month pain, attention problems, externalizing symptoms, internalizing symptoms, and total mental health problems. Caregivers reported youth sociodemographics, sleep problems, whether the youth had mental health treatment or sought medical treatment, and rules about recreational cannabis use. We describe youth given hCBD, and run generalized estimating equations predicting odd ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals of adolescents given hCBD by mental health, physical health, or sociodemographics of factors. Of the 11,189 participants across up to three waves of data, 48% were female. Mean age across waves was 12.8 years old (SD=1). In total, 307 (2.8%) were given hCBD. Common administration methods were oil (42%), topical (31%), and edibles (29%). Increased hCBD odds were associated with being older (OR=1.32 [1.17-1.49]), White (relative to Black, OR=05.97 [2.81-12.65] or Hispanic, OR=1.82 [1.17-2.82]), parents with some college (relative to no high school diploma, OR=3.55 [1.09-11.6]), internalizing symptoms (OR=1.81 [1.13-2.91]), mental health treatment (OR=1.76 [1.3-2.38]), pain (OR=1.38 [1.09-1.76]), medical treatment (OR=1.39 [1.08-1.79]), and sleep problems (OR=1.69 [1.27-2.25]). Rules against recreational cannabis decreased odds of hCBD (OR=1.75 [1.30-2.36]). Findings indicate some healthy adolescents are given hCBD, and predictors of use include mental and physical health concerns, being White, older, and parents with some college education. Providers should ask if their youth patients are being given CBD medicinally, and transparently discuss potential benefits, consequences, and unknowns of CBD.

Journal

Cannabis and cannabinoid research

Published

2024/05/07

Authors

Wade NE, Nguyen-Louie TT, Wallace AL, Sullivan RM, Tapert SF

Keywords

CBD, adolescents, cannabidiol, commercial CBD, medicinal CBD

DOI

10.1089/can.2024.0015
Toggle Smaller subcortical volume relates to greater weight gain in girls with initially healthy weight. Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) Adise S, Ottino-Gonzalez J, Hayati Rezvan P, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Among 3614 youth who were 9 to 12 years old and initially did not have overweight or obesity (12% [n = 385] developed overweight or obesity), we examined the natural progression of weight gain and brain structure development during a 2-year period with a high risk for obesity (e.g., pre- and early adolescence) to determine the following: 1) whether variation in maturational trajectories of the brain regions contributes to weight gain; and/or 2) whether weight gain contributes to altered brain development.

Journal

Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.)

Published

2024/05/06

Authors

Adise S, Ottino-Gonzalez J, Hayati Rezvan P, Kan E, Rhee KE, Goran MI, Sowell ER

Keywords

DOI

10.1002/oby.24028
Toggle Screen use in transgender and gender-questioning adolescents: Findings from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study. Annals of epidemiology Nagata JM, Balasubramanian P, Iyra P, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

To assess the association between transgender or gender-questioning identity and screen use (recreational screen time and problematic screen use) in a demographically diverse national sample of early adolescents in the U.S.

Journal

Annals of epidemiology

Published

2024/05/06

Authors

Nagata JM, Balasubramanian P, Iyra P, Ganson KT, Testa A, He J, Glidden DV, Baker FC

Keywords

LGBTQ+, adolescent, gender identity, gender minority, screen time, social media, transgender, video games

DOI

10.1016/j.annepidem.2024.04.013
Toggle Racial-Ethnic Discrimination and Early Adolescents' Behavioral Problems: The Protective Role of Parental Warmth. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Yan J, Jelsma E, Wang Y, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to investigate the association between discrimination by multiple sources (i.e., teachers, students, and other adults) and early adolescents’ behavioral problems (i.e., internalizing, externalizing, and attention problems), also considering the protective role of parental warmth in this association.

Journal

Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

Published

2024/05/03

Authors

Yan J, Jelsma E, Wang Y, Zhang Y, Zhao Z, Cham H, Alegria M, Yip T

Keywords

ABCD study, discrimination, early adolescents’ behavioral problems, parental warmth, racial-ethnic minority

DOI

10.1016/j.jaac.2024.03.020
Toggle Adolescent Neurodevelopmental Variance Across Social Strata. JAMA network open Bottenhorn KL, Cardenas-Iniguez C, Schachner JN, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Journal

JAMA network open

Published

2024/05/01

Authors

Bottenhorn KL, Cardenas-Iniguez C, Schachner JN, Rosario MA, Mills KL, Laird AR, Herting MM

Keywords

DOI

10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2024.10441
Toggle Predictors of Substance Use Initiation by Early Adolescence. The American journal of psychiatry Green R, Wolf BJ, Chen A, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Substance use initiation during early adolescence is associated with later development of substance use and mental health disorders. This study used various domains to predict substance use initiation, defined as trying any nonprescribed substance (e.g., alcohol, tobacco, cannabis), by age 12, using a large longitudinal data set.

Journal

The American journal of psychiatry

Published

2024/05/01

Authors

Green R, Wolf BJ, Chen A, Kirkland AE, Ferguson PL, Browning BD, Bryant BE, Tomko RL, Gray KM, Mewton L, Squeglia LM

Keywords

Child/Adolescent Psychiatry, Development, Substance-Related and Addictive Disorders

DOI

10.1176/appi.ajp.20230882
Toggle Childhood internalizing, externalizing and attention symptoms predict changes in social and nonsocial screen time. Social psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology Keyes K, Hamilton A, Finsaas M, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

While accumulating research has tested the hypothesis that screen time causes psychiatric symptoms in children, less attention has been paid to the hypothesis that children with psychiatric symptoms change their patterns of screen time and digital media use. We aimed to test whether children with psychiatric symptoms subsequently change their patterns of screen time and digital media use.

Journal

Social psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology

Published

2024/04/29

Authors

Keyes K, Hamilton A, Finsaas M, Kreski N

Keywords

Attentio, Externalizing, Internalizing, Screen Time, Social Media

DOI

10.1007/s00127-024-02669-3
Toggle NowIKnowMyABCD: A global resource hub for researchers using data from the ABCD Study. Developmental cognitive neuroscience Ali SA, McCann CF, Thieu MK, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

The Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study, involving over 11,000 youth and their families, is a groundbreaking project examining various factors impacting brain and cognitive development. Despite yielding hundreds of publications and counting, the ABCD Study has lacked a centralized help platform to assist researchers in navigating and analyzing the extensive ABCD dataset. To support the ABCD research community, we created NowIKnowMyABCD, the first centralized documentation and communication resource publicly available to researchers using ABCD Study data. It consists of two core elements: a user-focused website and a moderated discussion board. The website serves as a repository for ABCD-related resources, tutorials, and a live feed of relevant updates and queries sourced from social media websites. The discussion board offers a platform for researchers to seek guidance, troubleshoot issues, and engage with peers. Our aim is for NowIKnowMyABCD to grow with participation from the ABCD research community, fostering transparency, collaboration, and adherence to open science principles.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2024/04/27

Authors

Ali SA, McCann CF, Thieu MK, Whitmore LB, Laird AR

Keywords

Adolescent brain development, Community resource, Open science

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2024.101388
Toggle Lifetime residential history collection and processing for environmental data linkages in the ABCD study. Health & place Abad S, Badilla P, Marshall AT, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

By using geospatial information such as participants’ residential history along with external datasets of environmental exposures, ongoing studies can enrich their cohorts to investigate the role of the environment on brain-behavior health outcomes. However, challenges may arise if clear guidance and key quality control steps are not taken at the outset of data collection of residential information. Here, we detail the protocol development aimed at improving the collection of lifetime residential address information from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study. This protocol generates a workflow for minimizing gaps in residential information, improving data collection processes, and reducing misclassification error in exposure estimates.

Journal

Health & place

Published

2024/04/26

Authors

Abad S, Badilla P, Marshall AT, Smith C, Tsui B, Cardenas-Iniguez C, Herting MM

Keywords

ABCD study, Environment, Geospatial data, Lifetime addresses, Residential history

DOI

10.1016/j.healthplace.2024.103238
Toggle Genetics impact risk of Alzheimer's disease through mechanisms modulating structural brain morphology in late life. Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry Korologou-Linden R, Xu B, Coulthard E, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-related neuropathological changes can occur decades before clinical symptoms. We aimed to investigate whether neurodevelopment and/or neurodegeneration affects the risk of AD, through reducing structural brain reserve and/or increasing brain atrophy, respectively.

Journal

Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry

Published

2024/04/25

Authors

Korologou-Linden R, Xu B, Coulthard E, Walton E, Wearn A, Hemani G, White T, Cecil C, Sharp T, Tiemeier H, Banaschewski T, Bokde A, Desrivières S, Flor H, Grigis A, Garavan H, Gowland P, Heinz A, Brühl R, Martinot JL, Paillère Martinot ML, Artiges E, Nees F, Orfanos DP, Paus T, Poustka L, Millenet S, Fröhner JH, Smolka M, Walter H, Winterer J, Whelan R, Schumann G, Howe LD, Ben-Shlomo Y, Davies NM, Anderson EL

Keywords

Alzheimer's disease, brain mapping, epidemiology, genetics, neuroanatomy

DOI

10.1136/jnnp-2023-332969
Toggle Longitudinal patterns of companion animals in families with children during the COVID-19 pandemic: Findings from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study. Frontiers in veterinary science King EK, Dowling-Guyer S, McCobb E, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Pet acquisition purportedly increased during the COVID-19 pandemic with individuals acquiring pets during periods of social isolation. Families with children experienced unique challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic, balancing childcare, remote schooling, and other needs and therefore patterns of pet acquisition and loss may differ from the broader population. The goal of this study was to understand patterns of pet ownership within families with adolescents during the pandemic to help identify areas for improved support and programmatic recommendations. Using self-reported survey data from a sample of 7,590 American adolescents from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study COVID Survey, we found no evidence for large-scale changes in pet acquisition or relinquishment during the first year of the pandemic for families with adolescents in the U.S. Future research should explore the effects of pet acquisition and pet loss on families with adolescents and what resources are needed to support pet ownership during stressors such as the COVID-19 pandemic.

Journal

Frontiers in veterinary science

Published

2024/04/24

Authors

King EK, Dowling-Guyer S, McCobb E, Mueller MK

Keywords

COVID-19, companion animal, demographics, pandemic (COVID19), pet ownership

DOI

10.3389/fvets.2024.1364718
Toggle Screen time, sleep, brain structural neurobiology, and sequential associations with child and adolescent psychopathology: Insights from the ABCD study. Journal of behavioral addictions Zhao Y, Paulus MP, Tapert SF, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

The precise roles of screen media activity (SMA) and sleep problems in relation to child/adolescent psychopathology remain ambiguous. We investigated temporal relationships among sleep problems, SMA, and psychopathology and potential involvement of thalamus-prefrontal-cortex (PFC)-brainstem structural covariation.

Journal

Journal of behavioral addictions

Published

2024/04/24

Authors

Zhao Y, Paulus MP, Tapert SF, Bagot KS, Constable RT, Yaggi HK, Redeker NS, Potenza MN

Keywords

Internet addiction, addictive behaviors, adolescent, brain structural covariation, insomnia, screen media activity

DOI

10.1556/2006.2024.00016
Toggle Probing the digital exposome: associations of social media use patterns with youth mental health NPP—Digital Psychiatry and Neuroscience Pagliaccio D, Tran KT, Visoki E, et al. 2024
Link to publication

Abstract

Recently, the U.S. Surgeon General issued an advisory highlighting the lack of knowledge about the safety of ubiquitous social media use on adolescent mental health. For many youths, social media use can become excessive and can contribute to frequent exposure to adverse peer interactions (e.g., cyberbullying, and hate speech). Nonetheless, social media use is complex, and although there are clear challenges, it also can create critical new avenues for connection, particularly among marginalized youth. In the current project, we leverage a large nationally diverse sample of adolescents from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study assessed between 2019–2020 (N = 10,147, Mage = 12.0, 48% assigned female at birth, 20% Black, 20% Hispanic) to test the associations between specific facets of adolescent social media use (e.g., type of apps used, time spent, addictive patterns of use) and overall mental health. Specifically, a data-driven exposome-wide association was applied to generate digital exposomic risk scores that aggregate the cumulative burden of digital risk exposure. This included general usage, cyberbullying, having secret accounts, problematic/addictive use behavior, and other factors. In validation models, digital exposomic risk explained substantial variance in general child-reported psychopathology, and a history of suicide attempt, over and above sociodemographics, non-social screentime, and non-digital adversity (e.g., abuse, poverty). Furthermore, differences in digital exposomic scores also shed insight into mental health disparities, among youth of color and sexual and gender minority youth. Our work using a data-driven approach supports the notion that digital exposures, in particular social media use, contribute to the mental health burden of US adolescents.

Journal

NPP—Digital Psychiatry and Neuroscience

Published

2024/04/23

Authors

Pagliaccio D, Tran KT, Visoki E, DiDomenico GE, Auerbach RP, Barzilay R

Keywords

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/s44277-024-00006-9
Toggle Differences in educational opportunity predict white matter development. Developmental cognitive neuroscience Roy E, Van Rinsveld A, Nedelec P, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Coarse measures of socioeconomic status, such as parental income or parental education, have been linked to differences in white matter development. However, these measures do not provide insight into specific aspects of an individual’s environment and how they relate to brain development. On the other hand, educational intervention studies have shown that changes in an individual’s educational context can drive measurable changes in their white matter. These studies, however, rarely consider socioeconomic factors in their results. In the present study, we examined the unique relationship between educational opportunity and white matter development, when controlling other known socioeconomic factors. To explore this question, we leveraged the rich demographic and neuroimaging data available in the ABCD study, as well the unique data-crosswalk between ABCD and the Stanford Education Data Archive (SEDA). We find that educational opportunity is related to accelerated white matter development, even when accounting for other socioeconomic factors, and that this relationship is most pronounced in white matter tracts associated with academic skills. These results suggest that the school a child attends has a measurable relationship with brain development for years to come.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2024/04/22

Authors

Roy E, Van Rinsveld A, Nedelec P, Richie-Halford A, Rauschecker AM, Sugrue LP, Rokem A, McCandliss BD, Yeatman JD

Keywords

Development, Education, Socioeconomic Status, White Matter

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2024.101386
Toggle Multi-ancestry meta-analysis of tobacco use disorder identifies 461 potential risk genes and reveals associations with multiple health outcomes. Nature human behaviour Toikumo S, Jennings MV, Pham BK, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Tobacco use disorder (TUD) is the most prevalent substance use disorder in the world. Genetic factors influence smoking behaviours and although strides have been made using genome-wide association studies to identify risk variants, most variants identified have been for nicotine consumption, rather than TUD. Here we leveraged four US biobanks to perform a multi-ancestral meta-analysis of TUD (derived via electronic health records) in 653,790 individuals (495,005 European, 114,420 African American and 44,365 Latin American) and data from UK Biobank (n = 898,680). We identified 88 independent risk loci; integration with functional genomic tools uncovered 461 potential risk genes, primarily expressed in the brain. TUD was genetically correlated with smoking and psychiatric traits from traditionally ascertained cohorts, externalizing behaviours in children and hundreds of medical outcomes, including HIV infection, heart disease and pain. This work furthers our biological understanding of TUD and establishes electronic health records as a source of phenotypic information for studying the genetics of TUD.

Journal

Nature human behaviour

Published

2024/04/17

Authors

Toikumo S, Jennings MV, Pham BK, Lee H, Mallard TT, Bianchi SB, Meredith JJ, Vilar-Ribó L, Xu H, Hatoum AS, Johnson EC, Pazdernik VK, Jinwala Z, Pakala SR, Leger BS, Niarchou M, Ehinmowo M, , Jenkins GD, Batzler A, Pendegraft R, Palmer AA, Zhou H, Biernacka JM, Coombes BJ, Gelernter J, Xu K, Hancock DB, Cox NJ, Smoller JW, Davis LK, Justice AC, Kranzler HR, Kember RL, Sanchez-Roige S

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41562-024-01851-6
Toggle Do traumatic events and substance use co-occur during adolescence? Testing three causal etiologic hypotheses. Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines Patel H, Tapert SF, Brown SA, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Why do potentially traumatic events (PTEs) and substance use (SU) so commonly co-occur during adolescence? Causal hypotheses developed from the study of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorder (SUD) among adults have not yet been subject to rigorous theoretical analysis or empirical tests among adolescents with the precursors to these disorders: PTEs and SU. Establishing causality demands accounting for various factors (e.g. genetics, parent education, race/ethnicity) that distinguish youth endorsing PTEs and SU from those who do not, a step often overlooked in previous research.

Journal

Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines

Published

2024/04/15

Authors

Patel H, Tapert SF, Brown SA, Norman SB, Pelham WE

Keywords

Trauma, adolescence, alcohol, cannabis, childhood, etiology, nicotine, self‐medication, shared liability, susceptibility

DOI

10.1111/jcpp.13985
Toggle Removing scanner effects with a multivariate latent approach - a RELIEF for the ABCD imaging data? Imaging Neuroscience Kraft D, Matte Bon G, Breton E, et al. 2024
Link to Publication

Abstract

Scan site harmonization is a crucial part of any neuroimaging analysis when data has been pooled across different study sites. Zhang and colleagues recently introduced the multivariate harmonization method RELIEF, aiming to remove explicit and latent scan site effects. Their initial validation in an adult sample showed superior performance compared to established methods. We here sought to investigate utility of RELIEF in harmonizing data from the ABCD study, a widely used resource for developmental brain imaging. We benchmarked RELIEF against unharmonized, ComBat, and CovBat harmonized data and investigated the impact of manufacturer type, sample size, and a narrow sample age range on harmonization performance. We found that in cases where sites with sufficiently large samples were harmonized, RELIEF outperformed other techniques, yet in cases where sites with very small samples were included there was substantial performance variation unique to RELIEF. Our results therefore highlight the need for careful quality control when harmonizing data sets with imbalanced samples like the ABCD cohort. Our comment alongside shared scripts may provide guidance for other scholars wanting to integrate best practices in their ABCD related work.

Journal

Imaging Neuroscience

Published

2024/04/15

Authors

Kraft D, Matte Bon G, Breton E, Seidel P, Kaufmann T

Keywords

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1162/imag_a_00157
Toggle Longitudinal associations between neighborhood safety and adolescent adjustment: The moderating role of affective neural sensitivity. Developmental cognitive neuroscience Cai T, Yang B, Zhou Z, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Research on social determinants of health has highlighted the influence of neighborhood characteristics (e.g., neighborhood safety) on adolescents’ health. However, it is less clear how changes in neighborhood environments play a role in adolescent development, and who are more sensitive to such changes. Utilizing the first three waves of data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) project (N = 7932, M (SD) = 9.93 (.63) years at T1; 51% boys), the present study found that increases in neighborhood safety were associated with decreased adolescent externalizing symptoms, internalizing symptoms, but not sleep disturbance over time, controlling for baseline neighborhood safety. Further, adolescents’ insula and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) reactivity to positive emotional stimuli moderated the association between changes in neighborhood safety and adolescent adjustment. Among youth who showed higher, but not lower, insula and ACC reactivity to positive emotion, increases in neighborhood safety were linked with better adjustment. The current study contributes to the differential susceptibility literature by identifying affective neural sensitivity as a marker of youth’s susceptibility to changes in neighborhood environment. The findings highlight the importance of neighborhood safety for youth during the transition to adolescence, particularly for those with heightened affective neural sensitivity.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2024/04/12

Authors

Cai T, Yang B, Zhou Z, Ip KI, Adam EK, Haase CM, Qu Y

Keywords

Anterior cingulate cortex, Differential susceptibility, Insula, Mental health, Neighborhood safety, Sleep

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2024.101380
Toggle Whole genome sequencing identifies associations for nonsyndromic sagittal craniosynostosis with the intergenic region of BMP2 and noncoding RNA gene LINC01428. Scientific reports Musolf AM, Justice CM, Erdogan-Yildirim Z, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Craniosynostosis (CS) is a major birth defect resulting from premature fusion of cranial sutures. Nonsyndromic CS occurs more frequently than syndromic CS, with sagittal nonsyndromic craniosynostosis (sNCS) presenting as the most common CS phenotype. Previous genome-wide association and targeted sequencing analyses of sNCS have identified multiple associated loci, with the strongest association on chromosome 20. Herein, we report the first whole-genome sequencing study of sNCS using 63 proband-parent trios. Sequencing data for these trios were analyzed using the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) and rare variant TDT (rvTDT) to identify high-risk rare gene variants. Sequencing data were also examined for copy number variants (CNVs) and de novo variants. TDT analysis identified a highly significant locus at 20p12.3, localized to the intergenic region between BMP2 and the noncoding RNA gene LINC01428. Three variants (rs6054763, rs6054764, rs932517) were identified as potential causal variants due to their probability of being transcription factor binding sites, deleterious combined annotation dependent depletion scores, and high minor allele enrichment in probands. Morphometric analysis of cranial vault shape in an unaffected cohort validated the effect of these three single nucleotide variants (SNVs) on dolichocephaly. No genome-wide significant rare variants, de novo loci, or CNVs were identified. Future efforts to identify risk variants for sNCS should include sequencing of larger and more diverse population samples and increased omics analyses, such as RNA-seq and ATAC-seq.

Journal

Scientific reports

Published

2024/04/12

Authors

Musolf AM, Justice CM, Erdogan-Yildirim Z, Goovaerts S, Cuellar A, Shaffer JR, Marazita ML, Claes P, Weinberg SM, Li J, Senders C, Zwienenberg M, Simeonov E, Kaneva R, Roscioli T, Di Pietro L, Barba M, Lattanzi W, Cunningham ML, Romitti PA, Boyadjiev SA

Keywords

Craniosynostosis, Sagittal suture, Transmission disequilibrium test, Trio study, Whole genome sequencing

DOI

10.1038/s41598-024-58343-w
Toggle Examining neural responses to anticipating or receiving monetary rewards and the development of binge eating in youth. A registered report using data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study. Developmental cognitive neuroscience Lowe CJ, Bodell LP 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Binge eating is characterized as eating a large amount of food and feeling a loss of control while eating. However, the neurobiological mechanisms associated with the onset and maintenance of binge eating are largely unknown. Recent neuroimaging work has suggested that increased responsivity within reward regions of the brain to the anticipation or receipt of rewards is related to binge eating; however, limited longitudinal data has precluded understanding of the role of reward responsivity in the development of binge eating. The current study used data from the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development® (ABCD) longitudinal study dataset to assess whether heightened neural responses to different phases of reward processing (reward anticipation and receipt) (1) differentiated individuals with binge eating from matched controls, and (2) predicted the onset of binge eating in an “at risk” sample. Consistent with hypotheses, heightened neural responsivity in the right caudate and bilateral VS during reward anticipation differentiated youth with and without binge eating. Moreover, greater VS response to reward anticipation predicted binge eating two years later. Neural responses to reward receipt also were consistent with hypotheses, such that heightened VS and OFC responses differentiated youth with and without binge eating and predicted the presence of binge eating two years later. Findings from the current study suggest that hypersensitivity to rewards may contribute to the development of binge eating during early adolescence.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2024/04/11

Authors

Lowe CJ, Bodell LP

Keywords

ABCD Study, Adolescents, Binge Eating, Disordered Eating, Reward

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2024.101377
Toggle Childhood adversity is associated with reduced BOLD response in inhibitory control regions amongst preadolescents from the ABCD study. Developmental cognitive neuroscience Stinson EA, Sullivan RM, Navarro GY, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Adolescence is characterized by dynamic neurodevelopment, which poses opportunities for risk and resilience. Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) confer additional risk to the developing brain, where ACEs have been associated with alterations in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) BOLD signaling in brain regions underlying inhibitory control. Socioenvironmental factors like the family environment may amplify or buffer against the neurodevelopmental risks associated with ACEs. Using baseline to Year 2 follow-up data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study, the current study examined how ACEs relate to fMRI BOLD signaling during successful inhibition on the Stop Signal Task in regions associated with inhibitory control and examined whether family conflict levels moderated that relationship. Results showed that greater ACEs were associated with reduced BOLD response in the right opercular region of the inferior frontal gyrus and bilaterally in the pre-supplementary motor area, which are key regions underlying inhibitory control. Further, greater BOLD response was correlated with less impulsivity behaviorally, suggesting reduced activation may not be behaviorally adaptive at this age. No significant two or three-way interactions with family conflict levels or time were found. Findings highlight the continued utility of examining the relationship between ACEs and neurodevelopmental outcomes and the importance of intervention/prevention of ACES.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2024/04/09

Authors

Stinson EA, Sullivan RM, Navarro GY, Wallace AL, Larson CL, Lisdahl KM

Keywords

Adolescence, Adverse childhood experiences, Family environment, Functional magnetic resonance imaging, Inhibitory control

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2024.101378
Toggle Estimating the prevalence of Non-Verbal Learning Disability (NVLD) from the ABCD sample. Scientific reports Coccaro A, Banich M, Mammarella IC, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Non-Verbal Learning Disability (NVLD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by deficits in processing visuospatial information but with age-appropriate verbal skills. This cognitive profile has been hypothesized to be associated with atypical white matter, but at the present there is a lack of evidence for this hypothesis. Currently, the condition is not characterized within the main diagnostic systems, in part because no clear set of criteria for characterizing the disorder exists. This report is the first attempt to estimate NVLD prevalence, using two sets of diagnostic criteria, in a large sample of over 11,000 children who were selected without regards to problems of specific nature, either psychological, neurological, physical and/or social. Furthermore, it examined the association between the profile of cognitive abilities and aspects of whole-brain white matter measures in children with and without symptoms associated with NVLD. Participants were drawn from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study, a 10-year longitudinal study of 11,876 children in the U.S. The data used in the present study were drawn from the initial testing point at which the children were 9-10 years old. Prevalence of NVLD based on two distinct sets of criteria, correlations between the measures used to create the criteria, correlations between criteria measures and measures of white matter integrity. The cognitive criteria included measures of visuospatial processing, reading, intelligence and social skills. By varying the cut-offs applied to social skills in conjunction with visuo-spatial difficulties, spared reading skills and intelligence scores, we calculated prevalence for two NVLD groups. White matter characteristics were measures of volume, fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity. Based on the criteria used, the estimated prevalence of NVLD varied from 1 to 8%. Furthermore, children with NVLD showed a dissociation between measures of visuo-spatial processing not observed in non-NVLD children. At the neurological level, findings provide preliminary evidence of associations between the cognitive profile of NVLD and abnormalities in white matters tracts. The present study documents that exists, within this large non-selected sample, a proportion of youth who show evidence of NVLD. Given those results, it appears essential to establish the best diagnostic criteria, to improve the treatment options and quality of life for children with this disorder.

Journal

Scientific reports

Published

2024/04/08

Authors

Coccaro A, Banich M, Mammarella IC, Liotti M

Keywords

DOI

10.1038/s41598-024-58639-x
Toggle The impacts of early environmental adversity on cognitive functioning, body mass, and life-history behavioral profiles. Brain and cognition Yang A, Jing Lu H, Chang L 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Early adverse experiences or exposures have a profound impact on neurophysiological, cognitive, and somatic development. Evidence across disciplines uncovers adversity-induced alternations in cortical structures, cognitive functions, and related behavioral manifestations, as well as an energetic trade-off between the brain and body. Based on the life history (LH) framework, the present research aims to explore the adversity-adapted cognitive-behavioral mechanism and investigate the relation between cognitive functioning and somatic energy reserve (i.e., body mass index; BMI). A structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis was performed with longitudinal self-reported, anthropometric, and task-based data drawn from a cohort of 2,607 8- to 11-year-old youths and their primary caregivers recruited by the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study. The results showed that early environmental adversity was positively associated with fast LH behavioral profiles and negatively with cognitive functioning. Moreover, cognitive functioning mediated the relationship between adversity and fast LH behavioral profiles. Additionally, we found that early environmental adversity positively predicted BMI, which was inversely correlated with cognitive functioning. These results revealed an adversity-adapted cognitive-behavioral mechanism and energy-allocation pathways, and add to the existing knowledge of LH trade-off and developmental plasticity.

Journal

Brain and cognition

Published

2024/04/08

Authors

Yang A, Jing Lu H, Chang L

Keywords

Body Mass Index (BMI), Cognitive Development, Cognitive Functions, Early Environmental Adversity, Life History Theory, Trade-Off

DOI

10.1016/j.bandc.2024.106159
Toggle Predicting depression risk in early adolescence via multimodal brain imaging. NeuroImage. Clinical Gracia-Tabuenca Z, Barbeau EB, Xia Y, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Depression is an incapacitating psychiatric disorder with increased risk through adolescence. Among other factors, children with family history of depression have significantly higher risk of developing depression. Early identification of pre-adolescent children who are at risk of depression is crucial for early intervention and prevention. In this study, we used a large longitudinal sample from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study (2658 participants after imaging quality control, between 9-10 years at baseline), we applied advanced machine learning methods to predict depression risk at the two-year follow-up from the baseline assessment, using a set of comprehensive multimodal neuroimaging features derived from structural MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, and task and rest functional MRI. Prediction performance underwent a rigorous cross-validation method of leave-one-site-out. Our results demonstrate that all brain features had prediction scores significantly better than expected by chance, with brain features from rest-fMRI showing the best classification performance in the high-risk group of participants with parental history of depression (N = 625). Specifically, rest-fMRI features, which came from functional connectomes, showed significantly better classification performance than other brain features. This finding highlights the key role of the interacting elements of the connectome in capturing more individual variability in psychopathology compared to measures of single brain regions. Our study contributes to the effort of identifying biological risks of depression in early adolescence in population-based samples.

Journal

NeuroImage. Clinical

Published

2024/04/08

Authors

Gracia-Tabuenca Z, Barbeau EB, Xia Y, Chai X

Keywords

Adolescence, Depression risk, Elastic net, Multi-modal MRI, Multi-site, Parental depression

DOI

10.1016/j.nicl.2024.103604
Toggle Factor Structure of the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale among Early Adolescents: Results from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment Smith JE, Brinkman HR, DiBello AM, et al. 2024
Link to Publication

Abstract

Introduction
Emotion regulation (ER) deficits in early adolescence are associated with subsequent negative health consequences, including anxiety and depression. Yet, limited work has evaluated the factor structure of measures of ER deficits in early adolescents, leaving a methodological gap for at-risk youths.

Method
This study examined the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS) factor structure in early adolescents (N = 2300) recruited from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study. We randomly split the sample into two sub-samples (n = 1150 each) and implemented an a-priori three-pronged approach: (1) A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) assessed the fit of the six-factor DERS in Sample 1; (2) An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) identified an alternative factor structure in Sample 1; and (3) A second CFA assessed the new model in Sample 2. A bi-factor model was also used to assess the global structure of the DERS total and subscales.

Results
The original six-factor model yielded poor-to-adequate fit. EFA results supported an alternative five-factor model with different item mappings and ten omitted items. CFA results supported the five-factor solution with good fit. The bi-factor model, estimating a general factor with the five subscales, also demonstrated good fit.

Discussion
A five-factor structure of the DERS appears supported in a large community sample of early adolescents. Items from the former Awareness and Clarity subscales were combined into a single factor. Nearly all items from the former Strategies subscale were omitted, suggesting there may be developmental considerations rendering those items less relevant.

Journal

Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment

Published

2024/04/06

Authors

Smith JE, Brinkman HR, DiBello AM, Hamilton JL, Leyro TM, Altman BR, Farris SG

Keywords

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10862-024-10135-2
Toggle Voxel-wise multivariate analysis of brain-psychosocial associations in adolescents reveals six latent dimensions of cognition and psychopathology. Biological psychiatry. Cognitive neuroscience and neuroimaging Adams RA, Zor C, Mihalik A, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Adolescence heralds the onset of much psychopathology, which may be conceptualized as an emergence of altered covariation between symptoms and brain measures. Multivariate methods can detect such modes of covariation or latent dimensions, but none specifically relating to psychopathology have yet been found using population-level structural brain data. Using voxel-wise (instead of parcellated) brain data may strengthen latent dimensions’ brain-psychosocial relationships, but this creates computational challenges.

Journal

Biological psychiatry. Cognitive neuroscience and neuroimaging

Published

2024/04/06

Authors

Adams RA, Zor C, Mihalik A, Tsirlis K, Brudfors M, Chapman J, Ashburner J, Paulus MP, Mourão-Miranda J

Keywords

brain-behaviour associations, machine learning, neurodevelopment, partial least squares, psychopathology, structural MRI

DOI

10.1016/j.bpsc.2024.03.006
Toggle Brain volumes, behavioral inhibition, and anxiety disorders in children: results from the adolescent brain cognitive development study. BMC psychiatry Hammoud RA, Ammar LA, McCall SJ, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have identified brain changes associated with anxiety disorders (ADs), but the results remain mixed, particularly at a younger age. One key predictor of ADs is behavioral inhibition (BI), a childhood tendency for high avoidance of novel stimuli. This study aimed to evaluate the relationships between candidate brain regions, BI, and ADs among children using baseline data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study.

Journal

BMC psychiatry

Published

2024/04/04

Authors

Hammoud RA, Ammar LA, McCall SJ, Shamseddeen W, Elbejjani M

Keywords

Anxiety disorders, Behavioral inhibition, Brain development, Brain volumes, Child development, Children

DOI

10.1186/s12888-024-05725-z
Toggle Multiple marginalization, discrimination, and disordered eating among youth aged 10-11. The International journal of eating disorders Boswell RG, Launius KN, Lydecker JA 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Although rates of weight discrimination are on-par with racial, ethnic, and gender discrimination, comparatively less work has examined impacts of weight-based discrimination in youth, including on disordered eating. Knowing whether experiences of weight-based discrimination, including in youth with multiply-marginalized identities, are associated with disordered eating could identify vulnerable youth and inform intervention efforts.

Journal

The International journal of eating disorders

Published

2024/04/04

Authors

Boswell RG, Launius KN, Lydecker JA

Keywords

binge‐eating disorder, body image, bulimia nervosa, discrimination, eating disorders, weight

DOI

10.1002/eat.24211
Toggle Lifetime residential data collection protocol for the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study. MethodsX Badilla P, Abad S, Smith C, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Understanding the impacts of environmental exposures on health outcomes during development is an important area of research for plenty of reasons. Collecting retrospective and prospective residential history can enrich observational studies through eventual linkages to external sources. Augmenting participant health outcome data with environmental data can better inform on the role of the environment, thereby enhancing prevention and intervention efforts. However, collecting the geospatial information needed for this type of research can be difficult, especially when data are collected directly from participants. Participants’ residential histories are unique and often complex. Collecting residential history data often involves capturing precise spatial locations along specific timeframes as well as contending with recall bias and unique, complex living arrangements. When trying to assess lifetime environmental exposures, researchers must consider the many changes in location a person goes through and the timeframes in which these changes occur, ultimately creating a multidimensional and dynamic dataset. Creating data collection protocols that are feasible to administer, result in accurate data, and minimize data missingness is a major challenge to undertake. Here, we provide an overview of the protocol developed to collect the lifetime residential address information of participants in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study.

Journal

MethodsX

Published

2024/04/03

Authors

Badilla P, Abad S, Smith C, Tsui B, Cardenas-Iniguez C, Herting MM

Keywords

ABCD Study, Addresses, Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study, Lifetime, Prospective, Protocol, Residential address history collection for geolinking exposures, Retrospective

DOI

10.1016/j.mex.2024.102673
Toggle A general exposome factor explains individual differences in functional brain network topography and cognition in youth. Developmental cognitive neuroscience Keller AS, Moore TM, Luo A, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Childhood environments are critical in shaping cognitive neurodevelopment. With the increasing availability of large-scale neuroimaging datasets with deep phenotyping of childhood environments, we can now build upon prior studies that have considered relationships between one or a handful of environmental and neuroimaging features at a time. Here, we characterize the combined effects of hundreds of inter-connected and co-occurring features of a child’s environment (“exposome”) and investigate associations with each child’s unique, multidimensional pattern of functional brain network organization (“functional topography”) and cognition. We apply data-driven computational models to measure the exposome and define personalized functional brain networks in pre-registered analyses. Across matched discovery (n=5139, 48.5% female) and replication (n=5137, 47.1% female) samples from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study, the exposome was associated with current (ages 9-10) and future (ages 11-12) cognition. Changes in the exposome were also associated with changes in cognition after accounting for baseline scores. Cross-validated ridge regressions revealed that the exposome is reflected in functional topography and can predict performance across cognitive domains. Importantly, a single measure capturing a child’s exposome could more accurately and parsimoniously predict cognition than a wealth of personalized neuroimaging data, highlighting the importance of children’s complex, multidimensional environments in cognitive neurodevelopment.

Journal

Developmental cognitive neuroscience

Published

2024/04/02

Authors

Keller AS, Moore TM, Luo A, Visoki E, Gataviņš MM, Shetty A, Cui Z, Fan Y, Feczko E, Houghton A, Li H, Mackey AP, Miranda-Dominguez O, Pines A, Shinohara RT, Sun KY, Fair DA, Satterthwaite TD, Barzilay R

Keywords

Cognition, Development, Environment, Exposome, Functional networks, Topography

DOI

10.1016/j.dcn.2024.101370
Toggle Longitudinal associations of screen time, physical activity, and sleep duration with body mass index in U.S. youth. The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity Zink J, Booker R, Wolff-Hughes DL, et al. 2024
PubMed Record

Abstract

Youth use different forms of screen time (e.g., streaming, gaming) that may be related to body mass index (BMI). Screen time is non-independent from other behaviors, including physical activity and sleep duration. Statistical approaches such as isotemporal substitution or compositional data analysis (CoDA) can model associations between these non-independent behaviors and health outcomes. Few studies have examined different types of screen time, physical activity, and sleep duration simultaneously in relation to BMI.

Journal

The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity

Published

2024/04/02

Authors

Zink J, Booker R, Wolff-Hughes DL, Allen NB, Carnethon MR, Alexandria SJ, Berrigan D

Keywords

ABCD study, Movement behaviors, Obesity, Youth

DOI

10.1186/s12966-024-01587-6